Interpersonal Therapy (IPT)

Interpersonal therapy, or IPT, is a short-term, focused treatment for mood disorders, such as depression. Rooted in attachment and communication theories, IPT is designed to help people address current concerns and improve interpersonal relationships. IPT is based on the principle that relationships and life events impact mood and that the reverse is also true. Treatment follows a highly structured and time-limited approach and seldom lasts longer than 16 weeks. The goal of IPT is to rapidly reduce symptoms. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s interpersonal therapy specialists today.

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I incorporate evidence-based approaches including Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Acceptance and Commitment (ACT) Therapy, Interpersonal Therapy, and Cognitive Processing Therapy. Most of us haven’t learned coping skills to help us deal with difficult life circumstances and intense emotions. I promise to listen to you without judging you. You deserve to have a safe place to share your hurt and struggles.

— Emily Crawford-Thompson, Psychologist in COLUMBIA, MO

I believe first and foremost that healing can't happen if you and I don't click, and IPT and other relational therapies form the basis of how I work to try to achieve that. This means I strive to be relatable, talk with you about what is working and what isn't working in our connection, and ideally help you find the space to be truly yourself without criticism or judgment in order to fully explore who you are, where you want to go, and how to get there.

— Linda Louden, Psychologist
 

Through an interpersonal lens, I am focused on the process of our interactions, the dynamics in your relationship with me and others, the ways in which you might have subtle or more significant reactions to things that happen and how to become more aware of those shame triggers, patterns, behaviors, and symptoms to improve your self-awareness, respond gently to practice self-compassion in difficult moments to healing and improve your responses over time.

— addyson Psy.D., Psychologist in Providence, RI

As a branch of CBT-related treatment, IPT is a specialized, time-sensitive intervention meant to build upon treating dysfunctional thought patterns targeted in CBT. As an expert in IPT, the aim is to go the step further in changing problematic, interpersonal behaviors that stem from unhealthy thinking patterns. Over the years, I have utilized this form of psychotherapy to complement specialized treatment approaches for clients with depression, anxiety, and mood disorders alike.

— Ishanie Sanchez, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Staten Island, NY
 

Interpersonal Psychotherapy aims to target struggles with role transitions, interpersonal deficits/disputes, and unresolved grief for a reduction in symptom distress. It is a recommended treatment for mood disorders (i.e. depression, bipolar disorder, etc.), anxiety, and eating disorders.

— Shavonne James, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Long Beach, CA

Interpersonal Therapy is a unique approach to individual therapy, which integrates an individual's relational experiences, their thoughts about themselves, and their past familial experiences, to bring about an awareness of how these three domains impact a person's present circumstances.

— Linda L Vance, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
 

I believe first and foremost that healing can't happen if you and I don't click, and IPT and other relational therapies form the basis of how I work to try to achieve that. This means I strive to be relatable, talk with you about what is working and what isn't working in our connection, and ideally help you find the space to be truly yourself without criticism or judgment in order to fully explore who you are, where you want to go, and how to get there.

— Linda Louden, Psychologist

Having studied IPT in graduate school and utilized it both in individual settings and interpersonal groups, I weave concepts and interventions from IPT into every session of therapy and supervision. My use of gentle, direct questions and feedback about interpersonal dynamics in the therapy room helps clients build a sense of safety and trust in the therapeutic relationship as well as reduce power differentials and increase collaboration.

— Miriam Gerber, Clinical Psychologist in St. Paul, MN
 

IPT is a time-limited, focused, evidence-based approach to treat mood disorders and relationship difficulties. The main goal of IPT is to improve the quality of a client's interpersonal relationships and social functioning to help reduce their distress. IPT provides strategies to resolve problems within four key areas including social difficulties, grief/loss, role transitions, and conflict/disputes in relationships.

— Dr. Kathryn Moore Williams, Psychologist in Los Angeles, CA

I work primarily from theoretical perspectives that emphasize the authentic relationships, individual strengths, and the potential for growth. Interpersonal theories direct my attention to my client’s current and past relational dynamics as I strongly believe that human beings are primarily motivated by the need to establish and maintain relationships.

— Aguirre Center for Inclusive Psychotherapy, Psychologist in Atlanta, GA
 

Our world is made up of relationships, and problems with relationships often lead to finding ways to make the world more manageable. Interpersonal Therapy is a way of looking at relationships, thoughts, families and systems that people are a part of, and early attachment to help people understand how they are functioning in the world and why they may use certain coping techniques to manage their world. It can also be a way to examine techniques that are working and how to change what is not.

— Joy Zelikovsky, Psychologist in Milford, CT

In general I would describe my approach as eclectic, as I incorporate many modalities that are tailored to the individual. The common thread in my approach is processing that is enhanced by the quality of the relationship between client and therapist. We will dig deep together to create the changes you are seeking.

— Christine Kotlarski, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in ,
 

I was trained to use this modality under the supervision of Ivy League doctoral supervisors at USC. I have practiced this modality at all institutions I have been employed.

— Steven Su, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Fullerton, CA

My approach to Interpersonal Therapy is ultimately focused on discussing the here-and-now of therapy. How do you feel as we discuss this topic? Does it feel like we are playing out a dynamic that you are experiencing in other points of your life? In taking this approach, my clients and I are able to use the therapy space as a "laboratory" in which the client can try new approaches to other relationships in their lives where they might feel stuck or unfulfilled.

— Robert Ortega, Psychologist in Washington, DC
 

I believe first and foremost that healing can't happen if you and I don't click, and IPT and other relational therapies form the basis of how I work to try to achieve that. This means I strive to be relatable, talk with you about what is working and what isn't working in our connection, and ideally help you find the space to be truly yourself without criticism or judgment in order to fully explore who you are, where you want to go, and how to get there.

— Linda Louden, Psychologist