Infertility

Experiencing infertility can be incredibly emotionally painful. Challenges with conceiving a child can cause stress and lead to anxiety and depression. A diagnosis of infertility can cause grief, emotional trauma and put strain on your relationships. Seeing a qualified mental health professional when you are struggling with infertility can be very helpful. Therapy can help couples deal with the anger or guilt they may be feeling and it can also help them to explore alternative options – like adoption or fertility treatments – in a safe space. If you are experiencing fertility challenges, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s infertility experts today.

Meet the specialists

I am a member of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. I have taken extensive training in infertility counseling and prenatal, pregnancy, and post natal. I am working towards finalizing my Certification in Perinatal Mental Health. I will provide you guidance and emotional support, while offering information and resources to help you make the reproductive decisions that are right for you and your family. Care tailored to your unique parenthood journey is available.

— julie casperson, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Asheville, NC
 

I have specialized training in infertility through the American Society of Reproductive Medicine.

— Martine Jones, Psychologist in Asheville, NC

I have a specialty in grief and loss and a certification in expressive arts, I have found ways to work with those facing infertility to help on the road to healing. I was trained by the American Society of Reproductive Medicine in Mental Health, have completed the County of San Diego adoption program. and work with those going through IVF, surrogacy or facing challenges around women's health.

— Michelle North, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encinitas, CA
 

I have specialized training in infertility through the American Society of Reproductive Medicine.

— Martine Jones, Psychologist in Asheville, NC

Trying to function in day-to-day life while struggling to conceive can be immensely stressful & anxiety-provoking. With compassion, sensitivity, & a breadth of knowledge about the infertility experience, I assist people grappling with diagnosis, treatment options, & decision-making about alternative family building. Together, we will identify strengths, work to diminish anxiety and bolster positive coping skills. I encourage self advocacy, healthy communication, & thoughtful decision making.

— Sara Okman, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

Having gone through some infertility issues myself I have a deeper understanding on how this affects not only how a woman feels about herself but how it can also affect the marriage. This can cause feelings of shame, guilt, and inferiority in both men and women. Because I have gone through this I have a unique perspective on not only what t feels like but how to move through it and heal.

— Kristi Sanford, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Menifee, CA

Helping individuals and couples through the difficulties of trying to conceive.

— Elizabeth Camargo Garcia, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA
 

I support individuals and couples who are experiencing fertility concerns. There is support out there for you to learn and grow through your experience and find what family means to you.

— Heather Douglas, Clinical Social Worker in Charlotte, NC

I have a passion to help women overcome some of the difficulties and challenges within infertility, pregnancy loss and postpartum care. Infertility often leads to a plethora of conflicting emotions that are difficult to fully understand, even within oneself. It can feel isolating and full of despair and grief over things that are not yet tangible. I also know how much of a blow trying to conceive can have on a relationship. The romance can fizzle quickly and intimacy can often feel mechanical.

— Shana McGehee, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Bel Air, MD
 

I have a passion to help women overcome some of the difficulties and challenges within infertility, pregnancy loss and postpartum care. Infertility often leads to a plethora of conflicting emotions that are difficult to fully understand, even within oneself. It can feel isolating and full of despair and grief over things that are not yet tangible. I also know how much of a blow trying to conceive can have on a relationship. The romance can fizzle quickly and intimacy can often feel mechanical.

— Shana McGehee, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Bel Air, MD

I run an infertility support group, completed an independent study on gestational surrogacy, and have completed mental health trainings dedicated to ART. Personal experience heightens my empathy for those managing the complex crisis of infertility.

— Lexi Garber, Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY
 

While on the infertility rollercoaster, you may feel isolated, hopeless, frustrated and anxious. You may feel as though you have pressed the pause button and can no longer focus on other parts of your world. I am here to help you navigate, process and learn to manage the distress infertility has caused in your life. You can reclaim control of your own life, while pursuing the dream of creating a new one.

— Stacy Karp Mosher, Counselor in Portland, ME

Infertility impacts 6.1 million couples in the United States or close to 1 in 6 couples. You may feel very isolated and alone during this time but literally millions of other couples are or have been in a similar position as you. Infertility is devastating and often is accompanied by pregnancy losses or a stillbirth experience. Infertility takes many couples on an emotional roller coaster while trying to start or grow a family.

— Jennifer Perera, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Cranford, NJ
 

I have specialized training in infertility through the American Society of Reproductive Medicine.

— Martine Jones, Psychologist in Asheville, NC

I have worked with many straight and queer families for whom parenthood is the only thing in their lives they have not been able to achieve by setting their minds to it. Infertility can provoke extreme grief and can hold life at a standstill. It can wreck havoc on a relationship and leave partners unsure of how to create a future going forward. Therapy can be critical to finding the way. Please see my page on infertility on my website at https://www.taranoonesocialworker.com/infertility.html

— Tara Noone, Social Worker in Albany, CA
 

I run an infertility support group, completed an independent study on gestational surrogacy, and have completed mental health trainings dedicated to ART. Personal experience heightens my empathy for those managing the complex crisis of infertility.

— Lexi Garber, Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY