Depression

Depression is a mental health disorder that affects mood, including how you feel, think, and behave. Everyone feels sad sometimes, but when it starts to affect your ability to perform daily tasks and your ability to enjoy things that typically bring you happiness, you may be suffering from depression. The symptoms of depression vary from person to person, but often include feeling miserable without a clear reason why, anxiety, agitation, insomnia or sleeping too much, hopelessness, changes in eating, and/or foggy thinking. Depression may also cause recurrent thoughts of death or suicide (or even a wish that it would all 'stop' in an abstract sense). If you think you might be suffering from depression, a qualified mental health therapist can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s depression experts today!

Meet the specialists

I know what it’s like to struggle with depression as well. Having suffered from depression throughout my life, I know first-hand how it can shake us to our core, leaving us feeling hopeless, helpless and powerless. However, the good news is, you don’t have to stay stuck in depression. There is light at the end of the tunnel. The only thing is, you need to seek out professional help now in order to overcome this total state of negativity that you’re feeling stuck in. Help is available.

— Noorayne Chevalier, Therapist in Detroit, MI
 

The step-by-step approach we will take together: ​ In the beginning of our work together I will be assessing your overall functioning. We will likely discuss what life was like before your loss, and identify what areas of your life have been directly and indirectly impacted as a result. ​ The next step is to make a plan for treatment together. Grief and depression can often interfere with your ability to meet your basic needs (physiological and safety), which can have a negative ripple effect on your relationships with others, as well as on your self-confidence. We begin by creating a plan based on how severely your symptoms are impacting your daily life. We begin by addressing basic needs and building goals around meeting those needs. ​ We view CBT for grief and depression as having two overarching goals for symptom reduction and our work in therapy: Restore healthy functioning in thoughts, perceptions and beliefs Restore healthy functioning in ability and behavior ​ In trying to meet these goals, we may assign homework to attempt between sessions, and then act as an accountability resource for this homework. This homework will likely include using coping skills we have discussed in session together. We often provide you with a few options for homework assignments, and then empower you to choose the one that seems both doable and still somewhat challenging. In session together, we will discuss how the loss or depression has affected your thoughts and perceptions about yourself, the world and how can function in it. We will work to challenge thoughts and perceptions that may have been negatively skewed by your experience. Examples of these may be: ​ “The whole world is unsafe.” “Everyone is out to get me.” “I will never feel normal/like myself again.” “I’m not worthy of….” “I need this (unhealthy habit) to escape how I feel every day.” ​ As we go along, we will continue to acknowledge and celebrate your successes as well as re-evaluate what parts of treatment are helpful, and what parts of treatment need fine tuning to better meet your needs. Together we will get you back to living the life you deserve.

— Colin Boylan, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Berkeley, CA

Depression likes to sit in the background and wait for that incident and then it comes on full fury and sometimes it sneaks on up. The use of Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Guided meditation and hypnosis will help you to keep depression at bay. I can teach you these techniques so that you are empowered to work through your depression when it arises.

— Angela Collier, Licensed Professional Counselor in Waco, TX
 

Psychotherapy, especially Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) has been shown to be effective in helping people with depression feel better and return to their previous lives. Through therapy, you’ll begin to understand what contributes to your depression. You’ll learn specific strategies to understand why you think the things you do, and why it can be so hard to change those thoughts on your own. Through counseling, you can learn to think differently about yourself, others, and the world.

— Melissa Leedy, Counselor in Broken Arrow, OK

Will work with clients aged 10 and up that struggle with depression

— Michael Gacnik, Counselor in Groveport, OH
 

I’ve counseled many clients with depression and help give practical tools to alleviate their suffering. Your can start feeling better today.

— Kelli Miller, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Encino, CA

I have worked with individuals with depression, including bipolar disorder, throughout my career. Research indicates that for mild depression, psychotherapy alone is usually effective and for moderate depression and a mixture of psychotherapy and medication is effective for most people. My criteria for referring for medication is how much the depression is impacting on your daily life, how long you have been depressed, and how much distress you have.

— Karin Wandrei, Clinical Social Worker in Rohnert Park, CA
 

Depression can be like tunnel vision-you see no way out, feel down and even helpless. You have lost interest in things that normally you enjoyed doingI and find you are isolating more and more. Friends and family try to understand and be helpful but the more you are pressured to do things you don’t feel up to, the worse you feel. Therapy can help you work through the emotional obstacles that have been keeping you stuck. Psychotherapy has been called “the talking cure” and it’s true that talking with a professional who will not only listen snd not judge, but will also help you gain insight and suggest coping strategies can be incredibly helpful.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ

In music therapy, emotion is translated in melody, Listening and creating music within a therapeutic context allows individuals to express themselves in nonverbal ways. The interplay of melody, harmony, and rhythm can stimulate the senses and promote calmness. *Positive changes in mood and emotional states *Support healthy feelings and thoughts *Interact socially with others *Increased motivation *Successful and safe emotional release

— Megan Dozler, Creative Art Therapist in Napa, CA
 

The step-by-step approach we will take together: ​ In the beginning of our work together I will be assessing your overall functioning. We will likely discuss what life was like before your loss, and identify what areas of your life have been directly and indirectly impacted as a result. ​ The next step is to make a plan for treatment together. Grief and depression can often interfere with your ability to meet your basic needs (physiological and safety), which can have a negative ripple effect on your relationships with others, as well as on your self-confidence. We begin by creating a plan based on how severely your symptoms are impacting your daily life. We begin by addressing basic needs and building goals around meeting those needs. ​ We view CBT for grief and depression as having two overarching goals for symptom reduction and our work in therapy: Restore healthy functioning in thoughts, perceptions and beliefs Restore healthy functioning in ability and behavior ​ In trying to meet these goals, we may assign homework to attempt between sessions, and then act as an accountability resource for this homework. This homework will likely include using coping skills we have discussed in session together. We often provide you with a few options for homework assignments, and then empower you to choose the one that seems both doable and still somewhat challenging. In session together, we will discuss how the loss or depression has affected your thoughts and perceptions about yourself, the world and how can function in it. We will work to challenge thoughts and perceptions that may have been negatively skewed by your experience. Examples of these may be: ​ “The whole world is unsafe.” “Everyone is out to get me.” “I will never feel normal/like myself again.” “I’m not worthy of….” “I need this (unhealthy habit) to escape how I feel every day.” ​ As we go along, we will continue to acknowledge and celebrate your successes as well as re-evaluate what parts of treatment are helpful, and what parts of treatment need fine tuning to better meet your needs. Together we will get you back to living the life you deserve.

— Kathryn Richards, Clinical Social Worker in Berkeley, CA

I frequently use a combination of interpersonal therapy, CBT, guided imagery, narrative therapy and build up natural supports to address depressive symptoms. The approach is always modified dependent on the individual's needs and severity of symptoms.

— Felicity Colangelo, Clinical Social Worker in Portland, ME
 

Depression is our mind's way of telling us that something is not right in our lives. As an experienced clinician who has worked with thousands of people with depression, I understand that depression can have several different causes and treatments. I offer you a supportive environment where you can be honest about your suffering while experimenting with the hope for change.

— Lilyan Moore, Counselor in Portland, OR

I use a number of different modalities to treat anxiety, depression, and PTSD, including EMDR, self -compassion focused therapy, mindfulness, CBT and DBT skills training, breathwork, meditation and Reiki.

— Maggie Seaman, Clinical Social Worker in White Plains, NY
 

In music therapy, emotion is translated into melody. Listening and creating music within a therapeutic context allows individuals to express themselves in nonverbal ways. The interplay of melody, harmony, and rhythm can stimulate the senses and promote calmness. *Positive changes in mood and emotional states *Support healthy feelings and thoughts *Interact socially with others *Increased motivation *Successful and safe emotional release

— Megan Dozler, Creative Art Therapist in Napa, CA

Depression is also a major problem for the people who come to therapy. Sometimes their depression is masked, and they don't realize they are depressed. If they are feeling angry or anxious, they may be depressed, and therapy helps to sort out their feelings. Many issues in life can bring on or exacerbate depression, including dysfunctional relationships, divorce, death or other losses, crises, or identity confusion. Throughout my career, I've been trained in various aspects of depressi

— Patricia Field, Clinical Psychologist in Los Angeles, CA

We will examine the symptoms related to depression to determine the source and uncover the solution that works for you.

— Lawanna Brown, Counselor in Greensboro, NC
 

You don't feel right. It may be hard for people to understand what's going on with you. Maybe your life looks fine on the outside, but for some reason you don't feel right on the inside. You feel fatigued, irritable and you've lost interest in the things that once brought you joy. You might be dealing with depression, which is more common than you think. Many people are going through what you're going through and have found relief through working with a therapist. You're on the right track.

