Sexual Abuse or Assault

Sexual abuse is a term uses to describe any type of non-consensual sexual violence, including sexual assault or rape, child sexual abuse, and intimate partner sexual violence. Sexual violence can have lasting psychological, emotional, and physical effects on a survivor. Survivors will commonly feel a range of emotions, including shame, fear and guilt and may develop symptoms of depression, PTSD, addiction or anxiety. If you have experienced sexual abuse or assault of any kind, there is help available. You do not have to handle your issues alone. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts specializing in addressing the trauma of sexual abuse or assault.

Meet the specialists

 

I have completed the WA Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs Core Therapist training. I have also worked at two different Child Advocacy Centers where my primary clients were children who had experienced sexual abuse, non-offending family members, and adult survivors of abuse.

— Julie Sole, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Graham, WA

I have volunteered with and worked for domestic violence and sexual assault community resource centers for over 5 years. Serving as a Rape Crisis Counselor provided me the opportunity to companion survivors through the immediate and long-term aftermath of rape, sexual assault and abuse. I specialize in trauma-informed therapies as well as sex and gender therapy and somatic experiencing, all of which I combine to assist those suffering safely forward onto their path of healing.

— Letecia Garcia, Psychotherapist in Philadelphia, PA
 

LGBTQ youth are more vulnerable to childhood sexual abuse because sociocultural oppression can inhibit their development of a healthy sexual identity and sense of self. They are often alienated from family supports, robbed of proper sexual health education in schools, and made to form deep feelings of shame and secrecy. These marginalizing effects make them more vulnerable to predators and victimization. I have worked with LGBTQ-GNC, and male-identified survivors for 10yrs.

— Rory Valentine Diller, M.A., Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Orinda, CA
 

Sexual trauma can really shake us to our core. Living in a sexist world after a trauma can be overwhelming as a woman. Toxic masculinity is prevalent in both work and home life – creating complex triggers in unlikely places. As our awareness of these intersections between trauma and sexism increase, we may feel up in arms, ready to start a revolution! But we need to take exquisite care of ourselves first or else we are left feeling overwhelmed, drained and hopeless. After a sexual trauma we often wonder – can we ever feel beautiful, sexual, and/or feminine again and still feel safe? Can we trust others – or even ourselves – again? The answer is a resounding yes. Through a multi-modal approach that infuses relational, experiential and body-oriented approaches I help clients overcome trauma, create healthy boundaries, increase resilience, reclaim their sense of self and create the lives they wish to lead.

— Natalia Amari, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX

In almost every aspect of our lives from the time we are children, we are taught to stay silent about sexual violence. We are told that we should consider it a "normal" experience for women; we are told we deserved it, that we caused it somehow. No one deserves to be sexually assaulted, no exceptions. This is your journey, and you are in total control of it. I have worked with hundreds of victims and survivors, from ages 12 to 75, men and women. I want you to find your strength again.

— Laura Angelucci, Therapist in Austell, GA
 

Left untreated, the wounds of incest/childhood sexual abuse can permeate every area of your life as an adult. You might be silently plagued with nightmares, flashbacks, intrusive thoughts, and feeling like something bad is going to happen at any minute. Depression, anxiety, panic attacks, and maintaining the shame-based belief that the abuse was somehow your fault are all common reactions in adulthood. Know your healing is possible and that you deserve to heal.

— Leanne Lemire, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Phoenix, AZ

1 out of 3 women and 1 out of 5 men have suffered childhood sexual abuse. You are not alone. Although you may feel broken and carry shame or guilt, it was and is not your fault. It is not your shame or guilt to carry. I will help you put those burdens down, and find your own path towards healing and wholeness.

— Carolee Horning, Counselor in Eugene, OR
 

I will do everything I can to make my clients feel safe when discussing these sensitive topics. Some clients like to discuss the actual event(s), and some like to focus on how it has impacted their relationships, their self-esteem, their attachment style, their relationship to sex, and more. I provide psychoeducation on the impacts of abuse and assault and offer various paths of healing. And sometimes you just need a safe place to cry, and I can provide that too.

