Somatic Therapy (Body Centered)

Somatic therapy, also sometimes known as body-centered therapy, refers to approaches that integrate a client’s physical body into the therapeutic process. Somatic therapy focuses on the mind-body connection and is founded on the belief that viewing the mind and body as one entity is essential to the therapeutic process. Somatic therapy practitioners will typically integrate elements of talk therapy with therapeutic body techniques to provide holistic healing. Somatic therapy is particularly helpful for those trying to cope with abuse or trauma, but it is also used to treat issues including anxiety, depression, stress, relationship problems, grief, or addiction, among others. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s somatic therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

Through my Focusing & Indigenous Focusing Oriented Therapy methods, we can use the "felt sense" to get in touch w/ what our body is telling us - how it has a sense of "knowing" where we are stuck, or where we might like to go, that often doesn't even need words. Talk therapy can do a lot, but in many cases, we can feel like we hit a wall. Somatic approaches including cultivating the felt sense, engaging the right brain & limbic system, & working with body-based approaches can be transformative.

— Francesca Maxime, Therapist in Brooklyn, NY
 

I could have spent my whole life talking about trauma instead of moving it through. As a student who stumbled into the field, I was its biggest critic. I wanted evidence that felt senses mattered. In my most profound relationships now as client or healer, we don't talk a lot & the evidence is right there in the ability to process & release pain without analysis paralysis. I lead folx to learn from their own body how stress shapes the way they walk the world & they let it lead them toward freedom

— Sarah Kendrick, Mental Health Counselor in Portland, OR

A large part of my focus as a therapist is encouraging and helping my clients to become more aware of the thoughts passing through their minds as well as the sensations in their body. The body holds many of our memories and is constantly communicating with us on how it feels towards a particular situation. But the body's manner of communicating is often much quieter than our minds and may take some time in order to learn how to hear what the body is trying to tell us.

— Alejandro Rodriguez, Mental Health Counselor in Lake Mary, FL
 

I am a certified Somatic Experiencing Therapist. The training was three years and I attend additional ongoing training and consultation regularly.

— Jessica Dyer, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oakland, CA

For the past two years I have been a participant in the three-year Somatic Experiencing (SE)ⓒ Training Program for resolving trauma and I've completed the Intermediate level of the training. I will be an Advanced student in the Spring. SE has taught me the immense value of the body, as experienced from within, as a resource for healing and transforming physical, emotional, psychological and spiritual wounds, and behavior patterns that have been a source of pain and suffering for years.

— Peter Carpentieri, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA
 

I am a graduate of the JFKU somatic psychotherapy program, and have a certificate from relationalsomatichealing.com. My practice is framed in incorporating the body into our process through safe somatic touch, movement and mindfulness practices. We hold unexpressed emotions, trauma, and parts of ourselves in our body, and if we can slow down together we can begin to make shifts in our entire constitution.

— Erica Berman, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

I draw on a process that allows you to identify and connect with your body where you feel bound, stuck, or any sensation that feels out of place. There is a language of accepting this experience and encouraging it to move through and integrate into your overall body mind wisdom.

— Carolyn Memmott, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in West Jordan, UT
 

The mind and the body are intricately connected; with the body holding its own memory. Somatic work can aid in a holistic focus where the two worlds can work together to facilitate healing.

— Brittney George, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA

The theory behind somatic therapy is that the mind, body, spirit, and emotions are all related and connected to each other. As a result, the stress of past emotional and traumatic events affects the central nervous system and can cause changes in the body and even in body language, often resulting in altered facial expressions and posture as well as physical pain. Somatic therapy helps you to release... the emotions that remain in your body from these past negative experiences. -Psychology Today

— Jules Allison, Professional Counselor Associate in Portland, OR
 

Bridging our thoughts with a felt sense to our thinking patterns and fears can be super helpful to help our shifts in thinking to "stick"!

— Noa Hamiel, Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

I'm a Somatic Experiencing Practitioner and offer touch/tablework for trauma and relational issues.

— Katy Adams, Psychotherapist in Austin, TX
 

I draw on a process that allows you to identify and connect with your body where you feel bound, stuck, or any sensation that feels out of place. There is a language of accepting this experience and encouraging it to move through and integrate into your overall body mind wisdom.

— Carolyn Memmott, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in West Jordan, UT

I am a certified teacher of The Realization Process, an embodied path to spiritual awakening, personal growth, and healing created by Judith Blackstone.

— Andrew Conner, Registered Marriage and Family Therapist Intern in Portland, OR
 

We all experience emotions through our bodies. Body-centered allows a deeper level of clarity about your feelings, and a more direct way of engaging with them.

— Abigail Thompson, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

Through art, breath and energy work we work with the body to help clients feel more grounded, present and calm.

— Celine Redfield, Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR
 

Western culture privileges the knowledge of our minds over the wisdom of our bodies. We know that the body holds memory and pain and is reponsible for a huge part of our emotional experience and reactions. We work with clients to become more acquainted with emotions as they are experienced in their bodies and build techniques to help lessen reactivity, soothe anxiety and worry, heal and release trauma responses, and feel more at ease.

— Kindman & Co. Therapy Practice, Therapist in Los Angeles, CA