Integrative Therapy

Integrative therapy is the integration of elements from different schools of psychotherapy in the treatment of a client. An integrative therapist will first assess their client and then match proven treatment techniques to their unique situation. As it is a highly individualized approach, integrative therapy can be used to treat any number of issues, including depression, anxiety, and personality disorders. Research has shown that tailoring therapy to the individual client can enhance treatment effectiveness. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s integrative therapy specialists today.

Need help finding the right therapist?
Find Your Match

Meet the specialists

 

Counseling is not meant to be a one size fits all approach. Integrative therapy combines different therapeutic practices and techniques to fit the needs of each individual client. Our integrative approach helps clients explore what is causing challenges in their life and helps them begin to approach life in a more open and productive way that works for them.

— Christina Rogers, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in St. Petersburg, FL

I'm a lifelong learner, and a well-developed, skillful therapist. In years of graduate and post-graduate education, I've received various levels of training in the following modalities: CBT, DBT, ACT, MI, SE, EMDR, NVC, and IFS. I borrow tools and insights from all these therapies and integrate them for my client's benefit with my primary grounding and advanced training in systems-oriented (SCT) therapy and SAVI, which together offer a broad and deep framework for human challenges and growth.

— Joseph Hovey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY
 

In addition to traditional psychotherapeutic approaches, including trauma focused, psychodynamic and CBT, I am trained in various mind-body skills and Eastern therapeutic approaches including mindfulness, meditation, breath work, guided imagery, visualization and grounding practices. I am a certified Yoga Instructor (Kundalini), Kundalini Yoga incorporates the use of mantra (sound current), breath, body movements (kriyas) and meditation.

— Rachel Pires, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Plantation, FL

My therapy style is integrative, working with each client to create a treatment plan that fits their specific needs. Generally, I combine psychodynamic work with a strong client-centered/person-centered (Rogerian) orientation. I have experience with CBT and ACT techniques, work with substance use issues from a harm-reduction perspective. I also incorporate elements of narrative, feminist, and interpersonal therapy.

— Barton Shulman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Francisco, CA
 

Each client has unique needs and responds to different styles. I use an integrated, trauma-informed, person-centered approach foremost. I get to know you as an individual, including your counseling goals, values, strengths, learning styles, and needs as a client. I then tie in modalities such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), Motivational Interviewing (MI), psychodynamics, and systemic lenses and techniques to help you.

— Johanna Karasik, Counselor in Northglenn, CO

I believe each person's needs are unique which calls for customized treatment tailored specifically to address those individual needs. I am person-centered, strengths based and integrate various evidence-based modalities. I'll use Motivational Interviewing to help you move through challenges and elements of DBT, EFT and ACT to incorporate skills and tools. Though I find EMDR to be most effective in treating trauma, I will also use Narrative, Schema or Psychoanalytic Therapies when appropriate.

— Jeanie Vetter, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oceanside, CA
 

Integrative therapy is a flexible, inclusive practice that combines multiple theoretical orientations and techniques to promote healing on all levels: emotional, physical, mental, and spiritual. Your characteristics, preferences, needs, beliefs, and motivation are considered to formulate the best therapy approach. Some modalities I utilize include mindfulness, nutritional therapies, Brainspotting, harm reduction, and motivational interviewing within a holistic, existential framework.

— Tanya Hanrihan, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist

My eclectic approach draws from evidence-based theories and yogic philosophy. I've been a practitioner of yoga for over two decades and have been a certified 200-hour teacher since 2018. I've found through understanding and applying the Yamas, or ethical principles of yoga, we can learn to live a more peaceful and healthier life. For example, "Ahimsa," non-harming, invites us to take a non-judgmental stance toward ourselves and others so we can focus more on the important things.

— Shelby Dwyer, Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

One size does not fit all. Your needs are unique to you. I use a strengths-based approach drawing from person-centered, Humanistic/Existential, Cognitive Behavioral, trauma-focused and Psychodynamic approaches.

— Sergio Hernández, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Evanston, IL

I meet my clients where they are and use different therapeutic approaches to see what works best for each individual. Therapy is not one-size-fits-all and I use an integrative approach to help my clients start enjoying their lives again. During the beginning of our work together, I will try to collect as much pertinent information as you feel like sharing. We will move on from there and try to carve out a new way of being for you.

— Andrea Rodriguez, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor
 

I'm a lifelong learner, and well-developed, skillful therapist. In years of graduate and post-graduate education, I've received various levels of training in the following modalities: CBT, DBT, ACT, MI, SE, EMDR, NVC, and IFS. I borrow tools and insights from all these therapies and integrate them for my client's benefit with my primary grounding and advanced training in systems-oriented (SCT) therapy and SAVI, which together offer a broad and deep framework for human challenges and growth.

— Joseph Hovey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY

Integrative therapy is a progressive model of therapy that draws from many different therapeutic models to best suit the individual needs of the patient. Rather than imposing a rigid modality on every patient regardless of their needs or preferences, integrative therapeutic approaches adapt to the unique circumstances you bring to therapy.

— Liz Fletcher, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oklahoma City, OK
 

Art therapy is highly adaptive and as such lends itself well to enveloping a variety of theoretical practices and approaches. I have taken various workshops and trainings demonstrating the various ways to integrate techniques such as Mindfulness-Based Practices, DBT, and even Trauma-Informed Yoga into my practice as an Art Therapist. I also have had post-graduate training on utilizing creative techniques beyond the visual arts such as Poetry Therapy and Play Therapy techniques.

— Callie Wile, Art Therapist

Why do you need Integrative therapy? because our mind heals when it communicates with a healthier body. When you are happy, functioning with less anxiety, depression or conflict's your overall wellbeing heals and works together. There is less need for medication, we experience less mind and body disorders and disease, and you will have a more successful and well functioning life. This is the life cycle and the mind/body connection that leads to a healthier you mentally and in health.

— JESSICA DAWN RUSSELL, Therapist in Encino, CA
 

Training based from Leslie Korn, lectures and workshops from Phoenix Friends of Jung, Psychiatric Rehabilitation 3 course series at University of Arizona, and Women's Group work

— Wendy Howell, Licensed Professional Counselor in Glendale, AZ

I'm a lifelong learner, and a well-developed, skillful therapist. In years of professional development, I've received various levels of training in the following modalities: CBT, DBT, ACT, MI, SE, EMDR, NVC, IFS, psychodynamic, and group therapy. I borrow tools and insights from all these therapies and integrate them for my client's benefit with my primary grounding and advanced training in SCT and SAVI, which together offer a broad and deep framework for healing and growth.

— Joseph Hovey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY