Feminist Therapy

Feminist therapy is a therapeutic approach grounded in feminist theory and philosophy. Central to this approach is the idea that women may experience mental health issues as a result of psychological oppression. In feminist therapy, the therapist and client are equals – the therapist's knowledge of psychology and the client's knowledge of herself come together to embrace the client's strengths. Feminist therapists seek to recognize and understand the client's socioeconomic and political situation, and are typically personally invested in ending oppression, empowering women and girls, and working toward social change. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s feminist therapy specialists today.

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Having a feminist approach to therapy means I believe you to be the expert of your experience. It means I am affirming of marginalized identities, and am interested in building a relationship with you that has a balanced power dynamic. Having a feminist orientation to psychotherapy also means that I have done my own work around my intersectional identities as a white, cis-gendered, able-bodied, queer femme person.

— Mackenzie Studebaker, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist

I approach counseling from a Relational-Cultural perspective which is a feminist lens that focuses on developing a positive relationship between you and me to help support the client making positive changes in their life. This growth-fostering relationship can be used as a model to improve all other relationships in the client's life. I will be striving to create a positive connection with you and I will be encouraging you to assess your past relationships and how they may impact you now.

— Carly Stevens, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

I approach my work from a social justice lens, always considering the importance of intersectional oppression in psychological distress.

— Augustin Kendall, Counselor in Minneapolis, MN

Modern feminist therapy is not just for women. It seeks to address the concerns of all who have been impacted by systems of oppression (Black, Indigenous, & People of Color, LGBQTIA+, those who are Neurodivergent, Disabled individuals, etc). In order to understand & help those who have been marginalized we must understand those systems & work to dismantle them. I recognize that as a white person who presents as a cisgender heteronormative female, I have unearned privilege.

— Jennifer Dolphin, Licensed Professional Counselor in Anchorage, AK
 

You are the expert of yourself; I'm here to support you with my training and skills to assist you in uncovering the answers within. I use an intersectional approach and recognize there are many factors and layers to your life, and when we can examine all aspects of our identity we move toward accepting ourselves as we are. I am committed to being an inclusive, anti-racist practitioner and do not shy away from discussing relevant social justice topics as they may arise within therapy.

— Shelby Dwyer, Counselor in Boston, MA

We will discuss your concerns within the context of your life. We'll work together to uncover/highlight your strengths, empower you to make the changes you desire, and help you connect more deeply to your authentic self, all within a supportive, non-judgmental space.

— Shelby Dwyer, Counselor in Boston, MA
 

My path as a human has been formed by feminist theorists and writers. I particularly relished discovering the "Backlash" feminism of Faludi, as well as writings by Black feminists from Audre Lord to Sonya Renee Taylor. Joanna Bird is another therapist and writer who has influenced my work as a feminist counselor: addressing issues of power both in the therapy relationship and the wider world, and working from a position of mutuality.

— Kirsti Reeve, Licensed Professional Counselor in Ferndale, MI

My therapy is feminist in nature because I am always looking through the lens of feminism and anti-oppression when working with clients. For my clients who strongly identify as feminist, having a feminist therapist means you're not starting from scratch in explaining your worldview. For people who are less focused on feminism, I can help you see angles to your situation that you might not have noticed.

— Ashley Hamm, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX
 

My therapy is always sensitive to issues of power, privilege, and oppression along many dimensions, not just gender. I approach feminism from an intersectional perspective, and am mindful of my own privileged identities as well. I take a collaborative, curious approach with all clients and recognize clients' expertise on their own lives.

— Sheila Addison, Counselor in Oakland, CA

We are all connected to one another other, and we try to live a liberated life within hidden systems of inequity. Whether you consider yourself to be privileged or marginalized, the reality is we are all a part of oppressive structures we were born into, and this effects our ability to thrive. What can we do about this? Feminist therapy recognizes systems of power, and the harm they cause, centering transparency, empowerment, and the importance of the interpersonal as paths to freedom.

— Jackie Kosak, Art Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

Feminist therapy is a set of related therapies arising from what proponents see as a disparity between the origin of most psychological theories and the majority of people seeking counseling being female. It focuses on societal, cultural, and political causes and solutions to issues faced in the counseling process.

— Monica Manuel, Licensed Professional Counselor in Atlanta, GA

Feminist therapy isn't just for women! It is a modality that focuses on client issues through the lens of the client's experience and context, both personal and social/political/cultural; therefore it works well for clients of all kinds of identities! Diverse perspectives are encouraged/supported and the therapy relationship is more egalitarian to minimize the power differential. In other words, I work alongside my clients to help them work through their difficulties in a strengths-based way.

— Erin Shapiro, Licensed Professional Counselor in Dallas, TX
 

Feminist therapy isn't just for women! It is a modality that focuses on client issues through the lens of the client's experience and context, both personal and social/political/cultural. Diverse perspectives are encouraged/supported and the therapy relationship is more egalitarian to minimize the power differential. In other words, I work alongside my clients to help them work through their difficulties in a strengths-based way.

— Erin Shapiro, Licensed Professional Counselor in Dallas, TX

I was there at the beginning of the feminist therapy movement in the 1970's in Berkeley, CA. I remember working with other women to discover what a feminist approach to crisis/rape counseling might involve. My doctoral dissertation was a feminist analysis of women who attempt suicide. This was at a time when there was almost no research on why women made more attempts than men.

— Karin Wandrei, Clinical Social Worker in Rohnert Park, CA
 

I am well-trained in feminist psychotherapeutic practice with members of the queer community, racial/ethnic minority populations, and with women/womxn.

— Sam Naimi, Psychotherapist in West Hollywood, CA

Feminism and a commitment to social justice guide my work. I consult the DSM and provide a diagnosis when appropriate (usually when you need to submit a superbill for reimbursement), but I find that more frequently the issues clients face are the result of systemic oppression rather than a personal problem.

— Christina (Christy) Reichert, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Vancouver, WA
 

Therapists in our practice believe in using a collaborative approach to therapy. While we have knowledge coming from our own education and experiences, you have expertise in your life. We work to create a collaborative environment where you are working on your goals based on what you need and want for yourself.

— Karen Rothstein Pineda, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Oak Park, IL

Power dynamics within the therapeutic relationship as well as society at large matter. We cannot ignore the systemic and environmental contexts in which we all live. I respect and honor your expertise on yourself and your world. I am here as a guide to help you heal, not as an expert to "fix." Collaborative and empowering are my most authentic ways to work with others.

— Desiree Howell, Psychologist in St. Petersburg, FL
 

I practice from an intersectional feminist lens, meaning that I take into account how all the parts of your identity (race, sexual orientation, size, faith, roles you occupy, etc.) impact your individual experience of being a woman, including your experiences of oppression. I consider you the expert on you, and me the expert on psychology, and together we partner to combine our expertise in the service of your goals. I seek to empower you to make your own best decisions according to your values.

— Linda Baggett, Psychologist in Manhattan Beach, CA