Somatic Therapy (Body Centered)

Somatic therapy, also sometimes known as body-centered therapy, refers to approaches that integrate a client’s physical body into the therapeutic process. Somatic therapy focuses on the mind-body connection and is founded on the belief that viewing the mind and body as one entity is essential to the therapeutic process. Somatic therapy practitioners will typically integrate elements of talk therapy with therapeutic body techniques to provide holistic healing. Somatic therapy is particularly helpful for those trying to cope with abuse or trauma, but it is also used to treat issues including anxiety, depression, stress, relationship problems, grief, or addiction, among others. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s somatic therapy experts today.

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Meet the specialists

 

Somatic psychotherapy begins with the premise that our bodies are always communicating.

— Ashley Gregory, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in East Bay, CA

iRest Yoga Nidra Level One Teacher Certification with Richard Miller, Ph.D.‘s Integrative Restoration Institute (2017) Certified in Trauma-informed Yoga with Hala Khouri & Kyra Heglund, (both LCSW, SEP, ERYT) (2017)

— Aly Dearborn, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA
 

My entire graduate studies were focused on Somatic Psychology at the California Institute for Integral Studies. This orientation provides an added dimension by taking the therapy out of the arena of second-hand reports (from your verbal mind) and into first-hand, felt experience. Our bodies often reveal first what our verbal, self conscious mind attempts to disguise and hide. I utilize Somatic interventions to potentially open you up to information that can be overlooked in most analytic psychotherapy. Traditional therapy practices pay attention almost exclusively to thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. In Somatics, the added awareness of sensations and felt experiences within the body are used to deepen the work. This can provide a channel of cooperation between the unconscious and conscious. In turn, Somatics helps to facilitate communication among parts of yourself that may be lost, hidden, or isolated.

— Vanessa Tate, Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO

Body Psychotherapy is holistic; it takes the entire human being and his/her/their life experiences into account. It offers mindful consideration to the crucial role of the body in the structure and process of the psyche. During a session, I pay close attention to sensation and body states, which allow unconscious material to manifest and possibly be worked with using breath, spatial awareness, consented therapeutic touch, movement, sensation, and imagery.

— Lina Návar, Psychotherapist in Austin, TX
 

“This is your body, your greatest gift, pregnant with wisdom you do not hear, grief you thought was forgotten, and joy you have never known.” -Marion Woodman. Neuroscientific research shows there is no separation between body and mind. We feel symptoms of anxiety, depression, or trauma in the body: racing heart, churning stomach, fatigue, aches and pains. I use gentle, safe, somatic methods to help clients process experiences and learn simple, effective somatic skills to reduce symptoms.

— Michelle Sargent, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in VALLEY VILLAGE, CA

I am a certified teacher of The Realization Process, an embodied path to spiritual awakening, personal growth, and healing created by Judith Blackstone.

— Andrew Conner, Marriage and Family Therapist Associate in Portland, OR
 

Working in health psychology and with complicated/chronic health conditions has allowed Dr. Salomon to understand that the body is continuously communicating with us. Learning to listen to the body and understand and respond mindfully and with compassion is key. The body provides the information needed to reduce suffering. Learning how to differentiate body based feedback from thoughts is essential in the process of somatic work.

— Angela Salomon, Psychotherapist in Phoenix, AZ

I am a graduate of the JFKU somatic psychotherapy program, and have a certificate from relationalsomatichealing.com. My practice is framed in incorporating the body into our process through safe somatic touch, movement and mindfulness practices. We hold unexpressed emotions, trauma, and parts of ourselves in our body, and if we can slow down together we can begin to make shifts in our entire constitution.

— Erica Berman, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

Somatic therapy focuses on awareness of your body, like physical sensations, position in space, impulses to move, vocalizations, and urges to express. It also includes mindfulness of your nervous system on all fronts, including repeating thoughts, mental images and memories, and shifts in attention. I use gentle curiosity to help you notice what feels good and what feels uncomfortable to support the natural expression of aspects of yourself that may have been suppressed and inhibit relaxation.

— Kristy Johnsson, Licensed Professional Counselor in Jackson, WY

I have completed training for Somatic Experiencing.

— Crystal Nesfield, Counselor in Phoenix, AZ
 

Body Psychotherapy and Movement Therapy go beyond traditional “talk therapy” as these specialized approaches offer mindful consideration to the crucial role of the body structure and process of the psyche. During a session, I pay close attention to sensation and body states, which allow unconscious material to authentically manifest and possibly be worked with using breath, spatial awareness, consented therapeutic touch, movement, sensation, and imagery.

— Lina Návar, Psychotherapist in Austin, TX

We have multiple providers who work with Somatic Therapy techniques for body based healing and self-acceptance.

— Selah Counseling & Wellness, Counselor in Springfield, OR
 

I could have spent my whole life talking about trauma instead of moving it through. As a student who stumbled into the field, I was its biggest critic. I wanted evidence that the body mattered. In my most profound relationships now as client or healer, we don't talk a lot & the evidence is right there in the ability to process & release pain without analysis paralysis. I lead folx to learn from their own body how stress shapes the way they walk the world & they let it lead them toward freedom

— Sarah Kendrick, Mental Health Counselor in Portland, OR

My graduate degree is in somatic psychotherapy and a lot of the trainings I have attended since graduating have focused on neuroscience and body based interventions. I don't have particular certifications because I studied many different modalities in school. We experience the world around us through our bodies, so the healing has to include the body. I typically start with education about how our bodies process the world and then utilize body based interventions.

— Tia (Christia) Young, Counselor
 

I am trained in the use of EMDR and Brainspotting to address a range of issues.

— Claire Reclosado-Baclay, Psychologist in Vallejo, CA

I am certified in the Rosenberg system of Integrative Body Psychotherapy (IBP) as a practitioner and teacher. IBP is a philosophy of psychotherapy that affirms the inseparability of mind, body, and spirit in the human experience, and offers a framework for working with painful, limiting patterns on a body level in addition to psychological/verbal.

— Wendy Dingee, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Las Vegas, NV
 

Somatic Therapy is focuses on body sensations and gentle movement to increase the flow of energy in your body. This is important because we store our emotions, memories and experiences in the tissues in our body so without addressing our trauma and pain from a somatic place it's easy to feel "stuck". Somatic Therapy brings self-awareness of your physical body and emotional states so you understand

— Elizabeth Sumpf, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR

Somatic Therapy is focuses on body sensations and gentle movement to increase the flow of energy in your body. This is important because we store our emotions, memories and experiences in the tissues in our body so without addressing our trauma and pain from a somatic place it's easy to feel "stuck". Somatic Therapy brings self-awareness to your physical body and emotional states for a deeper understanding of what you're feeling and then what you need to care for yourself in the moment.

— Elizabeth Sumpf, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR