Somatic Therapy (Body Centered)

Somatic therapy, also sometimes known as body-centered therapy, refers to approaches that integrate a client’s physical body into the therapeutic process. Somatic therapy focuses on the mind-body connection and is founded on the belief that viewing the mind and body as one entity is essential to the therapeutic process. Somatic therapy practitioners will typically integrate elements of talk therapy with therapeutic body techniques to provide holistic healing. Somatic therapy is particularly helpful for those trying to cope with abuse or trauma, but it is also used to treat issues including anxiety, depression, stress, relationship problems, grief, or addiction, among others. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s somatic therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

My entire graduate studies were focused on Somatic Psychology at the California Institute for Integral Studies. This orientation provides an added dimension by taking the therapy out of the arena of second-hand reports (from your verbal mind) and into first-hand, felt experience. Our bodies often reveal first what our verbal, self conscious mind attempts to disguise and hide. I utilize Somatic interventions to potentially open you up to information that can be overlooked in most analytic psychotherapy. Traditional therapy practices pay attention almost exclusively to thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. In Somatics, the added awareness of sensations and felt experiences within the body are used to deepen the work. This can provide a channel of cooperation between the unconscious and conscious. In turn, Somatics helps to facilitate communication among parts of yourself that may be lost, hidden, or isolated.

— Vanessa Tate, Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO
 

For the past two years I have been a participant in the three-year Somatic Experiencing (SE)ⓒ Training Program for resolving trauma and I've completed the Intermediate level of the training. I will be an Advanced student in the Spring. SE has taught me the immense value of the body, as experienced from within, as a resource for healing and transforming physical, emotional, psychological and spiritual wounds, and behavior patterns that have been a source of pain and suffering for years.

— Peter Carpentieri, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

My graduate degree is in somatic psychotherapy and a lot of the trainings I have attended since graduating have focused on neuroscience and body based interventions. I don't have particular certifications because I studied many different modalities in school. We experience the world around us through our bodies, so the healing has to include the body. I typically start with education about how our bodies process the world and then utilize body based interventions.

— Tia (Christia) Young, Counselor
 

The mind and the body are intricately connected; with the body holding its own memory. Somatic work can aid in a holistic focus where the two worlds can work together to facilitate healing.

— Brittney George, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA

I often use mind-body exercises when helping people cope with stress, anxiety, depression and life changes. Since the mind and the body and interconnected, I often find that blending talking with body-based work often leads to more effective and long lasting relief. Also, as a certified yoga teacher of 20 years, I draw from yoga postures, breath practices and relaxation techniques I have collected over the years. Body centered therapy is paced with your comfort level.

— Amanda Rebel, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO
 

Body Psychotherapy is holistic; it takes the entire human being and his/her/their life experiences into account. It offers mindful consideration to the crucial role of the body in the structure and process of the psyche. During a session, I pay close attention to sensation and body states, which allow unconscious material to manifest and possibly be worked with using breath, spatial awareness, consented therapeutic touch, movement, sensation, and imagery.

— Lina Návar, Psychotherapist in Austin, TX

Somatic Therapy recognizes the intertwined mind-body relationship and offers techniques for accessing the body’s intelligence. Guided imagery and mindfulness modalities can help reveal insights into how you feel about something that you might not have been aware of at a cognitive level.

— Ellie Lotan, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA
 

Western culture privileges the knowledge of our minds over the wisdom of our bodies. We know that the body holds memory and pain and is reponsible for a huge part of our emotional experience and reactions. We work with clients to become more acquainted with emotions as they are experienced in their bodies and build techniques to help lessen reactivity, soothe anxiety and worry, heal and release trauma responses, and feel more at ease.

— Kindman & Co. Therapy Practice, Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Body Psychotherapy and Movement Therapy go beyond traditional “talk therapy” as these specialized approaches offer mindful consideration to the crucial role of the body structure and process of the psyche. During a session, I pay close attention to sensation and body states, which allow unconscious material to authentically manifest and possibly be worked with using breath, spatial awareness, consented therapeutic touch, movement, sensation, and imagery.

— Lina Návar, Psychotherapist in Austin, TX
 

I'm a Somatic Experiencing Practitioner and offer touch/tablework for trauma and relational issues.

— Katy Adams, Psychotherapist in Austin, TX

Bridging our thoughts with a felt sense to our thinking patterns and fears can be super helpful to help our shifts in thinking to "stick"!

— Genoa Hamiel, Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

Somatic awareness is central to helping the whole person to heal. It is a fact that the body and mind together form a complete person. My work is influenced by several schools of psychotherapy, therapeutic massage and somatic practices (bodywork), all of which help people to understand their bodies, injuries, emotional lives, relationships, illnesses and personal dynamics as part of their healing process. I will often integrate somatic practices into psychotherapy.

— Paul C. Briggs, Clinical Social Worker in Hollywood, FL