Somatic Therapy (Body Centered)

Somatic therapy, also sometimes known as body-centered therapy, refers to approaches that integrate a client’s physical body into the therapeutic process. Somatic therapy focuses on the mind-body connection and is founded on the belief that viewing the mind and body as one entity is essential to the therapeutic process. Somatic therapy practitioners will typically integrate elements of talk therapy with therapeutic body techniques to provide holistic healing. Somatic therapy is particularly helpful for those trying to cope with abuse or trauma, but it is also used to treat issues including anxiety, depression, stress, relationship problems, grief, or addiction, among others. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s somatic therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

I often use mind-body exercises when helping people cope with stress, anxiety, depression and life changes. Since the mind and the body and interconnected, I often find that blending talking with body-based work often leads to more effective and long lasting relief. Also, as a certified yoga teacher of 20 years, I draw from yoga postures, breath practices and relaxation techniques I have collected over the years. Body centered therapy is paced with your comfort level.

— Amanda Rebel, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO
 

The theory behind somatic therapy is that the mind, body, spirit, and emotions are all related and connected to each other. As a result, the stress of past emotional and traumatic events affects the central nervous system and can cause changes in the body and even in body language, often resulting in altered facial expressions and posture as well as physical pain. Somatic therapy helps you to release... the emotions that remain in your body from these past negative experiences. -Psychology Today

— Jules Allison, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

Somatic Therapy is focuses on body sensations and gentle movement to increase the flow of energy in your body. This is important because we store our emotions, memories and experiences in the tissues in our body so without addressing our trauma and pain from a somatic place it's easy to feel "stuck". Somatic Therapy brings self-awareness of your physical body and emotional states so you understand

— Elizabeth Sumpf, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR
 

Through art, breath and energy work we work with the body to help clients feel more grounded, present and calm.

— Celine Redfield, Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR

We all experience emotions through our bodies. Body-centered allows a deeper level of clarity about your feelings, and a more direct way of engaging with them.

— Abigail Thompson, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

I work heavily with the human bio-energy field. Somatic experiencing is a complimentary therapy to Energy Psychology that also focuses on energy within the body which is activated in our nervous system and felt physically. Healing trauma requires discharging the toxic stress/energy from the physical body. Have you ever felt like talking just doesn't resolve things?? That's because it doesn't; we cannot heal trauma by thought alone. It is a physical and cellular experience.

— Michelle Byrd, Counselor in Denver, CO

I draw on a process that allows you to identify and connect with your body where you feel bound, stuck, or any sensation that feels out of place. There is a language of accepting this experience and encouraging it to move through and integrate into your overall body mind wisdom.

— Carolyn Memmott, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in West Jordan, UT
 

I draw on a process that allows you to identify and connect with your body where you feel bound, stuck, or any sensation that feels out of place. There is a language of accepting this experience and encouraging it to move through and integrate into your overall body mind wisdom.

— Carolyn Memmott, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in West Jordan, UT

My favorite way of working includes the body. When the body mind connection are recognized, you access your wisest self. You also experience an improvement in mood, a decrease in anxiety, and experience more fulfilling connections with yourself and with others.

— Sara Rotger, Marriage & Family Therapist in Montrose, CA
 

My entire graduate studies were focused on Somatic Psychology at the California Institute for Integral Studies. This orientation provides an added dimension by taking the therapy out of the arena of second-hand reports (from your verbal mind) and into first-hand, felt experience. Our bodies often reveal first what our verbal, self conscious mind attempts to disguise and hide. I utilize Somatic interventions to potentially open you up to information that can be overlooked in most analytic psychotherapy. Traditional therapy practices pay attention almost exclusively to thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. In Somatics, the added awareness of sensations and felt experiences within the body are used to deepen the work. This can provide a channel of cooperation between the unconscious and conscious. In turn, Somatics helps to facilitate communication among parts of yourself that may be lost, hidden, or isolated.

— Vanessa Tate, Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO

I draw on a process that allows you to identify and connect with your body where you feel bound, stuck, or any sensation that feels out of place. There is a language of accepting this experience and encouraging it to move through and integrate into your overall body mind wisdom.

— Carolyn Memmott, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in West Jordan, UT
 

Somatic Psychology (body-mind psychotherapy, body-oriented psychotherapy, etc.) is a holistic form of therapy that respects and utilizes the powerful connection between body, mind, and spirit. How we are in this world, how we relate to ourselves and others, is not just purely about the mind or our thoughts, but is also deeply rooted in our bodies and our spirits. Unlike traditional talk therapy or cognitive therapy, Somatic Psychology tends to be more experiential and powerful.

— Chris Tickner, PhD, MFT, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA

Utilizing somatic interventions like he trauma-based intervention, Community Resiliency Model®, I integrate psychotherapy, mindfulness and somatic work in helping balance the mind, body and soul from trauma responses, anxiety and other forms of emotional and physiological dysregulation.

— Robert Novickas, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Utilizing somatic interventions like he trauma-based intervention, Community Resiliency Model®, I integrate psychotherapy, mindfulness and somatic work in helping balance the mind, body and soul from trauma responses, anxiety and other forms of emotional and physiological dysregulation.

— Robert Novickas, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Living in the body-obsessed culture that we do, our bodies are not truly our own and most people tend to live from the neck up. We move through this world using our minds, rather than our bodies, and often do not tap into the natural wisdom our bodies have to offer. I encourage clients to return to their bodies and begin listening to their bodies again.

— Jacqueline 'Jackie' Abeling, Marriage & Family Therapist in ,
 

Western culture privileges the knowledge of our minds over the wisdom of our bodies. We know that the body holds memory and pain and is reponsible for a huge part of our emotional experience and reactions. We work with clients to become more acquainted with emotions as they are experienced in their bodies and build techniques to help lessen reactivity, soothe anxiety and worry, heal and release trauma responses, and feel more at ease.

— Kindman & Co. Therapy Practice, Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

I'm a Somatic Experiencing Practitioner and offer touch/tablework for trauma and relational issues.

— Katy Adams, Psychotherapist in Austin, TX
 

Through my Focusing & Indigenous Focusing Oriented Therapy methods, we can use the "felt sense" to get in touch w/ what our body is telling us - how it has a sense of "knowing" where we are stuck, or where we might like to go, that often doesn't even need words. Talk therapy can do a lot, but in many cases, we can feel like we hit a wall. Somatic approaches including cultivating the felt sense, engaging the right brain & limbic system, & working with body-based approaches can be transformative.

— Francesca Maxime, Therapist in Brooklyn, NY

Body Psychotherapy is holistic; it takes the entire human being and his/her/their life experiences into account. It offers mindful consideration to the crucial role of the body in the structure and process of the psyche. During a session, I pay close attention to sensation and body states, which allow unconscious material to manifest and possibly be worked with using breath, spatial awareness, consented therapeutic touch, movement, sensation, and imagery.

— Lina Návar, Psychotherapist in Austin, TX
 

Every experience we have affects us on a bodily level. We feel emotions in a physical way, thoughts make us cringe or tense up, memories can make us feel like we are physically back in the past. Traditional talk therapy ignored the body and tried to change our patterns by only engaging our thinking mind. Somatic therapy is a powerful new tool we have for healing. When we engage the body, we engage and heal all parts of our experience. I use sensorimotor psychotherapy, yoga, and meditation.

— Laura Stephan, Psychologist