Sex Therapy

Sex therapy is a strategy for the improvement of sexual function and treatment of sexual dysfunction.

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Meet the specialists

 

I have completed the University of Michigan's Sexual Health Certification Program. I also am a part of multiple consultation teams with a focus on deepening my knowledge and experience in providing sex therapy. In addition, I am a member of AASECT (American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors, and Therapists) to continue to expand my training in areas of sex, sexuality, and sexual issues.

— Becky McGinnis, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Diego, CA

I am currently working on my sex therapy certification with the Sexual Health Alliance in order to eventually become a Certified Sex Therapist with AASECT.

— Callie Seymour, Marriage and Family Therapist Associate in Austin, TX
 

You and your partner(s) can’t get on the same page about intimacy - how to initiate, what feels good, how often. It causes arguments and the connection suffers. Sexual trauma has led you to feel cut off from or unsafe in your own body, but you are ready to reclaim yourself. You can feel positive, confident, and a deep sensual connection with your body or your partner(s). Sex therapy helps you know how to ask for what you want and to get what you need.

— Open Space Therapy Collective, Licensed Professional Counselor in Los Angeles, CA

Sex therapy is a specialty or a niche’ in counseling. I utilize my sex therapy training and integrate it into all of my work with clients. It doesn’t have to be the focus of your journey, but we can explore and get curious in a safe space that we co-create together. Whether it be relating to ourselves or each other, our sexuality, pleasure, and intimacy is deeply human and connects us all.

— Regan Rowell, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Based in Seattle, providing care across, WA
 

Under supervision, I am constantly learning new interventions, tools, and activities to address sexual concerns within a relationship and with yourself. One of the books I highly recommend is Come As You Are, by Emily Nagoski, Ph.D. I constantly refer to this book in sessions as it provides a plethora of information that every human being should know.

— Emerald Aueyong, Sex Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

You and your partner(s) can’t get on the same page about intimacy - how to initiate, what feels good, how often. It causes arguments and the connection suffers. Sexual trauma has led you to feel cut off from or unsafe in your own body, but you are ready to reclaim yourself. You can feel positive, confident, and a deep sensual connection with your body or your partner(s). Sex therapy helps you know how to ask for what you want and to get what you need.

— Kristen Crowe - Open Space Therapy Collective, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in LA, CA
 

Sex therapy can be an individual or couples endeavor and focuses on difficulties centered on sexuality and relationships. Views on sexual behavior can be as varied as our family, educational, and social experiences, and as a result, we can feel shamed, embarrassed, and confused regarding our sexual desires and interests. I strive to normalize a wide range of sexuality while assisting individuals in managing performance, communication, and anxiety due to misinformation.

— Leigha Ward, Clinical Psychologist in West Lake Hills, TX

I am a certified AASECT sex therapist, which gives me the education and expertise in addressing all things related to sex. I can assist clients in navigating sexual disorders such as ED or vaginismus, or exploring various alternative lifestyles related to kink or ethical non-monogamy. In the context of relationships, we can discuss the importance of effective communication, consent, novelty and thinking outside of the box.

— Tammy 'Kaia' Bruski, Sex Therapist in Denver, CO
 

My practice in sex therapy is rooted in trauma-informed, attachment-oriented, culturally responsive, and body-centered approaches. My expertise is in helping clients recover from sexual trauma, as well as empowering members of the LGBTQIA+ and the consensual non-monogamy communities to live in a fully expressed way free from trauma. I offer sex therapy to individuals and those in relationships.

— Natalia Amari, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX

Morgan is currently an AASECT member, and received training to apply for certification as a Sex Therapist. Morgan believes everyone deserves to have a pleasurable experience sexually, and understands that struggling with a sexual difficulty can feel isolating. Morgan believes it is important to have a deeper comprehension of the psychology behind what is driving the sexual difficulty to help integrate tools to build confidence while also providing sexual empowerment.

— Morgan Dominguez, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY
 

Sex therapy informs the work that I do by bringing the focus back to communication and the body. How we interact with other people and how our bodies feel can tell us so much about ourselves and those around us. In the therapy room we can increase our knowledge, improve our communication and connect with our bodies in ways that are helpful in and out of the bedroom.

— Brianna Hollestelle, Marriage and Family Therapist Associate in Parker, CO

I use sex therapy in my practice for those who are struggling with sexual issues of all kinds. There are many types of sex therapy that can be used with clients, together, we will only need to find the one that works for you.

— Neeka Wittern, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Las Vegas, NV, NV
 

I am trained in sex therapy and earned my certification as a sex therapist last year. Sex, sexuality, gender, etc. are all biological factors of being human and it transcends all cultures and races. Yet, it is the thing humans have the hardest time talking about. I provide a safe and non judgmental space to talk about sex and sex related issues in the hopes to normalize it and help move through the learned shame that often comes with sex issues.

— Lacy Isenburg, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX

Sex is deeply metaphoric to the relationship we have with ourselves and others. When we express ourselves sexually, we are almost always expressing a very deep part of ourselves. Sex is a complicated process. We have to be connected to our bodies, to our heads, and to another person all at the same time in the right amounts. All while our partner(s) are balancing the same complex tasks. I’m currently in the process of becoming a Certified Sex Therapist to better support couples.

— Courageous Couples Counseling, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Rosa, CA