Adoption Issues

Navigating the complexities of adoption can be tough – both for the adoptive parents and the adopted child. Adoptive children and their new families may encounter anxiety, tension or stress. Children, even those who are adopted into caring homes, can experience conflicted feelings about being given up for adoption. Additionally, for parents working towards adoption, the system can seem impossible to get through. A mental health professional who specializes in adoption can be a great asset in helping a family sort through adoption-related issues. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today!

Meet the specialists

 

I have had extensive training as a foster parent and fostered and then adopted my two children. In addition, I have worked with many families struggling with issues from adoption.

— Candice Lawhorn, Counselor in Pelham, AL

I became a therapist to work with adoptive families. As an advocate for youth in foster care, I learned about child welfare in Oregon. After grad school, I was certified in therapy with adoptive & foster families. I now lead workshops for foster parents & adoption staff. ~75% of my practice is with clients touched by adoption, including kids and adults adopted at any age, adoptive parents, and birth parents. Open adoption, grief work, identity, and search & reunion are common topics.

— MereAnn Reid, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR
 

As an adoptive parent and counselor I understand the challenges faced in blending a family through adoption. I can work with you and your children on issues of grief and loss, identity formation, and attachment in blending your family.

— William Hemphill, Licensed Professional Counselor in Norcross, GA

Children who have been adopted or placed in foster care often experiences unique challenges, as do their parents and caregivers! I have specialized experience in helping families all along the adoption and permanency spectrum in order to help parents and caregivers better understand their children, to help children learn to cope and integrate their adoption or foster care story, and to support families to become more cohesive.

— Clara Rivers, Clinical Social Worker in Roseville, MN
 

I approach foster and adoption through a trauma-informed lens and view supporting the entire family system as key for stability and success. I have completed certification training in family therapy for foster/adoption through PSU and DHS. I understand the impact that attachment trauma has on the family system, and the importance of working together to build a healthy and thriving family.

— L. Simone D'Amore, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

I have extensive experience working with families and youth who have either been in the foster care system or who have been within their families as an adopted child since birth. I enjoy working with families, youth, and children (8+) who need further support in understanding how to navigate though attachment issues that the family may encounter. I also enjoy working with adults who have been adopted and struggle with identity development as they navigate through the world after leaving home.

— Ashante Taylorcox, Associate Professional Counselor in Marlton, NJ
 

I am an adoption-competent clinician through the Center for Adoption Support and Education's Training in Adoption Competency program. I serve only clients that have been impacted by adoption in some way- as an adoptive parent, an adoptee or a birth parent.

— Erin Nasmyth, Clinical Social Worker in Charlotte, NC

I am an Adoption Competent therapist through the Florida Department of Children and Families, and have worked with adoptees and adoptive families in all stages of the adoption process.

— Andrea Hartman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Tampa, FL
 

Being part of the adoption triad can be complicated. There can be an extraordinary amount of love, but there is also a huge amount of loss. Many adopted kids feel the loss, but don't understand it nor know how to articulate it. Who am I? Why was I given up? We discuss these issues in a loving and safe space. Working with the parents helps them understand their child's struggles and learn that this is not a rejection of their love, but a necessary part of the adoption process.

— Laurie Levine, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Herndon, VA

As an adoption counselors I work with adoptees, birth parents and adoptive families to help them understand and cope with the emotions surrounding adoption. Adoption can have a deep impact. The better an adoption is handled at all stages, the more likely it is to form a healthy family.

— Dana Philossaint, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Summerville, GA

I work with all members of the adoption triad. I am especially familiar with the identity issues, challenges, and systemic/cultural oppression's experienced by members of the triad. Society has expectations for the role that don't always fit how it actually feels to be in the role. Members of the triad can feel lost, isolated and alone due to the difficulty finding a support community within our society.

— Regina Faridnia, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Granite Bay, CA
 

Learn how to connect better with others and become the self you have inside. An adopted child is a child that has experienced a loss. A child who as been adopted can grow up without any understanding of what they experienced or what it has done to them. When we experience a childhood loss it can often lead us living our life as in another loss or trauma is just around the corner. In adult adoption therapy we work together to help you put the past in the past.

