Integrative Therapy

Integrative therapy is the integration of elements from different schools of psychotherapy in the treatment of a client. An integrative therapist will first assess their client and then match proven treatment techniques to their unique situation. As it is a highly individualized approach, integrative therapy can be used to treat any number of issues, including depression, anxiety, and personality disorders. Research has shown that tailoring therapy to the individual client can enhance treatment effectiveness. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s integrative therapy specialists today.

Meet the specialists

My therapy style is integrative, working with each client to create a treatment plan that fits their specific needs. Generally, I combine psychodynamic work with a strong client-centered/person-centered (Rogerian) orientation. I have experience with CBT and ACT techniques, work with substance use issues from a harm-reduction perspective. I also incorporate elements of narrative, feminist, and interpersonal therapy.

— Barton Shulman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Francisco, CA
 

Compassion Focused Therapy is a modern, twenty-first century therapeutic framework. CFT takes a biopsychosocial approach that recognizes how our mental well-being is interconnected with our physical and social well-being. As an integrative approach, CFT draws from contemplative traditions, as well as the latest in rigorous science of evolutionary psychology, neurology, human development, attachment theory, and social psychology.

— Ida Hammer, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in San Francisco, CA

Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) is a modern, twenty-first century counseling modality. As a holistic therapy, CFT takes a biopsychosocial approach that recognizes that our mental well-being is interconnected with our physical and social well-being. With an integrative approach, CFT draws from contemplative traditions, as well as the latest in rigorous science of evolutionary psychology, neurology, human development, attachment theory, and social psychology.

— Ida Hammer, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in San Francisco, CA
 

I greatly appreciate an Integrative approach, and love the ethical code "do no harm." At Northwestern University (Evanston, Illinois) we learned several types of therapy, including psychodynamic psychotherapy, and others that can be included as an integrative therapy approach, such as feminist, gestalt, attachment, culturally sensitive, existential, Gottman method, Mindfulness, narrative, and more.

— Dennis Smith, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Las Vegas, NV

Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) is a modern, twenty-first century counseling modality. As a holistic therapy, CFT takes a biopsychosocial approach that recognizes that our mental well-being is interconnected with our physical and social well-being. With an integrative approach, CFT draws from contemplative traditions, as well as the latest in rigorous science of evolutionary psychology, neurology, human development, attachment theory, and social psychology.

— Ida Hammer, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in San Francisco, CA
 

It's important to me to find what works regardless of particular modality. I tailor how I respond and what interventions I use based on what my client needs and what they're coming in with. I find that synthesizing different approaches based on needs and philosophies of the person I'm working with is the most effective way I can engage therapeutically. No one approach can cover everything, so I make sure to deepen my knowledge of many different modalities.

— Rayne Banneck, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

I greatly appreciate an Integrative approach, and love the ethical code "do no harm." At Northwestern University (Evanston, Illinois) we learned several types of therapy, including psychodynamic psychotherapy, and others that can be included as an integrative therapy approach, such as feminist, gestalt, attachment, culturally sensitive, existential, Gottman method, Mindfulness, narrative, and more.

— Dennis Smith, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Las Vegas, NV
 

I am trained in many forms of therapy and combine the tools from each that I feel are most appropriate for the symptoms that are present. This may include using strategies of mindfulness, dream work, identifying values-oriented goals, using exposure and response prevention, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, cognitive modification, emotion processing, and motivational interviewing.

— Lisa Ritter, Counselor in Beaverton, OR

Integrative therapy is a progressive form of psychotherapy that combines different therapeutic tools and approaches to fit the needs of the client. With an understanding of normal human development, an integrative therapist modifies standard treatments to fill in development gaps that affect each client in different ways. By combining elements drawn from different schools of psychological theory and research, integrative therapy becomes a more flexible and inclusive approach to treatment.

— Malika O'Neill, Licensed Professional Counselor in Media, PA
 

While I do work primarily from a CBT perspective and am certified in two trauma-focused CBT approaches (Cognitive Processing Therapy and Prolonged Exposure), I do also integrate other treatments. I use treatments grounded in research and do not consider myself to be a theoretical purist, as I believe in finding what works for the person sitting front of me.

— Audrey Atkinson, Clinical Psychologist in Davidson, NC

Integrative therapy is a progressive form of psychotherapy that combines different therapeutic tools and approaches to fit the needs of the individual client. With an understanding of normal human development, an integrative therapist modifies standard treatments to fill in development gaps that affect each client in different ways. By combining elements drawn from different schools of psychological theory and research.

— Jacqui Hicks, Counselor in Lansing, MI
 

The approach I take with each client is unique to that client's needs. My approach is integrative, which means that, in addition to talk therapy, I incorporate education, mindfulness, movement, breathing exercises, art therapy, sexual health information, and EMDR in my sessions where appropriate. This style reflects my authentic personality, and my love of variety and creativity, and I have found over the years that it serves my clients extremely well.

— Brandie Sellers, Licensed Professional Counselor in McKinney, TX

Within an overarching mulicultural framework, I conceptualize from psychodynamic, existential, social learning frameworks, and intervene primarily from ACT, Feminist, CBT, and trauma informed approaches. I believe early life experiences can be formative in shaping our worldview, and change involves being empowered to learn new ways to understand and cope with the experiences we encounter in life.

— Rakhi Sen, Psychologist
 

While coming from a program that was psychodynamic in nature, I never felt that that one theory was enough for the complexities of a person. I have received postdoctoral training in integrative therapy, which uses all of the major orientations and explores how they interconnect and best suit a variety of presenting issues and people.

— Julie Bindeman, Psychologist in Rockville, MD

I integrate most approaches based on the strengths, vulnerabilities and interests of the client. I do not expect a client to adjust to my theory, rather I adjust theory to help a client feel safe, in control and hopeful.

— Sarah Blaszczak, in Portland, OR