Adoption Issues

Navigating the complexities of adoption can be tough – both for the adoptive parents and the adopted child. Adoptive children and their new families may encounter anxiety, tension or stress. Children, even those who are adopted into caring homes, can experience conflicted feelings about being given up for adoption. Additionally, for parents working towards adoption, the system can seem impossible to get through. A mental health professional who specializes in adoption can be a great asset in helping a family sort through adoption-related issues. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today!

Meet the specialists

As an adult adoptee, I've personally navigated complexities related to the adoption narrative. I wrote the book, "This is Why I Was Adopted: Navigating Loss on a Journey Toward Hope" to address those issues with the adoption community. https://therapyredeemed.wordpress.com/resources/

— Cameron Small, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Minneapolis, MN
 

Families break and form in many ways, I have worked in the field of adoption hearing the voices of adoptees, birth parents, siblings, adoptive parents and many other folks in the adoption constellation and can bring a nuanced compassion to the challenges families individual face. Together we can name and transform painful experiences, such as: addressing race in transracial families, navigating search for bio parents, belonging, advocating for truth and respect, etc.

— Silvia Gozzini, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in PORTLAND, OR
 

As an adoptive parent and member of an extended birth family in reunion, I bring my own experiences and sensitivity to the task of providing adoptees, adoptive parents, and birth family members the support they need to tackle the complex issues inherent in adoption. I provide support groups, individual consultations on adoption-related issues, parenting coaching, and ongoing psychotherapy. I work primarily with teens and adults, both adoptees, first family and those parenting adopted children.

— Amy Hecht, Clinical Psychologist in Charlotte, NC

I approach foster and adoption through a trauma-informed lens and view supporting the entire family system as key for stability and success. I have completed certification training in family therapy for foster/adoption through PSU and DHS. I understand the impact that attachment trauma has on the family system, and the importance of working together to build a healthy and thriving family.

— L. Simone D'Amore, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I understand that the adoption process can be complex and overwhelming at times. I've worked with families and individuals throughout their adoption journey. I can provide counseling to prospective/adoptive families, birth parents, and adoptees.

— Addie King, Licensed Professional Counselor in Brick, NJ

I became a therapist to work with adoptive families. As an advocate for youth in foster care, I learned about child welfare in Oregon. After grad school, I was certified in therapy with adoptive & foster families. I now lead workshops for foster parents & adoption staff. ~75% of my practice is with clients touched by adoption, including kids and adults adopted at any age, adoptive parents, and birth parents. Open adoption, grief work, identity, and search & reunion are common topics.

— MereAnn Reid, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR
 

As an adoptive parent myself, I know firsthand the continuing challenges and incredible rewards of adopting a child. Parents often face hurdles unique to the adoption process, and they don't even know it. Adopted children often face challenges at different phases of their lives and at different levels of severity. I will work with your whole family to sort these issues out and manage them so that everyone maintains their best, healthiest life.

— Michele Teitelbaum, Counselor in Redondo Beach, CA

As an adoptee myself, I have a deep passion for working with adults who have been adopted or experienced foster care. Adoption is not a single event in a person’s life, it is an ongoing event as it continues to impact the lives of those involved. Questions and intense emotions can surface when life events such as health concerns, finding and interacting with biological family members, the start or end of a relationship, the birth of a child, or the loss of a parent are may be complicated or deeply significant.

— Kimberley Mead, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX
 

For some, adoption is the very first choice for family building. For others, adoption is a second choice after infertility, one which they may struggle to embrace. There are considerations that come up in adoption more or less universally and some that apply specifically to people coming to adoption after infertility. I have worked with all members of the adoption triad both pre- and post-adoption. Please see my page on adoption on my website at https://www.taranoonesocialworker.com/adoption

— Tara Noone, Social Worker in Berkeley, CA

I have over 6 years of experience working as a Children's worker in a County Adoption Agency. I worked closely with adoptive children and their birth parents, and adopting parents. I have experience and understanding of the adoption process, including the psychological loss, grieve and guilt.