— Dr. Shoshana Aal, Counselor in Denver, CO

I have been working with individuals and couples since 2001 who have infertility issues, are seeking to adopt, needing support regarding adoption issues, and birth parent(s) who are in the decision making phase. Knowing that you have support and expert guidance is important as you navigate these important life moments. I have worked with neonatal hospitals, adoption agencies, and foster care agencies and have provided subject matter expertise to assist clients while navigating these issues.

— Dr. Shawna Haley, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Jacksonville, FL
 

Attachment and trauma are part of adoption yet adoption issues relate more to the impact of adoption itself on identity, self worth, loss and often a journey to connect to your origin story, your first chapter. Each adoptees journey is unique but can also share similar feelings and challenges. These are often not talked about or allowed in an adoptees world. Adoptive parents bring their own histories into parenting and it can be challenging and they can face judgment and unrealistic expectations

— Amy Reamer, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Henrico, VA

Learn how to connect better with others and become the self you have inside. An adopted child is a child that has experienced a loss. A child who as been adopted can grow up without any understanding of what they experienced or what it has done to them. When we experience a childhood loss it can often lead us living our life as in another loss or trauma is just around the corner. Threw adult adoption therapy we help you put the past in the past.

— Dr. Shoshana Aal, Counselor in Denver, CO
 

I understand that the adoption process can be complex and overwhelming at times. I've worked with families and individuals throughout their adoption journey. I can provide counseling to prospective/adoptive families, birth parents, and adoptees.

— Addie King, Licensed Professional Counselor in Brick, NJ

I have over 6 years of experience working as a Children's worker in a County Adoption Agency. I worked closely with adoptive children and their birth parents, and adopting parents. I have experience and understanding of the adoption process, including the psychological loss, grieve and guilt.

— Jaimi Martin, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in San Diego, CA

Being a part of a family who adopted a child, I have a unique perspective on how adoption can affect each participant in the process. Adoption can elicit joy and grief, fulfillment and loss, connection and isolation. I work with adoptive parents, adopted children, and first families to help process the impact of adoption and promote healing and growth for everyone involved. I wrote my master's thesis on adoption and developed a therapy group to help adopted children.

— Julianne Fox, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Walnut Creek, CA
 

Adoption involves trauma and working through abandonment and attachment issues. In a nonjudgemental and empathic environment, I assist you in developing your sense of self out of hard circumstances.

— Dr. Jill Klingler, Psychologist in Cincinnati, OH

Being a part of a family who adopted a child, I have a unique perspective on how adoption can affect each participant in the process. Adoption can elicit joy and grief, fulfillment and loss, connection and isolation. I work with adoptive parents, adopted children, and first families to help process the impact of adoption on each individual.

— Julianne Fox, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Walnut Creek, CA
 

Because I am adopted, I am intimately familiar with the early attachment injury that, on some level, invariably accompanies adoptees, although for most of my life I believed that my adoption had no effect on me. Through my own process, I have become aware of how those early, pre-verbal messages from before birth and in early development live in the body and in the older, more primitive parts of the brain.

— Wendy Dingee, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Las Vegas, NV

As an adoptee myself, I have a deep passion for working with adults who have been adopted or experienced foster care. Adoption is not a single event in a person’s life, it is an ongoing event as it continues to impact the lives of those involved. Questions and intense emotions can surface when life events such as health concerns, finding and interacting with biological family members, the start or end of a relationship, the birth of a child, or the loss of a parent are may be complicated or deeply significant.

— Kimberley Mead, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX
 

I worked as an adoption social worker for 12 years, and also have 3 children through foster care, so I understand both personally and professionally the challenges of adoptive parenting. I also have been certified as an expert in attachment theory and have worked with many children with attachment issues and Reactive Attachment Disorder.

— Lisa Wittorff, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR

I work with adopted and foster children, teens, and adults. I am an adoptee myself and have specialized training to serve this community from my participation in Portland State University's Foster and Adoption Therapy Certificate Program.

— Sprout Therapy PDX, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Expectation of adopted parents vs reality, assembled families: difficulties and possibilities. For adopted people, finding their identity, loyalty, and questions that might not have answers.

— mariana iurcovich, Psychologist in Boulder, CO

I approach foster and adoption through a trauma-informed lens and view supporting the entire family system as key for stability and success. I have completed certification training in family therapy for foster/adoption through PSU and DHS. I understand the impact that attachment trauma has on the family system, and the importance of working together to build a healthy and thriving family.

— L. Simone D'Amore, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR