Depression

Depression is a mental health disorder that affects mood, including how you feel, think, and behave. Everyone feels sad sometimes, but when it starts to affect your ability to perform daily tasks and your ability to enjoy things that typically bring you happiness, you may be suffering from depression. The symptoms of depression vary from person to person, but often include feeling miserable without a clear reason why, anxiety, agitation, insomnia or sleeping too much, hopelessness, changes in eating, and/or foggy thinking. Depression may also cause recurrent thoughts of death or suicide (or even a wish that it would all 'stop' in an abstract sense). If you think you might be suffering from depression, a qualified mental health therapist can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s depression experts today!

Meet the specialists

I primarily use Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, mindfulness, and art interventions in the treatment of CBT.

— Melissa Reyerson-Slifer, Mental Health Counselor in Des Moines, IA
 

Many clients come to me with some form of depression. Whether having arisen recently, or as a long-standing pattern in one's life, making certain changes and addressing aspects of one's personal history and perspective can start to relieve depressive symptoms. Though not always indicated or desired, I am comfortable with standard anti-depressant medications and can assist in the decision to start or stop medications with an appropriate referral to a Psychiatrist for medication management. I strongly support alternative therapies for depression as well.

— Bear Korngold, Clinical Psychologist in San Francisco, CA

Depression is just too much for any person to have to live with. It is a disorder that makes you feel like nothing can ever really change, which simply isn't true! If you have been feeling blue more days than not for at least the three weeks, there is a good possibility that you are feeling depressed. You don't need to continue to try to handle this condition on your own. Depression thrives in isolation, so call me today and let me know what is going on. You deserve to be happy.

— Cheryl Deaner, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco,
 

The step-by-step approach we will take together: ​ In the beginning of our work together I will be assessing your overall functioning. We will likely discuss what life was like before your loss, and identify what areas of your life have been directly and indirectly impacted as a result. ​ The next step is to make a plan for treatment together. Grief and depression can often interfere with your ability to meet your basic needs (physiological and safety), which can have a negative ripple effect on your relationships with others, as well as on your self-confidence. We begin by creating a plan based on how severely your symptoms are impacting your daily life. We begin by addressing basic needs and building goals around meeting those needs. ​ We view CBT for grief and depression as having two overarching goals for symptom reduction and our work in therapy: Restore healthy functioning in thoughts, perceptions and beliefs Restore healthy functioning in ability and behavior ​ In trying to meet these goals, we may assign homework to attempt between sessions, and then act as an accountability resource for this homework. This homework will likely include using coping skills we have discussed in session together. We often provide you with a few options for homework assignments, and then empower you to choose the one that seems both doable and still somewhat challenging. In session together, we will discuss how the loss or depression has affected your thoughts and perceptions about yourself, the world and how can function in it. We will work to challenge thoughts and perceptions that may have been negatively skewed by your experience. Examples of these may be: ​ “The whole world is unsafe.” “Everyone is out to get me.” “I will never feel normal/like myself again.” “I’m not worthy of….” “I need this (unhealthy habit) to escape how I feel every day.” ​ As we go along, we will continue to acknowledge and celebrate your successes as well as re-evaluate what parts of treatment are helpful, and what parts of treatment need fine tuning to better meet your needs. Together we will get you back to living the life you deserve.

— Kathryn Richards, Clinical Social Worker in Berkeley, CA

Sometimes the reason why someone becomes depressed is not immediately clear to them. Whereas others will attribute their depression to particular life circumstances: loss of a job, loss of finances, loss of a loved one, physical limitations, illness, aging. Some people report they are depressed because they feel helpless or hopeless about changing some aspect of their life. Others report feeling blocked or stuck in guilt, fear, or shame. Whereas others feel their very existence has no purpose or meaning. Also, it is common in depression not to feel connected to others. These are very valid and real forms of suffering. Through 20+ years of research and clinical practice with thousands of patients, I know just how very serious depression can be. I utilize a tailor made set of proven therapy modalities because everyone is unique with their own history and personality, no two people experience depression in the same exact way.

— Dr. Shawna Freshwater, Clinical Psychologist in Miami Beach, FL
 

The step-by-step approach we will take together: ​ In the beginning of our work together I will be assessing your overall functioning. We will likely discuss what life was like before your loss, and identify what areas of your life have been directly and indirectly impacted as a result. ​ The next step is to make a plan for treatment together. Grief and depression can often interfere with your ability to meet your basic needs (physiological and safety), which can have a negative ripple effect on your relationships with others, as well as on your self-confidence. We begin by creating a plan based on how severely your symptoms are impacting your daily life. We begin by addressing basic needs and building goals around meeting those needs. ​ We view CBT for grief and depression as having two overarching goals for symptom reduction and our work in therapy: Restore healthy functioning in thoughts, perceptions and beliefs Restore healthy functioning in ability and behavior ​ In trying to meet these goals, we may assign homework to attempt between sessions, and then act as an accountability resource for this homework. This homework will likely include using coping skills we have discussed in session together. We often provide you with a few options for homework assignments, and then empower you to choose the one that seems both doable and still somewhat challenging. In session together, we will discuss how the loss or depression has affected your thoughts and perceptions about yourself, the world and how can function in it. We will work to challenge thoughts and perceptions that may have been negatively skewed by your experience. Examples of these may be: ​ “The whole world is unsafe.” “Everyone is out to get me.” “I will never feel normal/like myself again.” “I’m not worthy of….” “I need this (unhealthy habit) to escape how I feel every day.” ​ As we go along, we will continue to acknowledge and celebrate your successes as well as re-evaluate what parts of treatment are helpful, and what parts of treatment need fine tuning to better meet your needs. Together we will get you back to living the life you deserve.

— Anna Lewis, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

Depression affects different people in different ways. Oftentimes, the lack of motivation and sense of hopelessness can lead to significant changes in daily functioning. The goal is to help you get back on your feet in ways that don't feel forced, and to have space to talk freely about the struggles you encounter along the way

— Sweta Venkataramanan, in New York, NY
 

Life can be complex, and when dealing with depression you may find yourself among severe emotional pain with no light at the end of the tunnel. The suffering you are experiencing is very real. I can help you work through the depressive feelings in order to find joy in life.

— Mary Nashed, Counselor in Chapel Hill, NC
 

Living with depression can be immobilizing. It prevents us from doing the things we want, enjoying life and impedes on our relationships. Feeling this way every day is exhausting and also very frightening. Perhaps it's difficult to get out of bed every day, go to work and perform regular daily tasks. Many wonder "what will happen to me?" or "what am I going to do now?" Your healing starts with a small first step and that includes reaching out to me for help and support. After that, we will begin talking about your thoughts, feelings and behaviors to get a clearer understanding about you. Depression really hurts but know that it is treatable and curable, and you can feel better. Let's start your healing today.

— Jan Nelson, Social Worker in NEW YORK, NY

Sometimes the reason why someone becomes depressed is not immediately clear to them. Whereas others will attribute their depression to particular life circumstances: loss of a job, loss of finances, loss of a loved one, physical limitations, illness, aging. Some people report they are depressed because they feel helpless or hopeless about changing some aspect of their life. Others report feeling blocked or stuck in guilt, fear, or shame. Whereas others feel their very existence has no purpose or meaning. Also, it is common in depression not to feel connected to others. These are very valid and real forms of suffering. Through 20+ years of research and clinical practice with thousands of patients, I know just how very serious depression can be. I utilize a tailor made set of proven therapy modalities because everyone is unique with their own history and personality, no two people experience depression in the same exact way.

— Dr. Shawna Freshwater, Clinical Psychologist in Miami Beach, FL
 

Depression is something I have a great deal of experience with. Depression is one of my main specialities as it affects so many people and has a way of creeping into someone's life and making it topsy turvy. When working with depression I use Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy and Narrative Therapy.

— Catharine Pritchard Hawks, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

Depression or anxiety can have a HUGE impact on your life. It may feel as if it is impossible to complete day to day tasks. It is hard to explain what you are feeling and the impact depression or anxiety is having on your life. It might feel as if you are drowning and you see no way to keep your head above water. If you are looking for therapy and counseling for depression or anxiety, contact me today.

— JADI FERGEN, Counselor in Colorado Springs, CO
 

Depression is chronic pain: grinding, hopeless agony that is hard to imagine if you haven't experienced it. It makes it difficult to look forward, to remember anything other than pain, and impossibly complex to fully enjoy even the most wondrous of events. It is perpetuated by the belief that the depressed person is exaggerating, 'making it up to get attention', or just needs to pull themselves up by their bootstraps. It is often the outcome of painful experiences that overwhelm the person's coping mechanisms, the lack of positive support in crucial periods of development, or just plain genetic legacy. Whatever the source, depression leaves a person feeling that they have no worth, that there is no hope, and that they don't deserve to get better. The truth is: you can feel better, you deserve to feel better, and you can learn how to create a life worth living. Therapy involves challenging old beliefs, and uncovering the person you have the potential to be.

— Katherine Chiba, Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR

It's okay to not be okay - really, it's okay! Depression can be predictable some of the time, and yet, other times it appears unexpectedly. It can sneak up on you, lay stagnant for a long time, or hit like a hurricane. Depression looks different on everyone - some have trouble getting out of bed in the morning, others refrain from social activity, and yet others wear a mask over their depression by being the life of the party while they're hurting inside. However you experience depression, I understand how taxing it can be to cope with the emotional hurt and manage the other symptoms that come with it. I understand that everyone copes in different ways, and some go-to coping skills might not be as effective for you. You are the expert of your life, and together we'll find what works best for you! We may look into reasons why you're feeling the way you do, or simply look for ways to help you feel better. There's always hope, even if it's difficult to see at the time, hope is there!

— Julia Tehovnik, Counselor in Chicago, IL
 

It’s normal to feel sad from time to time. Depression is a chronic state lasting 2 weeks or longer that some describe as sad but has also been describe as feeling “numb” or even anxious. When we try to avoid painful feelings long enough, we can often end up with a feeling of depression that may not feel tied to any one thing in particular. Therapy can help you explore the sources of your depression and find healing.

— Jennifer Newbloom, Counselor in Seattle, WA

Treating depression takes time and desication and I understand that both of those elements are needed to make good progress. I utilize CBT in changing thought patterns that can cause or prolong depression.

— Lissa Merkel, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA
 

Having depression can interfere in one's life in many different areas. It an affect work, relationships and self-esteem. Often when people are depressed they are not sure that they are experiencing depression but you do not necessarily need to be experiencing severe symptoms to need help. Any amount of distress warrants help. It can often the case that when someone is experiencing depression they are still functioning but are struggling in their functioning or not enjoying their life anymore. Through talk therapy, you can try to get a better sense of what is going on by gaining understanding into why you might be experiencing depression. Through talk therapy, I can also guide you in coming up with a plan that will work best for you as you recover from depression.

— Catherine Kiley, Counselor in New York, NY

Depression can be like tunnel vision-you see no way out, feel down and even helpless. You have lost interest in things that normally you enjoyed doingI and find you are isolating more and more. Friends and family try to understand and be helpful but the more you are pressured to do things you don’t feel up to, the worse you feel. Therapy can help you work through the emotional obstacles that have been keeping you stuck. Psychotherapy has been called “the talking cure” and it’s true that talking with a professional who will not only listen snd not judge, but will also help you gain insight and suggest coping strategies can be incredibly helpful.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ
 

Depression can bring a unique combination of feeling bad, and not being able to do the things that make you feel better. There's a "double-whammy" when you're down, and feel like you're "messing up" when you can't do the things that may make you feel better. Some people feel a combination of sadness and failure (at not being able to "think my way out of this.") Depression whispers in our ears "I'm never going away ... I'm with you forever ...." But depression is wrong - there are many ways to address depression, and I work with clients like you to discover the ways that work for you.

— Barton Shulman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Francisco, CA

I use many modalities depending on my client's needs to work through their depression. Mindfulness, cognitive behavioral therapy, energy based therapy, breathing techniques are a few examples that help people work through their depression.

— Linda Erwin-Gallagher, Marriage & Family Therapist in SERVING CA RESIDENDENTS, CA
 

I have over 10 years working with people with major depression with very good success helping them reach recovery using mindfulness based treatment.

— Jenna Rasmussen, Counselor in Portland, OR

The step-by-step approach we will take together: ​ In the beginning of our work together I will be assessing your overall functioning. We will likely discuss what life was like before your loss, and identify what areas of your life have been directly and indirectly impacted as a result. ​ The next step is to make a plan for treatment together. Grief and depression can often interfere with your ability to meet your basic needs (physiological and safety), which can have a negative ripple effect on your relationships with others, as well as on your self-confidence. We begin by creating a plan based on how severely your symptoms are impacting your daily life. We begin by addressing basic needs and building goals around meeting those needs. ​ We view CBT for grief and depression as having two overarching goals for symptom reduction and our work in therapy: Restore healthy functioning in thoughts, perceptions and beliefs Restore healthy functioning in ability and behavior ​ In trying to meet these goals, we may assign homework to attempt between sessions, and then act as an accountability resource for this homework. This homework will likely include using coping skills we have discussed in session together. We often provide you with a few options for homework assignments, and then empower you to choose the one that seems both doable and still somewhat challenging. In session together, we will discuss how the loss or depression has affected your thoughts and perceptions about yourself, the world and how can function in it. We will work to challenge thoughts and perceptions that may have been negatively skewed by your experience. Examples of these may be: ​ “The whole world is unsafe.” “Everyone is out to get me.” “I will never feel normal/like myself again.” “I’m not worthy of….” “I need this (unhealthy habit) to escape how I feel every day.” ​ As we go along, we will continue to acknowledge and celebrate your successes as well as re-evaluate what parts of treatment are helpful, and what parts of treatment need fine tuning to better meet your needs. Together we will get you back to living the life you deserve.

— Colin Boylan, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Berkeley, CA
 

While everyone experiences some form of depression during their life, I work with those people who are suffering from severe, intractable depression, whether it be situational or clinical. I believe that with insight and awareness into the “whys” of their depression, they are able to find new ways to cope and begin to live the life they have dreamt of living . I do believe that some forms of depression are clinical and often medication is a useful adjunct to the therapy process. However, choosing to use medication is a personal decision by the client and it is not until we have completed a full history and assessment of their symptoms that we may make the decision to go that route. I believe there is help and there is hope and fighting this terrible disease. And hope is the most important part of the therapy process.

— Debra Schnack, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR

I provide compassionate, mindfulness-based counseling to process what may be causing depression, help access resources in the self for more resiliency, and help you find more contentment in life.

— Stuart Malkin, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Depression can be like tunnel vision-you see no way out, feel down and even helpless. You have lost interest in things that normally you enjoyed doingI and find you are isolating more and more. Friends and family try to understand and be helpful but the more you are pressured to do things you don’t feel up to, the worse you feel. Therapy can help you work through the emotional obstacles that have been keeping you stuck. Psychotherapy has been called “the talking cure” and it’s true that talking with a professional who will not only listen snd not judge, but will also help you gain insight and suggest coping strategies can be incredibly helpful.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ

Rebecca has a lot of experience working with individual struggling with various depressive symptoms and/or disorders. Rebecca has been trained in a variety of evidence-based interventions that address anxiety, including, but not limited to, cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychodynamic therapy, and mindfulness. Sometimes individuals who struggle with depressive symptoms engage in nonsuicidal self-injurious behaviors and/or suicidal ideation, and Rebecca has a lot of experience working with clients who are experiencing these difficulties.

— Rebecca Neubauer, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Santa Monica, CA
 

Psychotherapy, especially Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) has been shown to be effective in helping people with depression feel better and return to their previous lives. Through therapy, you’ll begin to understand what contributes to your depression. You’ll learn specific strategies to understand why you think the things you do, and why it can be so hard to change those thoughts on your own. Through counseling, you can learn to think differently about yourself, others, and the world.

— Melissa Leedy, Counselor in Broken Arrow, OK

Many people describe Depression as "a dark cloud over my life that just wont go away." Depression is one of the most challenging, yet one of the most common psychiatric disorders. Different from popular belief, it is not prolonged sadness. Sadness is a normal and expected part of being alive and human, depression is not. One of the most prominent symptoms is called "Anhedonia" or the inability to experience pleasure. Things you once enjoyed just seem dull and bland, your motivation is zapped, and you find yourself wanting to isolate or be alone. Those who seek help for depression often report feeling "like a black cloud is always hovering over me" and are burdened by excessive guilt. Changes in appetite and sleep are often common too. In fact, difficulty falling asleep and/or waking up early in the morning without being able to fall back asleep are common early symptoms of a depressive episode. Excessive fatigue, irritability, feelings of emptiness, and difficulty concentrating are other common complaints. Good news is, it is easily treatable! I have helped many face their depression, learn new skills, and regain their old vitality. Don't wait until it takes over your life, the earlier you seek help, the better off you will be and the more likely you will be able to avoid depressive episodes in the future.

— Mitch Keil, Psychologist in Newport Beach, CA
 

Depression can sometimes feel like a thick cloud of sadness and hopelessness weighing us down. Stress from relationships, dating, work, school, family can feel like chains tying us down. And sometimes we are our own worst critic, telling ourselves we're not worthy or no good. I have extensive experience working with depression, suicidal thoughts, and suicidal crisis. Together, we can manage your safety and define concrete paths to steer through the dense fog.

— Michelle Chong, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Depression is one of the most common reasons a person seeks treatment. Its the Void. Its comorbid in my twin specialties: addiction recovery and trauma. I’ve worked with hundreds of people who sought reluef from the suffering of depression and learned that it’s usually symptomstic of something else. Hence my core change focus, get to the roots of it.

— Elizabeth Ostolozaga, Clinical Social Worker in Rapid City, SD
 

My approach is eclectic, allowing space for a broad exploration of depression that includes spiritual and existential concerns. Life's challenges provide an opportunity for deep transformation. Depression can be an entry to such learning.

— Loretta Staples, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in New Haven, CT
 

Depression can be like tunnel vision-you see no way out, feel down and even helpless. You have lost interest in things that normally you enjoyed doingI and find you are isolating more and more. Friends and family try to understand and be helpful but the more you are pressured to do things you don’t feel up to, the worse you feel. Therapy can help you work through the emotional obstacles that have been keeping you stuck. Psychotherapy has been called “the talking cure” and it’s true that talking with a professional who will not only listen snd not judge, but will also help you gain insight and suggest coping strategies can be incredibly helpful.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ

In children, adolescents, and adults; I take a very holistic approach that emphasizes mind-body wellness.

— Robin Knoblach, Clinical Psychologist in Herndon, VA

Depressive disorders and bipolar disorders, border personality disorder and related self-harm behaviors

— Junhong (June) Cao, Clinical Psychologist in New York, NY
 

I currently work with active duty military, their families, and retirees in the Tricare insurance program who are dealing with chronic depression and other comorbid conditions.

— Mark Holcomb, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Fair Oaks, CA
 

Depression can feel overwhelming and lonely. It’s hard to fulfill obligations of work, parenting, and other responsibilities when you're struggling with feelings of fatigue, sadness, hopelessness and even irritability. You don’t have to struggle alone. You deserve better and individual counseling can offer that to you. I can help you better understand how your depression got started and what is helping to maintain these feelings. Once we've uncovered what has contributed to these feelings, I can help you develop the skills to better manage your emotions by learning ways to minimize the frequency and intensity of these symptoms. Together, we will develop an individualized plan to help you achieve your goals so you can live more authentically and feel better.

— Kerri-Anne Brown, Licensed Professional Counselor in Orlando, FL

With Level 3 Certification in TEAM-CBT, I offer an effective program for the treatment of depression based on the work of David Burns, MD. You can learn more here https://www.juliemsimons.com/team-cbt/

— Julie Simons, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Lakewood Ranch, FL
 

I have worked with individuals with depression, including bipolar disorder, throughout my career. Research indicates that for mild depression, psychotherapy alone is usually effective and for moderate depression and a mixture of psychotherapy and medication is effective for most people. My criteria for referring for medication is how much the depression is impacting on your daily life, how long you have been depressed, and how much distress you have.

— Karin Wandrei, Clinical Social Worker in Rohnert Park, CA

Depression likes to sit in the background and wait for that incident and then it comes on full fury and sometimes it sneaks on up. The use of Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Guided meditation and hypnosis will help you to keep depression at bay. I can teach you these techniques so that you are empowered to work through your depression when it arises.

— Angela Collier, Licensed Professional Counselor in Waco, TX
 

Sometimes the reason why someone becomes depressed is not immediately clear to them. Whereas others will attribute their depression to particular life circumstances: loss of a job, loss of finances, loss of a loved one, physical limitations, illness, aging. Some people report they are depressed because they feel helpless or hopeless about changing some aspect of their life. Others report feeling blocked or stuck in guilt, fear, or shame. Whereas others feel their very existence has no purpose or meaning. Also, it is common in depression not to feel connected to others. These are very valid and real forms of suffering. Through 20+ years of research and clinical practice with thousands of patients, I know just how very serious depression can be. I utilize a tailor made set of proven therapy modalities because everyone is unique with their own history and personality, no two people experience depression in the same exact way.

— Dr. Shawna Freshwater, Clinical Psychologist in Miami Beach, FL

It’s normal for each of us to experience times when we aren’t feeling as good or are struggling with our mood. Depression is a little different. When we are depressed we aren’t always able to explain why we are feeling this way. Depression impacts how we think, how we feel, and how we behave. Depression is a common brain illness. The World Health Organization estimates that 1 in 5 women and 1 in 10 men will experience depression in their lifetime. Depression also does not discriminate. People can suffer from depression at any age and regardless of their relationship status, work stability, race, ethnicity, etc. If you find that your mood is interfering in your life, it might be a good time to reach out for help. Therapy is a useful tool in treating depression. In therapy, we will work together to identify patterns of behavior and thoughts that might actually be supporting your depression. Together we can work to break those patterns and help you to find new ways of managing your thoughts and feelings.

— Caroline Biber, Clinical Social Worker in Charlotte, NC
 

Down in the dumps. Let's help lift you up.

— Matthew Breuer, Counselor in San Francisco, CA

I am well-versed in cognitive-behavioral therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy, two common therapy techniques for depression.

