Interpersonal Therapy (IPT)

Interpersonal therapy, or IPT, is a short-term, focused treatment for mood disorders, such as depression. Rooted in attachment and communication theories, IPT is designed to help people address current concerns and improve interpersonal relationships. IPT is based on the principle that relationships and life events impact mood and that the reverse is also true. Treatment follows a highly structured and time-limited approach and seldom lasts longer than 16 weeks. The goal of IPT is to rapidly reduce symptoms. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s interpersonal therapy specialists today.

Meet the specialists

I was trained to use this modality under the supervision of Ivy League doctoral supervisors at USC. I have practiced this modality at all institutions I have been employed.

— Steven Su, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Fullerton, CA
 

I work primarily from theoretical perspectives that emphasize the authentic relationships, individual strengths, and the potential for growth. Interpersonal theories direct my attention to my client’s current and past relational dynamics as I strongly believe that human beings are primarily motivated by the need to establish and maintain relationships.

— Aguirre Center for Inclusive Psychotherapy, Psychologist in Atlanta, GA

I meet you where you are at in your life and try to get you where you would like to go. You may or may not have a time limit; however you like to work on things in your life at your own pace.

— Ronica Clark, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
 

I am certified in Interpersonal Therapy! This evidence-based treatment is all about developing relationships (both with yourself and others), improving communication, and setting appropriate boundaries. Although this type of therapy isn't as well known as CBT, IPT is very effective in treating depression and anxiety.

— Christopher Schamber, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Sherman Oaks, CA
 

I was trained to use this modality under the supervision of Ivy League doctoral supervisors at USC. I have practiced this modality at all institutions I have been employed.

— Steven Su, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Fullerton, CA

I have taken intensive training courses to increase my experience and knowledge with interpersonal psychotherapy. So much of who we are and how we function is dictated by how we relate and connect with those around us. Utilizing the IPT approach allows us to work to identify areas of difficulty related to the relationships in a client's life and how these are impacting current life.

— Elise Trim, Social Worker in Wyoming, MI
 

Our world is made up of relationships, and problems with relationships often lead to finding ways to make the world more manageable. Interpersonal Therapy is a way of looking at relationships, thoughts, families and systems that people are a part of, and early attachment to help people understand how they are functioning in the world and why they may use certain coping techniques to manage their world. It can also be a way to examine techniques that are working and how to change what is not.

— Joy Zelikovsky, Psychologist

I work primarily from theoretical perspectives that emphasize the authentic relationships, individual strengths, and the potential for growth. Interpersonal theories direct my attention to my client’s current and past relational dynamics as I strongly believe that human beings are primarily motivated by the need to establish and maintain relationships.

— Aguirre Center for Inclusive Psychotherapy, Psychologist in Atlanta, GA
 

I am certified in Interpersonal Therapy! This evidence-based treatment is all about developing relationships (both with yourself and others), improving communication, and setting appropriate boundaries. Although this type of therapy isn't as well known as CBT, IPT is very effective in treating depression and anxiety.

— Christopher Schamber, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Sherman Oaks, CA

IPT is known to be one of the most effective methods of treatment for perinatal mood disorders. IPT helps clients identify sources of their distress and how to alleviate distress. Communication skills that assist in relationship building, strengthening supports and increasing confidence are the primary focus of IPT.

— Kerri-Anne Brown, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Orlando, FL
 

Interpersonal Therapy (IPT) is a form of therapy that was developed to treat depression and focuses on interpersonal relationships. IPT addresses problems in social roles and relationships that may have contributed to the development or maintenance of depression. These problems include the loss of a loved one, disruptions or conflicts in significant relationships, difficulty adapting to changes in relationships or life circumstances, and problems related to interpersonal difficulties.

— Nicholas Moore, Clinical Psychologist

Through an interpersonal lens, I am focused on the process of our interactions, the dynamics in your relationship with me and others, the ways in which you might have subtle or more significant reactions to things that happen and how to become more aware of those shame triggers, patterns, behaviors, and symptoms to improve your self-awareness, respond gently to practice self-compassion in difficult moments to healing and improve your responses over time.

— m. addyson tucker, Psychologist in Providence, RI