Integrative Therapy

Integrative therapy is the integration of elements from different schools of psychotherapy in the treatment of a client. An integrative therapist will first assess their client and then match proven treatment techniques to their unique situation. As it is a highly individualized approach, integrative therapy can be used to treat any number of issues, including depression, anxiety, and personality disorders. Research has shown that tailoring therapy to the individual client can enhance treatment effectiveness. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s integrative therapy specialists today.

Meet the specialists

Integrative Psychotherapy embraces an attitude towards the practice of psychotherapy that affirms the inherent value of each individual. It is a unifying psychotherapy that responds appropriately and effectively to the person at the affective, behavioral, cognitive, and physiological levels of functioning, and addresses as well the spiritual dimension of life.

— Catherine Toufiles, Clinical Psychologist
 

In grad school I studied under the founders of a model for assessment and treatment that parallels the process of mental image formation. Called the Expressive Therapies Continuum, this model is used to assess strengths and challenges in the way a person experiences the world at physical, emotional, and intellectual levels, and treatment relies upon the integrative properties of creativity for connecting distress-causing breaks in an individual’s ability to process these levels simultaneously.

— Megan VanMeter, Art Therapist

I'm a lifelong learner, and a well-developed, skillful therapist. In years of professional development, I've received various levels of training in the following modalities: CBT, DBT, ACT, MI, SE, EMDR, NVC, IFS, psychodynamic, and group therapy. I borrow tools and insights from all these therapies and integrate them for my client's benefit with my primary grounding and advanced training in SCT and SAVI, which together offer a broad and deep framework for healing and growth.

— Joseph Hovey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY
 

While CBT is a great tool, there are outstanding therapies that can supplement CBT and be integrated together. I draw on some techniques from positive psychology, mindfulness, and developmental-behavioral analysis.

— Christopher Joaquim, Counselor in West Palm Beach, FL

I'm a lifelong learner, and a well-developed, skillful therapist. In years of graduate and post-graduate education, I've received various levels of training in the following modalities: CBT, DBT, ACT, MI, SE, EMDR, NVC, and IFS. I borrow tools and insights from all these therapies and integrate them for my client's benefit with my primary grounding and advanced training in systems-oriented (SCT) therapy and SAVI, which together offer a broad and deep framework for human challenges and growth.

— Joseph Hovey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY
 

I tailor therapy to each individual client combining different therapeutic tools and approaches to fit their specific needs.

— Kori Meyers, Counselor in Nashville, TN

Why do you need Integrative therapy? because our mind heals when it communicates with a healthier body. When you are happy, functioning with less anxiety, depression or conflict's your overall wellbeing heals and works together. There is less need for medication, we experience less mind and body disorders and disease, and you will have a more successful and well functioning life. This is the life cycle and the mind/body connection that leads to a healthier you mentally and in health.

— JESSICA DAWN RUSSELL, Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

My eclectic approach draws from evidence-based theories and yogic philosophy. I've been a practitioner of yoga for over two decades and have been a certified 200-hour teacher since 2018. I've found through understanding and applying the Yamas, or ethical principles of yoga, we can learn to live a more peaceful and healthier life. For example, "Ahimsa," non-harming, invites us to take a non-judgmental stance toward ourselves and others so we can focus more on the important things.

— Shelby Dwyer, Counselor in Cambridge, MA

I'm a lifelong learner, and well-developed, skillful therapist. In years of graduate and post-graduate education, I've received various levels of training in the following modalities: CBT, DBT, ACT, MI, SE, EMDR, NVC, and IFS. I borrow tools and insights from all these therapies and integrate them for my client's benefit with my primary grounding and advanced training in systems-oriented (SCT) therapy and SAVI, which together offer a broad and deep framework for human challenges and growth.

— Joseph Hovey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY
 

Each client has unique needs and responds to different styles. I use an integrated, trauma-informed, person-centered approach foremost. I get to know you as an individual, including your counseling goals, values, strengths, learning styles, and needs as a client. I then tie in modalities such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), Motivational Interviewing (MI), psychodynamics, and systemic lenses and techniques to help you.

— Johanna Karasik, Therapist in Northglenn, CO

By using integrative, it describes my approach that is largely grounded in interpersonal theory (see description below), feminism & social justice/liberation, a trauma-informed and self-compassion lens, and seeing therapy as a collaborative process.

— addyson tucker, Psychologist in Providence, RI
 

I most often work from an integrative perspective, which means I use techniques from psychodynamic, interpersonal, and cognitive behavioral theories. I use the techniques that are most appropriate for my individual client's situation, and the ones that appeal to them the most.

— Ginny Kington, Psychologist in Duluth, GA

Counseling is not meant to be a one size fits all approach. Integrative therapy combines different therapeutic practices and techniques to fit the needs of each individual client. Our integrative approach helps clients explore what is causing challenges in their life and helps them begin to approach life in a more open and productive way that works for them.

— Christina Rogers, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in St. Petersburg, FL
 

I greatly appreciate an Integrative approach, and love the ethical code "do no harm." At Northwestern University (Evanston, Illinois) we learned several types of therapy, including psychodynamic psychotherapy, and others that can be included as an integrative therapy approach, such as feminist, gestalt, attachment, culturally sensitive, existential, Gottman method, Mindfulness, narrative, and more.

— Dennis Smith, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Las Vegas, NV

In grad school I studied under the founders of a model for assessment and treatment that parallels the process of mental image formation. Called the Expressive Therapies Continuum, this model is used to assess strengths and challenges in the way a person experiences the world at physical, emotional, and intellectual levels, and treatment relies upon the integrative properties of creativity for connecting distress-causing breaks in an individual’s ability to process these levels simultaneously.

— Megan VanMeter, Art Therapist
 

I am trained in many forms of therapy and combine the tools from each that I feel are most appropriate for the symptoms that are present. This may include using strategies of mindfulness, dream work, identifying values-oriented goals, using exposure and response prevention, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, cognitive modification, emotion processing, and motivational interviewing.

— Lisa Ritter, Counselor in Beaverton, OR