— Bianca Jones, Psychologist in Houston, TX
 

Many of us seek the support of psychotherapy or counseling at some point in their lives. Some come for relief from debilitating anxiety or depression, while others come for assistance in creating and sustaining stable and nurturing bonds with others. Some come to understand reoccurring anger or conflicts with loved ones, or the lingering influences of childhood experiences hardships that still impact their lives. Others come crippled by fears of expressing themselves authentically or trusting others, desperate to liberate themselves from the constraints impeding their lives, but unsure if such freedom is even possible. Others seek the help of psychotherapy to develop new ways of responding to circumstances that have been habitually problematic, to develop more capacity for intimacy or to experience more joy, ease and contentment in their lives. Whatever reason you are seeking support, I'd like to help.

— Rawna Romero, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Alameda, CA

I believe that all people experience depression at some point in their life. However I work with people who experience situational, as well as clinical depression that inhibit them from enjoying even the smallest, simplest things in life. In the beginning, we look at all things in their life – their history, their family of origin, traumatic events, as well as current events that are affecting their ability to enjoy their present life. Depression can also be clinical, such that medication management may become a part of the treatment plan to help them begin to feel better and manage their life. Medication is a personal decision and it is not without in-depth exploration into the “whys” of the depression before a decision is made.

— Debra Schnack, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR

If you are suffering after an important loss, I am here to support you. The first thing to be aware of is that grief and depression often look similar, and frequently go hand in hand. Your experience of grief may manifest as a physical, social, or emotional reaction. You might be having strong feelings of anger, guilt, anxiety, or despair. We are here to help you make sense of your feelings, and find ways to grieve your loss meaningfully and patiently, while also supporting you in getting back to your normal self, and your life. The feelings of grief and loss are not limited to the experience of death. Grief from loss can occur from a breakup, a divorce, rehoming of a pet, or of a physical or mental ability, job, or home The experience of loss often involves a lot of change, and change can be uncomfortable and scary. One of our goals is to help you adapt to these changes and redefine what your life will look like going forward. Change can prompt feelings and reactions that you didn’t know you were capable of. We will provide a safe place for you to discuss these feelings and validate that there is no “wrong way” to grieve. We will also provide you with resources and practical tools to help you cope with the overall impact of the loss in your life and the uncomfortable feelings of depression, anxiety, anger etc. The step-by-step approach we will take together: ​ In the beginning of our work together I will be assessing your overall functioning. We will likely discuss what life was like before your loss, and identify what areas of your life have been directly and indirectly impacted as a result. ​ The next step is to make a plan for treatment together. Grief and depression can often interfere with your ability to meet your basic needs (physiological and safety), which can have a negative ripple effect on your relationships with others, as well as on your self-confidence. We begin by creating a plan based on how severely your symptoms are impacting your daily life. We begin by addressing basic needs and building goals around meeting those needs.

— Ayelet Krieger, Clinical Psychologist in Berkeley, CA
 

I have experience working with adolescent and adults clients who have experienced mild to severe depression. The clients I have worked with have experienced a range of symptoms including difficulty sleeping, sleeping too much, lacking motivation, isolating from their friends and family, and feeling hopeless in regards to their future. I also work with clients who have engaged in self-harming behaviors, experienced recurrent thoughts of dying, and clients who have attempted suicide.

— Torie Cueto, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA

Depression is often described to me like a heavy blanket has been laid over my clients lives. They struggle with painful emotions, but more often it's a feeling of emptiness, without energy or motivation. Unlike the antidepressant commercials with the rain clouds and sad cartoon characters, most of my clients continue functioning while feeling completely disconnected, rarely letting on to their suffering. I primarily rely on emotion-focused approaches in all of my therapy, but especially with depression. Together we begin exploring the emotional landscape underneath the emptiness and work on discovering how the emotional system is blocked so we can work on restoring it to healthy function.

— Darin Bergen, Psychologist in Portland, OR
 

We have all experienced either a depressed mood, or even full-scale clinical depression. While it can be painful to slog through a depressed period, I have a deep respect for the potentially important messages a depressed mood might be bringing to light. Is there something amiss in your life that is leaving you unsatisfied? Are you safe and healthy? Do you have meaningful work and purpose? Are you living according to your most treasured values? Do you have satisfying relationships? Together we can explore what it is you most want and need. I support my clients in whatever choices they make about medication, but before they embark on antidepressants, I encourage them to talk to me about what kind of safe and affordable relief amino acid supplementation my have to offer. I also encourage practical non-pharmaceutical practices that are proven to quickly lift mood and serotonin levels.

