Adoption Issues

Navigating the complexities of adoption can be tough – both for the adoptive parents and the adopted child. Adoptive children and their new families may encounter anxiety, tension or stress. Children, even those who are adopted into caring homes, can experience conflicted feelings about being given up for adoption. Additionally, for parents working towards adoption, the system can seem impossible to get through. A mental health professional who specializes in adoption can be a great asset in helping a family sort through adoption-related issues. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today!

Meet the specialists

As an adoptee myself, I have a deep passion for working with adults who have been adopted or experienced foster care. Adoption is not a single event in a person’s life, it is an ongoing event as it continues to impact the lives of those involved. Questions and intense emotions can surface when life events such as health concerns, finding and interacting with biological family members, the start or end of a relationship, the birth of a child, or the loss of a parent are may be complicated or deeply significant.

— Kimberley Mead, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX
 

If you are adopted, it is likely the experience of being adopted is one of the most significant influences in your life. Many adults who were adopted as infants or young children, and were loved, accepted and valued by their adoptive families, still struggle with feelings of loneliness, sadness, anxiety, grief and fear of loss, despite the experience of having loving adoptive parents and families. It seems that even with a wholesome family experience, the primal separation and loss that is a part of every adoption experience can fuel many anxieties in adoptees, especially fears of loss and abandonment and confusion about identity. Being adopted can influence a person throughout their lives. It is common for these influences to appear – or reappear. If you are seeking support to explore and process the impact of adoption in your life, having a therapist who understands both personally and professionally can be especially reassuring and meaningful. I am here to help.

— Rawna Romero, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Alameda, CA

An adoptive mom with over 10 years of professional experience as an adoption caseworker for a nonprofit adoption agency, I work with birth parents, adoptive parents, and adoptees and help each explore identity issues, relationship concerns, and reunification. Open adoption, closed adoption, private adoption, foster care — we explore the issues that clients have when they walk through my door.

— Amy Shore, Counselor in Sugar Land, TX
 

I have a sub-specialty in Post-Adoption Family Therapy. I bring numerous years of working with children in the foster care and adoption field to my private practice work as a family therapist. I appreciate the fact that adoption is a life-long issue. It is not uncommon for families who have adopted children to experience conflicts with their adopted child or in the adjustment of the family, years after the adoption has been finalized. At this point, I can help parents and families get things back on track, keeping in mind the history and experiences of everyone involved.

— S. Abigail McCarrel, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Arcadia, CA
 

For some, adoption is the very first choice for family building. For others, adoption is a second choice after infertility, one which they may struggle to embrace. There are considerations that come up in adoption more or less universally and some that apply specifically to people coming to adoption after infertility. I have worked with all members of the adoption triad both pre- and post-adoption. Please see my page on adoption on my website at https://www.taranoonesocialworker.com/adoption

— Tara Noone, Social Worker in Berkeley, CA

If you are adopted, it is likely the experience of being adopted is one of the most significant influences in your life. Many adults who were adopted as infants or young children, and were loved, accepted and valued by their adoptive families, still struggle with feelings of melancholy, grief and fear of loss, or are anxious about their capacity to belong, despite the experience of having loving adoptive parents and families. It seems that even with a wholesome family experience, the primal separation and loss that is a part of every adoption experience can fuel many anxieties in adoptees, especially fears of loss and abandonment and confusion about identity. Being adopted can influence a person throughout their lives. It is common for these influences to appear – or reappear. If you are seeking support to explore and process the impact of adoption in your life, having a therapist who understands both personally and professionally can be especially helpful. I'd like to help.

— Rawna Romero, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Alameda, CA