— Jennifer Kulka, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in San Diego, CA

In addition to working clinically with survivors of sexual abuse and assault, I am a Staff Trainer for MVP Strategies, a gender violence prevention program founded by Jackson Katz, PhD., utilizing the Bystander Approach. I have worked for over 10 years training individuals in the US Military, the entertainment industry, college and university athletic programs, and community groups to recognize and intervene in sexual violence in their immediate cultural contexts.

— Lauren Grousd, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Portland, ME
 

Dr. Stephen Oreski has been working to end Sexual Violence for over 20 years. His professional background includes leadership in social movements, policy, advocacy, and community organization.

— Dr. Stephen Oreski, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Paramus, NJ

Sexual violence can have psychological, emotional, and physical effects on a survivor. These effects aren’t always easy to deal with, but with the right help and support they can be managed (RAINN). I work with adults survivors of childhood sexual assault, and adult survivors of rape . I have the most experience with sexual abuse and assault having interned at the DC Rape Crisis Center during my graduate training and than later workin in Denver at RAAP now known as the Blue Bench.

— Alison "Ali" Pierucci, Therapist in Denver, CO
 

For almost fours years, I worked as a staff psychologist and Coordinator of Sexual Assault Services at Towson University. Over the past ten years, a large portion of the clients I have worked with have histories of sexual trauma.

— Catherine Sullivan-Windt, Counselor in Baltimore, MD

Although sexual assault and abuse is only just entering the mainstream consciousness, many many people out there have been all too familiar with it's impact for a long time. If you have a history of abuse or assault....or if you are questioning if what you went through "qualifies"....we can work together to unpack your experience and it's impact on your life, sense of self and security. We will explore how to manage triggers and the big confusing emotions that you have around your experience.

— Lynda Martin, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in New York, NY
 

I have experience working with survivors of sexual abuse or assault.

— Diana Groener, Counselor in Beaverton, OR

Many who have survived sexual trauma feel unsafe in their bodies, have extreme difficulty trusting themselves or others, or feel embarrassed or ashamed about what happened to them. It is common to have difficulty sleeping, frequent nightmares or flashbacks, depression, anxiety/panic attacks, or trouble managing overwhelming emotions. This can all very incredibly hard to talk about, so we will work at your pace. I will never ask you to do or say anything that you're not ready for.

— Peggy Johnson, Counselor in Knoxville, TN
 

My work as a counselor began in November 2016 when I accepted a clinical internship at a rape crisis counseling center in northern Illinois. There I worked with survivors of all ages, race, gender identity, and sexual orientation. In July 2017, they hired me as a full time therapist and I have made helping people recover from sexual violence my clinical focus ever since. This is my wheelhouse - I love working with survivors. There is no better honor than to be trusted with their story.

— Cyndy Rehberg, Licensed Professional Counselor in Fort Collins, CO

For almost fours years, I worked as a staff psychologist and Coordinator of Sexual Assault Services at Towson University. For the past ten years, a large portion of the clients I have worked with have histories of sexual trauma.

— Catherine Sullivan-Windt, Counselor in Baltimore, MD
 

I have worked at two rape crisis centers both before and during graduate school for my training, in addition to working at a specialized clinic for survivors of sexual violence for my postgraduate training.

— Miklos Hargitay, Psychologist in New York, NY

Extensive work with survivors which included counseling, advocacy, and resource work. Created a healing arts program for survivors and providing awareness. WCASA Award Winner for my Sexual Assault Advocacy. Specialized Trauma Counseling Training. Seeking Safety Training, Received Human Trafficking I Training.

— Catina Cole, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Milwaukee, WI

I have volunteered with and worked for domestic violence and sexual assault community resource centers for over 5 years. Serving as a Rape Crisis Counselor provided me the opportunity to companion survivors through the immediate and long-term aftermath of rape, sexual assault and abuse. I specialize in trauma-informed therapies as well as sex and gender therapy and somatic experiencing, all of which I combine to assist those suffering safely forward onto their path of healing.

— Letecia Garcia, Psychotherapist in Philadelphia, PA
 

EMDR is a useful modality for people who are experiencing symptoms caused by traumatic events like sexual abuse and sexual assault. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) can also be useful for sexual abuse and sexual assault survivors because it teaches strategies to become more mindful of the present moment, cope with painful emotions in safe and healthy ways, and establish healthy boundaries and communicate effectively with others.

— Kristen Hornung, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Encinitas, CA