Somatic Therapy (Body Centered)

Somatic therapy, also sometimes known as body-centered therapy, refers to approaches that integrate a client’s physical body into the therapeutic process. Somatic therapy focuses on the mind-body connection and is founded on the belief that viewing the mind and body as one entity is essential to the therapeutic process. Somatic therapy practitioners will typically integrate elements of talk therapy with therapeutic body techniques to provide holistic healing. Somatic therapy is particularly helpful for those trying to cope with abuse or trauma, but it is also used to treat issues including anxiety, depression, stress, relationship problems, grief, or addiction, among others. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s somatic therapy experts today.

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I practice Hakomi style mindfulness-based somatic therapy (I completed Level 1 training). This work is incredibly useful in accessing the wisdom of the body, clarifying your wants and needs and maintaining emotional safety while working through trauma. Your experience in the present moment is the vehicle and involves way less talking. Often with the eyes closed, focusing on sensations, images, memories, beliefs and thoughts in the present, we work to provide past missing experiences.

— Chauney Peck, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

I believe that the deep wisdom of our body can support us through many of our challenges. By harnessing our movement, sensations, and breath, we can access the parts of ourselves that exist beneath our consciousness. In doing so, we can re-experience ourselves in ways beyond our old stories—and, help us learn, grow, and heal.

— Jun Akiyama, Licensed Professional Counselor in Longmont, CO
 

Trauma and stress are stored in the body. Effective healing will include exercises and routines that address areas of tension and support our bodies' natural ability to release and reset to a state of calm and safety.

— Lisa Carr, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Winston-Salem, NC

Our modern culture tends to solve every problem by logically thinking it through, however research shows that our body keeps the score of our experiences. By dropping into our body’s experience we can further work with the issues on the deepest level and invite lasting change. Together with somatic tools, we can bring caring attention to what your body is saying. I might help you tune into that sensation, unlock a feeling, and give you the support and tools to process what we find.

— Emilee Kerr, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Santa Rosa, CA
 

I have a certificate in somatic psychotherapy from anti-och university.

— Coty Nolin, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO

Somatic therapy is technique used to support with processing trauma that is held in the body.

— Sarah Levy, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Arlington, MA
 

I invite you to take a moment now, to check in with your body. You don't need to change a thing physically, just allow your attention to shift inward as you continue to look at your phone or computer screen. What do you notice? By acknowledging and accessing our body's intelligence, therapy is much more effective and deeper than psychoanalysis alone. In our work, we will gently explore what it's like for you to be in your body, guiding you towards increased feelings of safety comfort and ease.

— TESSA SINCLAIR, Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

I could have spent my whole life talking about trauma instead of moving it through. As a student who stumbled into the field, I was its biggest critic. I wanted evidence that the body mattered. In my most profound relationships now as client or healer, we don't talk a lot & the evidence is right there in the ability to process & release pain without analysis paralysis. I lead folx to learn from their own body how stress shapes the way they walk the world & they let it lead them toward freedom

— Sarah Kendrick, Psychotherapist in Portland, OR
 

Somatic Experiencing (SE) is what is called a bottom-up type of therapy as it involves learning to pay attention to (or track) your sensations and emotions (what is happening in the body) which will result in changes to feelings and cognitions. When we experience threatening situations and cannot fight or flight the survival energy gets stored in the body but thankfully can be released later. In learning how to pay attention and release it one becomes more connected to themselves and others.

— Addie Michlitsch, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Roseville, MN

I believe that the deep wisdom of our body can support us through many of our challenges. By harnessing our movement, sensations, and breath, we can access the parts of ourselves that exist beneath our consciousness. In doing so, we can re-experience ourselves in ways beyond our old stories—and, help us learn, grow, and heal.

— Jun Akiyama, Licensed Professional Counselor in Longmont, CO
 

iRest Yoga Nidra Level One Teacher Certification with Richard Miller, Ph.D.‘s Integrative Restoration Institute (2017) Certified in Trauma-informed Yoga with Hala Khouri & Kyra Heglund, (both LCSW, SEP, ERYT) (2017)

— Aly Dearborn, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

With specific training in Somatic Intervention (SI) I utilize the body to: * Heal trauma & other stress disorders * Move toward more safety & connection with yourself & others * Discharge tension in the body & associated memories that bring discomfort to distress * Sense & interrupt habitual patterns (ie anxiety, anger, stress or fear) & then to move forward in your life centered & more calm * Improve negative situations & change their course * Increase your sense of being understood * & More!

— Brian La Roy Jones, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Walnut Creek, CA
 

My graduate degree is in somatic psychotherapy and a lot of the trainings I have attended since graduating have focused on neuroscience and body based interventions. I don't have particular certifications because I studied many different modalities in school. We experience the world around us through our bodies, so the healing has to include the body. I typically start with education about how our bodies process the world and then utilize body based interventions.

— Tia (Christia) Young, Counselor

Our bodies hold important information, when we're able to listen. I've done trainings with Peter Levine and Bessel van der Kolk , and integrate their valuable lessons into my therapeutic work. We will get "centered" at the beginning of every session, slowing down and noticing the important experiences that we have in our core, in that "place without words." By listening closely to our emotions, paired with our thoughts, we find greater clarity and the energy we need for change and growth.

— Joseph Hovey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY
 

Rita draws from her yoga teaching experiences to help clients become more attuned to their bodies.

— Rita Aliperti, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY

Trauma and experiences happen to our bodies, and because of that, I believe in a body-centered approach to therapy. We know traditional talk therapy isn't enough anymore, especially when it comes to trauma. I help you to feel more safe and secure within your body. I am trained in somatic experiencing and sensorimotor psychotherapy, and I'm a certified Trauma Conscious Yoga Method yoga teacher. I help you connect to your nervous system to calm, nurture, and release trapped pain.

— Toni Richter, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Saint Louis, MO
 

Our mind and body are so connected that we can experience stress in different places all over our body, this can show itself in many ways such as a source of pain to loss of appetite. By asking questions and getting to know the client I will also incorporate breathwork, guided meditation, and sometimes send the client home with some stretches to use throughout the week to continue to work the stress out.

— Tifarah Canion, Licensed Professional Counselor in New Braunfels, TX

Movement and play is the foundation of integration between our spirit and minds. The body gives a specific place for us to experience our lives and selves. We were given our bodies and despite the bumps, dips and trips it is our bodies that bring us to expeirncing our lives more fully and naturally. The body can be incorporated into our work in many ways: through physical movement; play, dream body experiences; body awareness; and internal "parts work".

— Erik Johnston, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Overland Park, KS