— Jaimi Martin, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in San Diego, CA
 

Learn how to connect better with others and become the self you have inside. An adopted child is a child that has experienced a loss. A child who as been adopted can grow up without any understanding of what they experienced or what it has done to them. When we experience a childhood loss it can often lead us living our life as in another loss or trauma is just around the corner. Threw adult adoption therapy we help you put the past in the past.

— Dr. Shoshana Aal, Counselor in Denver, CO

While working with children in foster care, I had the pleasure of serving on multidisciplinary teams in which I assisted with identifying and interviewing the potential adoptive parents of my clients. I implemented interventions to assist with preparing my clients for adoptive placement and all related issues with adjustment that presented. I also assessed relationship dynamics, appropriateness of placement, and provided skill teaching during therapeutic visits with potential adoptive families.

— Drionne Arney, Counselor in Tallahassee, FL

I have extensive experience working with families and youth who have either been in the foster care system or who have been within their families as an adopted child since birth. I enjoy working with families, youth, and children (8+) who need further support in understanding how to navigate though attachment issues that the family may encounter. I also enjoy working with adults who have been adopted and struggle with identity development as they navigate through the world after leaving home.

— Ashante Taylorcox, Associate Professional Counselor in Marlton, NJ
 

Adoption is both a personal and professional interest of mine. While adoption is regarded by many as a positive experience, I understand that for some, adoption can also leave behind deep and complicated wounds which may impact how you relate to yourself and others. I can work with you to help you understand these wounds, how they affect you, and how you can start to heal from them.

— Meredith Hrebenak, Licensed Professional Counselor in Canton, GA

Because I am adopted, I am intimately familiar with the early attachment injury that, on some level, invariably accompanies adoptees, although for most of my life I believed that my adoption had no effect on me. Through my own process, I have become aware of how those early, pre-verbal messages from before birth and in early development live in the body and in the older, more primitive parts of the brain.

— Wendy Dingee, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Las Vegas, NV
 

I have a sub-specialty in Post-Adoption Family Therapy. I bring numerous years of working with children in the foster care and adoption field to my private practice work as a family therapist. I appreciate the fact that adoption is a life-long issue. It is not uncommon for families who have adopted children to experience conflicts with their adopted child or in the adjustment of the family, years after the adoption has been finalized. At this point, I can help parents and families get things back on track, keeping in mind the history and experiences of everyone involved.

— S. Abigail McCarrel, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Arcadia, CA

The separation between you and your birth family can lead to a deep sense of abandonment, rejection, loss, confusion, identity issues, guilt/shame, and issues with control. It can also leave you vulnerable with a strong desire to search for acceptance and a sense of belonging often in unhealthy places. Without healing this trauma fuels expectations of further abandonments, relationship issues, and addictions. It's time to begin the work of acknowledging how having been adopted has affected you.

— Leanne Lemire, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Phoenix, AZ
 

I am an adoption-competent clinician through the Center for Adoption Support and Education's Training in Adoption Competency program. I serve only clients that have been impacted by adoption in some way- as an adoptive parent, an adoptee or a birth parent.

— Erin Nasmyth, Clinical Social Worker in Charlotte, NC

Families break and form in many ways, I have worked in the field of adoption hearing the voices of adoptees, birth parents, siblings, adoptive parents and many other folks in the adoption constellation and can bring a nuanced compassion to the challenges families individual face. Together we can name and transform painful experiences, such as: addressing race in transracial families, navigating search for bio parents, belonging, advocating for truth and respect, etc.

— Silvia Gozzini, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in PORTLAND, OR

Attachment and trauma are part of adoption yet adoption issues relate more to the impact of adoption itself on identity, self worth, loss and often a journey to connect to your origin story, your first chapter. Each adoptees journey is unique but can also share similar feelings and challenges. These are often not talked about or allowed in an adoptees world. Adoptive parents bring their own histories into parenting and it can be challenging and they can face judgment and unrealistic expectations

— Amy Reamer, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Henrico, VA
 

I am an Adoption Competent therapist through the Florida Department of Children and Families, and have worked with adoptees and adoptive families in all stages of the adoption process.

— Andrea Hartman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Tampa, FL