— Maysie Tift, MFT, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Rafael, CA
 

Depression is hard to talk about. There is a shame and stigma around it. People unfairly associate depression with weakness and think people should just "get over it." Depression is a very real, very painful health concern that requires treatment. I use Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to help you learn how to manage your depression and get your life back. Sometimes life is dark and it sucks and existing feels exhausting. It takes work, but with persistence you can feel better. For more information, check out my website at https://fireflywellnesscounseling.com/services/therapy-for-depression/

— Anne Rice, Licensed Professional Counselor in Decatur, GA
 

We will work together on creating a plan that will help you feel empowered, motivated, and happy.

— Paulishia Augillard, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX
 

I use a number of different modalities to treat anxiety, depression, and PTSD, including EMDR, self -compassion focused therapy, mindfulness, CBT and DBT skills training, breathwork, meditation and Reiki.

— Maggie Seaman, Clinical Social Worker in White Plains, NY

Depression can be a powerful force disrupting quality of life. It impacts the individual's thoughts, emotions, and physical health. It can be helpful to address depression from the "outside in" with specific planning and support to get reengaged with life "out there". Also it can be helpful to address depression from the "inside out" by learning new ways to related to challenging emotions and by gaining insight into the underpinnings of each person's unique emotional patterns. Compassionate, intentional, and skillful approaches to depression can transform a person's inner and outer life as a means to rise out of depression.

— Wes Harris, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Deep sadness. Can we stop pushing it away, even for a moment, and listen to what it is desperately trying to tell us? This is no easy task in our culture of 'Produce!' and 'Be happy at all costs!' Yet there is so much to be sad about personally, societally and planetarily. Pushing it away makes it dig in deeper. But by honoring it, we can find its meaning, our passion and our unique call to action.

— Grace Silvia, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR

I have worked extensively with serious depression and understand what treatment options there are, how to help clients begin to move out of the depression, when to seek medical consultation, how to deal with suicidal thoughts.

— Rowena Dodson, Marriage & Family Therapist in Mountain View, CA
 

Depression can be a reaction to external or internal circumstances, or both. We will find out what it is that is causing you to show symptoms of depression and then together find ways to address the things that are bringing you down. Sometimes depression is physical enough that medication support is warranted. Together we will understand your experience and find ways forward. Depression is usually treatable. You do not have to feel this way forever.

— Hugh Simmons, Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX

Find hope out of the dark tunnel of despair.

— Gerda Phillips, Counselor in Phoenix, AZ
 

The step-by-step approach we will take together: ​ In the beginning of our work together I will be assessing your overall functioning. We will likely discuss what life was like before your loss, and identify what areas of your life have been directly and indirectly impacted as a result. ​ The next step is to make a plan for treatment together. Grief and depression can often interfere with your ability to meet your basic needs (physiological and safety), which can have a negative ripple effect on your relationships with others, as well as on your self-confidence. We begin by creating a plan based on how severely your symptoms are impacting your daily life. We begin by addressing basic needs and building goals around meeting those needs. ​ We view CBT for grief and depression as having two overarching goals for symptom reduction and our work in therapy: Restore healthy functioning in thoughts, perceptions and beliefs Restore healthy functioning in ability and behavior ​ In trying to meet these goals, we may assign homework to attempt between sessions, and then act as an accountability resource for this homework. This homework will likely include using coping skills we have discussed in session together. We often provide you with a few options for homework assignments, and then empower you to choose the one that seems both doable and still somewhat challenging. In session together, we will discuss how the loss or depression has affected your thoughts and perceptions about yourself, the world and how can function in it. We will work to challenge thoughts and perceptions that may have been negatively skewed by your experience. Examples of these may be: ​ “The whole world is unsafe.” “Everyone is out to get me.” “I will never feel normal/like myself again.” “I’m not worthy of….” “I need this (unhealthy habit) to escape how I feel every day.” ​ As we go along, we will continue to acknowledge and celebrate your successes as well as re-evaluate what parts of treatment are helpful, and what parts of treatment need fine tuning to better meet your needs. Together we will get you back to living the life you deserve.

— Kim Strong, Clinical Social Worker in San Francisco, CA

Rebecca has a lot of experience working with individual struggling with various depressive symptoms and/or disorders. Rebecca has been trained in a variety of evidence-based interventions that address anxiety, including, but not limited to, cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychodynamic therapy, and mindfulness. Sometimes individuals who struggle with depressive symptoms engage in nonsuicidal self-injurious behaviors and/or suicidal ideation, and Rebecca has a lot of experience working with clients who are experiencing these difficulties.

— Rebecca Neubauer, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Santa Monica, CA
 

Depression can affect all areas of a person’s life. It can leave you feeling isolated, exhausted, immobilized, and hopeless. I want for you to know that you don't have to stay stuck.