— Natalie Moore, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA
 

There are moments in life when emotions become overwhelming and we may need help to get things back on track. I will be glad to assist you in your search for answers. Depressive symptoms can be overwhelming and lead you to a very dark place. I like to use a combination of techniques, such as exploring your past and early relationships, and also cognitive behavioral therapy to modify negative thoughts that can be harmful.

— Mariana Carabantes, Clinical Psychologist in Coral Gables, FL

Depression is symptom within our culture and society. It comes from either genetic factors or situational issues. Sometimes, we just need that extra help to get pulled out of an emotional slump we don't quite understand. Let's look at your depression together so you don't feel alone in trying to climb out. Sometimes one positive person can change the trajectory of someones future.

— Laura Smith, Counselor in Loveland, CO
 

Depression goes deeper than feeling sad. It affects you not just emotionally but also physically, and can be lonely, isolating, and eat away at self-esteem. The good news is you are not alone and depression is treatable. Often, there are various underlying factors that can we can explore together and address each individually.

— Courtney Wade, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Columbus, OH

You can’t change your life until you start taking steps forward. Depression and sadness can overtake anyone at anytime. Situations happen that are out of our control and it leaves us feeling hopeless and helpless. You’ve probably tried many things to help yourself start to feel better, but none of them have worked…At least not for long. We can help. We will work with you to develop the tools necessary to improve your emotional state and begin to find the true happiness that you deserve.

— Heather Landeros, Licensed Professional Counselor in Fort Worth, TX

Depression can be a serious, debilitating medical condition that diminishes one's ability to experience life in a balanced and manageable way. I was diagnosed with clinical depression in the early stages of my recovery process and with the help of proper medication, lifestyle changes, and self-care I live a life that has meaning and purpose for me. No one has to walk alone through recovery and change. Let me walk with you as you discover who you are meant to be.

— donald "keith" montgomery, Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX
 

I have dealt with my own depression and shame. Through my own work, I have helped these parts heal. I bring that personal experience, as well as professional knowledge and skills, to help others heal and come back into emotional balance.

— Beth Levine, Clinical Social Worker in Rockville, MD

Depression is one of the most common reasons a person seeks treatment. Its the Void. Its comorbid in my twin specialties: addiction recovery and trauma. I’ve worked with hundreds of people who sought reluef from the suffering of depression and learned that it’s usually symptomstic of something else. Hence my core change focus, get to the roots of it.

— Elizabeth Ostolozaga, Clinical Social Worker in Rapid City, SD

The step-by-step approach we will take together: ​ In the beginning of our work together I will be assessing your overall functioning. We will likely discuss what life was like before your loss, and identify what areas of your life have been directly and indirectly impacted as a result. ​ The next step is to make a plan for treatment together. Grief and depression can often interfere with your ability to meet your basic needs (physiological and safety), which can have a negative ripple effect on your relationships with others, as well as on your self-confidence. We begin by creating a plan based on how severely your symptoms are impacting your daily life. We begin by addressing basic needs and building goals around meeting those needs. ​ We view CBT for grief and depression as having two overarching goals for symptom reduction and our work in therapy: Restore healthy functioning in thoughts, perceptions and beliefs Restore healthy functioning in ability and behavior ​ In trying to meet these goals, we may assign homework to attempt between sessions, and then act as an accountability resource for this homework. This homework will likely include using coping skills we have discussed in session together. We often provide you with a few options for homework assignments, and then empower you to choose the one that seems both doable and still somewhat challenging. In session together, we will discuss how the loss or depression has affected your thoughts and perceptions about yourself, the world and how can function in it. We will work to challenge thoughts and perceptions that may have been negatively skewed by your experience. Examples of these may be: ​ “The whole world is unsafe.” “Everyone is out to get me.” “I will never feel normal/like myself again.” “I’m not worthy of….” “I need this (unhealthy habit) to escape how I feel every day.” ​ As we go along, we will continue to acknowledge and celebrate your successes as well as re-evaluate what parts of treatment are helpful, and what parts of treatment need fine tuning to better meet your needs. Together we will get you back to living the life you deserve.

— Kim Strong, Clinical Social Worker in San Francisco, CA

Are you tired of faking it? Let me help you take off the mask and begin really healing that depression. I know you would change if you just knew how. I understand that you can’t just “snap out of it”. Some days it feels like you’re drowning in your own darkness. It’s ok to ask for help. We’ll work together to find the right tools that work for you. Reach out!

— Tammy Cover, Counselor in Magnolia, TX

When faced with depression, clients will learn how to recognize and manage their unique depressive symptoms. Clients will learn to identify and challenge thoughts triggering their depression and learn how to be proactive in battling the depression. The approach is always gentle and supportive, allowing clients to feel safe and secure while going through this process.

— Mindful Counseling PLLC, Counselor in Denton, TX
 

Depression, fear, and anxiety are some of the most common and uncomfortable emotions that a woman can experience in her life. Through counseling, I am able to help you gain perspective and joy in your life.

— Tenisha Johnson, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Statewide Telehealth, OH

With Level 3 Certification in TEAM-CBT, I offer an effective program for the treatment of depression based on the work of David Burns, MD. You can learn more here https://www.juliemsimons.com/team-cbt/

— Julie Simons, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Lakewood Ranch, FL

When we have a hot fire of passion within us but are not allowed to express it in the outer world, our fire begins to implode in our bodies and becomes self-aggression attacking ourselves from the inside. Our feeling of self-attack is our feeling of depression. Our cultural assumptions are a cause of the repression of our fire. Women are supposed to behave like women and men are expected to act like men, and we are forced to lose our connection to our essence shining brightly deep within us.

— Hideko Ota, Counselor in Oakland, CA
 

I have worked with individuals that suffer from depression for the past 8 years and counting. I enjoy helping those that have symptoms of depression to find healthy coping skills for those symptoms.

— Tiffany Price, Counselor in MIDWEST CITY, OK

Do you actively search and question life’s meaning? Does it feel like you are so far behind and you don’t even know where to begin? Therapy can help people overcome feelings of dread and combat experiences in life that contribute to your overall sadness. When we begin to recognize all that life has to offer, we begin to value the part of being lost as part of the process of living.

— Victoria Wantuck, Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

It’s normal for each of us to experience times when we aren’t feeling as good or are struggling with our mood. Depression is a little different. When we are depressed we aren’t always able to explain why we are feeling this way. Depression impacts how we think, how we feel, and how we behave. Depression is a common brain illness. The World Health Organization estimates that 1 in 5 women and 1 in 10 men will experience depression in their lifetime. Depression also does not discriminate. People can suffer from depression at any age and regardless of their relationship status, work stability, race, ethnicity, etc. If you find that your mood is interfering in your life, it might be a good time to reach out for help. Therapy is a useful tool in treating depression. In therapy, we will work together to identify patterns of behavior and thoughts that might actually be supporting your depression. Together we can work to break those patterns and help you to find new ways of managing your thoughts and feelings.

— Caroline Biber, Clinical Social Worker in Charlotte, NC

I have been working with children and adults battling depression for over 10 years now. My specialty is dealing with you own thoughts on how to balance life with depression.

— Ledora Yerks-Birdlow, Licensed Professional Counselor in Harvey, LA
 

Depression is often described to me like a heavy blanket has been laid over my clients lives. They struggle with painful emotions, but more often it's a feeling of emptiness, without energy or motivation. Unlike the antidepressant commercials with the rain clouds and sad cartoon characters, most of my clients continue functioning while feeling completely disconnected, rarely letting on to their suffering. I primarily rely on emotion-focused approaches in all of my therapy, but especially with depression. Together we begin exploring the emotional landscape underneath the emptiness and work on discovering how the emotional system is blocked so we can work on restoring it to healthy function.

— Darin Bergen, Psychologist in Portland, OR
 

Sometimes the reason why someone becomes depressed is not immediately clear to them. Whereas others will attribute their depression to particular life circumstances: loss of a job, loss of finances, loss of a loved one, physical limitations, illness, aging. Some people report they are depressed because they feel helpless or hopeless about changing some aspect of their life. Others report feeling blocked or stuck in guilt, fear, or shame. Whereas others feel their very existence has no purpose or meaning. Also, it is common in depression not to feel connected to others. These are very valid and real forms of suffering. Through 20+ years of research and clinical practice with thousands of patients, I know just how very serious depression can be. I utilize a tailor made set of proven therapy modalities because everyone is unique with their own history and personality, no two people experience depression in the same exact way.

— Dr. Shawna Freshwater, Clinical Psychologist in Miami Beach, FL

I encourage saying positive affirmations daily, writing letters to their younger selves, journaling, discussing hope and dreams. I also help with changing negative cognitions into positive cognitions, again by giving homework and discussing at the next session.

