Interpersonal Therapy (IPT)

Interpersonal therapy, or IPT, is a short-term, focused treatment for mood disorders, such as depression. Rooted in attachment and communication theories, IPT is designed to help people address current concerns and improve interpersonal relationships. IPT is based on the principle that relationships and life events impact mood and that the reverse is also true. Treatment follows a highly structured and time-limited approach and seldom lasts longer than 16 weeks. The goal of IPT is to rapidly reduce symptoms. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s interpersonal therapy specialists today.

Meet the specialists

I was trained to use this modality under the supervision of Ivy League doctoral supervisors at USC. I have practiced this modality at all institutions I have been employed.

— Steven Su, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Fullerton, CA
 

I want to lend an unbiased ear to anyone who is in need of help. I would love to help you achieve, overcome, and challenge any barriers that may hinder your wellness and growth.

— Nicole Rooth, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Rochelle Park, NJ

I was trained to use this modality under the supervision of Ivy League doctoral supervisors at USC. I have practiced this modality at all institutions I have been employed.

— Steven Su, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Fullerton, CA
 

In therapy, my goal is to create a safe and welcoming environment where clients can be themselves. I aim to support clients as they share the aspects of their lives they are unhappy with and offer caring exploration along the way. Through an approach of understanding and insight, I work to help clients live healthier and more satisfying lives.

— Whitney Showler, Marriage & Family Therapist in Culver City, CA

In therapy, my goal is to create a safe and welcoming environment where clients can be themselves. I aim to support clients as they share the aspects of their lives they are unhappy with and offer caring exploration along the way. Through an approach of understanding and insight, I work to help clients live healthier and more satisfying lives.

— Whitney Showler, Marriage & Family Therapist in Culver City, CA
 

I have taken intensive training courses to increase my experience and knowledge with interpersonal psychotherapy. So much of who we are and how we function is dictated by how we relate and connect with those around us. Utilizing the IPT approach allows us to work to identify areas of difficulty related to the relationships in a client's life and how these are impacting current life.

— Elise Trim, Social Worker in Wyoming, MI

Interpersonal therapy looks at early attachment, family dynamics, thoughts, and other aspects of how people develop and maintain relationships. It explains behaviors and symptoms through the lens of people trying to manage emotions and relationships through the use of less than helpful coping skills. IPT says that when you work on making interpersonal relationships healthier, you do not need to rely on the symptoms and behaviors that are controlling your life.

— Joy Zelikovsky, Psychologist
 

Many people come to therapy because of problems in their relationships with others--such as partners, parents, children, relatives, bosses, classmates, and co-workers. We can't change these people, but we can change how we respond to them. In interpersonal therapy, we explore your relationship patterns, and try out new ways of communicating and expressing your needs.

— Lilyan Moore, Counselor in Portland, OR

My work with interpersonal relationships come from a variety of resources, but also uses a Systems approach which is primarily process oriented. All behavior can be seen as relevant communication meaning and relationship. Relationships involve content and process, but process is key in terms of getting and receiving messages, as well as, maintaining a healthy Rrelationship.

— M. Douglas Evans, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Ann Arbor, MI
 

So what even is Interpersonal Therapy? It is a form of therapy that focuses on you and your relationships with others. The idea is that by examining and improving the quality of relationships with others, we can improve our mental wellbeing. We can improve our relationships with others and ourselves by teasing out the patterns we use in relationships and switching to more helpful patterns. Give me a call to see how you can benefit from this.

— Coral Sanchez, Associate Professional Counselor in Newport Beach, CA

Through an interpersonal lens, I am focused on the process of our interactions, the dynamics in your relationship with me and others, the ways in which you might have subtle or more significant reactions to things that happen and how to become more aware of those shame triggers, patterns, behaviors, and symptoms to improve your self-awareness, respond gently to practice self-compassion in difficult moments to healing and improve your responses over time.

— Megan Tucker, Psy.D., Psychologist in Providence, RI