— Sarah McIntyre, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX

Depression is one of the most common diagnoses in the mental health world. No matter who you are, you have most likely experienced depression first hand or have a family member that has dealt with feelings of depression. I have years of experience treating depression. I take pride in helping clients realize that life will go on after feelings of depression and that you have you can pull yourself from the deep crevices of depression.

— LaShanna Stephens, Counselor in Macon, GA

To be depressed is to be scared that you are too bad or inadequate. You fear that your badness is going to corrupt other things and people in life, or that your inadequacy is going to keep you lonely the rest of your life. Both are terribly painful and working with a skilled psychotherapist can help. Change can come in the first 5 minutes of the session, but more realistically, it happens in the midst of a connected, honest, and supportive therapy relationship. You do not need to be living in so much guilt and shame. Give me a call today to talk about how therapy can help or to schedule your first session.

— Reid Kessler, Psychologist in Encinitas, CA
 

The step-by-step approach we will take together: ​ In the beginning of our work together I will be assessing your overall functioning. We will likely discuss what life was like before your loss, and identify what areas of your life have been directly and indirectly impacted as a result. ​ The next step is to make a plan for treatment together. Grief and depression can often interfere with your ability to meet your basic needs (physiological and safety), which can have a negative ripple effect on your relationships with others, as well as on your self-confidence. We begin by creating a plan based on how severely your symptoms are impacting your daily life. We begin by addressing basic needs and building goals around meeting those needs. ​ We view CBT for grief and depression as having two overarching goals for symptom reduction and our work in therapy: Restore healthy functioning in thoughts, perceptions and beliefs Restore healthy functioning in ability and behavior ​ In trying to meet these goals, we may assign homework to attempt between sessions, and then act as an accountability resource for this homework. This homework will likely include using coping skills we have discussed in session together. We often provide you with a few options for homework assignments, and then empower you to choose the one that seems both doable and still somewhat challenging. In session together, we will discuss how the loss or depression has affected your thoughts and perceptions about yourself, the world and how can function in it. We will work to challenge thoughts and perceptions that may have been negatively skewed by your experience. Examples of these may be: ​ “The whole world is unsafe.” “Everyone is out to get me.” “I will never feel normal/like myself again.” “I’m not worthy of….” “I need this (unhealthy habit) to escape how I feel every day.” ​ As we go along, we will continue to acknowledge and celebrate your successes as well as re-evaluate what parts of treatment are helpful, and what parts of treatment need fine tuning to better meet your needs. Together we will get you back to living the life you deserve.

— Elyse Gong, Clinical Social Worker in Berkeley, CA

Feeling low-energy, numb, spaced out, or irritable for more than 2 weeks at a time can be hints that you might be experiencing depression. You can't "will" your way out of depression, but it is very treatable.

— Jennifer Schermerhorn, Counselor in Black Mountain, NC
 

Depression is our mind's way of telling us that something is not right in our lives. As an experienced clinician who has worked with thousands of people with depression, I understand that depression can have several different causes and treatments. I offer you a supportive environment where you can be honest about your suffering while experimenting with the hope for change.

— Lilyan Moore, Counselor in Portland, OR

Depressed mood is problematic for many people to varying degrees, from mid to severe and unrelenting, and it can be experienced differently by different people. My strongest area of expertise is in treating depression and co-occurring problems including anxiety and alcohol misuse. I have conducted original research on ruminating, expressive writing, and experiential avoidance associated with depressed moods.

— Carrie Dodrill, Psychologist in Houston, TX
 

When we're unappreciated, it's easy for the negative voices to take over. I want to help you quiet those voices so you can get out of bed each morning ready for the day. You'll learn techniques to silence those voices before bed so you can fall asleep without thinking you're a bad mother.

— Dr. Kevin Hyde, Psychologist in Palm Harbor, FL

I work with clients who are looking to move through times of sadness and feelings of depression. Somatic psychotherapy can help by uncovering the roots of how your depression started and how depression affects your body. You see, depression is not only a feeling state. It also gets expressed in your body, which includes your thought patterns and the specific habits you have when you are feeling down. With the support of a somatic psychotherapist, you can begin to explore blocks to your own emotional healing and wellness. Through this type of exploration and self-study in mindfulness, you can begin to tap into feelings of wholeness and pleasure. With this new awareness and understanding of both your mind and body you will have more choice and options the next time you are feeling down.

— Melody Wright, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA
 

I have extensive experience working with both chronic low level (dysthymic) depression and major depression. I enjoy helping people rewire their brains to lessen and relieve depression and increase their ability to participate in / enjoy life.

— Jill Pressley, Counselor in Austin, TX