Anger Issues

Blowing up or losing your cool once in a while doesn’t necessarily mean you have an anger issue. But if you find yourself experiencing long-term feelings of anger or rage, which may also include aggressive, violent or self-destructive behaviors, you may be facing an anger management issue. Those experiencing anger issues may also have physical symptoms including high blood pressure, headaches, or fatigue. Whether your anger issue is caused by stress, genetics, hormones or your current environment, you don’t have to figure it out alone. Contact one of our specialists today.

Meet the specialists

Have at least thirteen years experience working with teens, and adults with Anger Control Issues. Have also written a 12 step un-published manuscript regarding Anger Management.

— Dr. Patricia Bell, Psychologist in orlando, FL
 

I have worked with court ordered and self admitted persons in the field of domestic violence and anger management. I was formally trained to address the cycle of violence and expression of anger. I also believe that anger is a secondary emotion that protects the individual from more vulnerable emotions, so part of the therapeutic process is addressing the underlying feelings that exist in the individual and in their relationships.

— Marc Heuser, Counselor in Golden, CO

I am trained and certified as an Anger Management Trainer- Specialist.

— Jeanette De Marshimun, LCSW, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Westchester, IL
 

I am a Certified Anger Management Facilitator (CAMF), a Certified Federal Mediator, and a Certified Divorce/Family Mediator, assisting individual in identifying the source of anger, and working toward conflict resolution.

— Dr. Vicki D. Coleman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Las Vegas, NV

Stress can often lead to frustration and anger. How we cope with our anger determines our outcomes personally, professionally and in our relationships. Understanding anger and how to manage it becomes vital to our daily survival.

— zarna shah, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Williston Park, NY
 

When we talk about Anger, one of the first things to come up is “fight” or “flight.” This is an instinctive response to a threatening situation, that readies one to either become forceful or to run. This is a response in our body’s, built in defense system, to handle a threat. Getting to know what triggers your anger and how you react can help you manage it in a positive way.

— Patricia L Sellers, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Claremont, CA

I work with individuals to understand the myths about anger, to break the anger habit, to learn how to monitor and manage anger, to identify events that trigger anger and to develop strategies to prevent anger.

— Stephen Morris, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX
 

Irritability and anger is often triggered by anxiety, relationship difficulties, job stress, feeling unappreciated/disrespected, and/or insomnia. Identifying the underlying cause of your anger is the first step in understanding and managing your anger. I help to treat anger at its root cause, by challenging the cognitive distortions associated with your anger.

— Kirsten Hardy, Clinical Social Worker

Anger. It's something that a lot of us deal with- whether it's from you or from someone you care for and you just happen to be in the "Backblast Area". It effects us in some pretty major ways, like- 1. "Road Rage" 2. Snapping at family members/friends/co-workers 3. Thinking "People piss me off because they're stupid" 4. Feeling impatient with people then later wondering "Why did I do that?" Let's talk about those situations and figure out what to do about it.

— Donald McCasland, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

Anger can arise from many different sources. In our society, we are taught to stuff emotions and when we don't acknowledge them and work through them, the emotions can re-emerge at a later date, often in inappropriate ways. When clients meet with me we discuss how they are currently exhibiting anger as well as when they first started having anger outbursts. Often, the origin may be years or even decades old. When that initiating event is worked through, the anger can be released.

— Diana Sturm, Counselor in Mobile, AL

We work together to help you understand how your brain is functioning to achieve behavior change. Anger is brain function that is normally a response to fear. Adrenaline that is a hormone is released in the bodies tissues, that put the body into "fight or flight." When this happens, the front of the brain does not have the ability to control your emotions and your are out of control.

— Patricia L Sellers, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Claremont, CA
 

Anger is an emotion. The difference is that anger can lead to aggression (shout out to those that thought I would say hate; #yoda). My approach to anger takes a look at how we express this emotion and how frequently it turns into aggression. By understanding the cause of anger, how it manifests and how often it becomes aggression, we begin to build a foundation that allows the experience of emotions in a healthier, more sustainable way.

— MICHAEL ROSE, Licensed Professional Counselor in ,

When we talk about Anger, one of the first things to come up is “fight” or “flight.” This is an instinctive response to a threatening situation, that readies one to either become forceful or to run. This is a response in our body’s, built in defense system, to handle a threat. Getting to know what triggers your anger and how you react can help you manage it in a positive way.

— Patricia L Sellers, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Claremont, CA
 

I have worked with court ordered, and self admitted people in the areas of anger management and domestic violence. During treatment we look at strategies for self awareness around the expressions of anger, and examine healthy relationships. Also it is believed that anger is a secondary emotion that often avoids the more vulnerable feelings. So in our work together, we create safety to address the root, and not only expressions of anger and rage.

— Marc Heuser, Counselor in Golden, CO