— Teresa Meadows, Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY
 

My education, experience working with clients, as well as training in CBT, DBT, and ACT skills have helped me make a difference in the lives of my clients with depression.

— Doe Daughtrey, Social Worker in Gilbert, AZ

Feeling overwhelmed, sad and like you are carrying a heavy burden throughout your life experience is exhausting. Thinking others believe you 'have it all together' but knowing that you don't. Criticizing yourself and just not being able to connect any more with your self-belief over time obliterates your self-esteem. Let me help you learn the tips and tools necessary to build your self-belief, silence the critical voice and learn how to thrive again.

— Sitka Stueve, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Overland Park, KS
 

Some times it feels like there is no point. Some days it gets to where you can hardly get out of bed. I get it. I've been there. Let's get you back to enjoying your life. I promise, it's possible!

— John Kuykendall, Counselor in Kansas City, MO

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is an approach to psychotherapy that was originally created as a relapse-prevention treatment for depression. Mindfulness and mindfulness meditation focus on become aware of all incoming thoughts and feelings and accepting them, but not attaching or reacting to them.

— Deborah Blum, Counselor in North Miami Beach, FL
 

With an eclectic, integrative and holistic approach I have helped many resolve their depression. It's not just in our head. With my health coaching certifications, we also address inflammation and the role that diet, sleep and lifestyle play on our mood.

— Lili Wagner, Psychologist in Newhall, CA

Believe it or not in my work with individuals battling depression, there are many other issues that are interrelated (i.e. relationships difficulties, anxiety, medical issues, grief/loss). Helping understand how depression is related to other areas of your life/functioning is a start to your healing process!

— Cherice Poole, Clinical Social Worker in Roswell, GA
 

My clients appreciate my solution-focused approach & ability to tailor our sessions to their needs & personality.

— Ronda Wegman, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX

Depression is a mood disorder that can be mild, moderate or severe. The appropriate approach depends on the individual and their resources. It is a mood disorder that includes changes in sleep, appetite, energy level, concentration, daily behavior, or self-esteem. Depression can also be associated with thoughts of suicide. Even a mild depression is serious because left untreated, it has the potential to become devastating. My approach combines cognitive behavioral techniques and mindfulness.

— Tony Filanowski, Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY
 

Depression is a multifaceted issue that involves the mind/body connection. There are varying degrees depression is experienced by those suffering. I work with this in tailoring a unique treatment plan for every person. I take a relational holistic-person centered approach, and collaborate with clients to discover what resonates with them. I have learned varying ways to treat depression. It takes courage to ask for help, it isn't always easy, there is hope; I have witnessed successful outcomes.

— Bonnie Fleckenstein, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Austin, TX

Depression is also a major problem for the people who come to therapy. Sometimes their depression is masked, and they don't realize they are depressed. If they are feeling angry or anxious, they may be depressed, and therapy helps to sort out their feelings. Many issues in life can bring on or exacerbate depression, including dysfunctional relationships, divorce, death or other losses, crises, or identity confusion. Throughout my career, I've been trained in various aspects of depressi

— Patricia Field, Clinical Psychologist in Los Angeles, CA

Depression is often a suppression of lots of other emotions, so I often help people label those feelings, explore them and express them in various ways. Battling depression is often a balance of honoring ourselves and gently challenging ourselves when we are ready. This is also an area where I have a lot of personal experience.

— Leah Constantz, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Somerville, MA
 

Depression can be like tunnel vision-you see no way out, feel down and even helpless. You have lost interest in things that normally you enjoyed doingI and find you are isolating more and more. Friends and family try to understand and be helpful but the more you are pressured to do things you don’t feel up to, the worse you feel. Therapy can help you work through the emotional obstacles that have been keeping you stuck. Psychotherapy has been called “the talking cure” and it’s true that talking with a professional who will not only listen snd not judge, but will also help you gain insight and suggest coping strategies can be incredibly helpful.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ

Many of my clients suffer from depression that is often the result of feeling stunted or stuck in their career, relational or personal growth and happiness. I have treated a diverse range of adults and adolescents suffering from depression on varying levels. I understand the importance of properly diagnosing and treating depression when necessary with psychotropics medications, but I also educate clients on mind-body approaches that may naturally ease lighter levels of depression.

— Christy Merriner, Therapist in West Hollywood, CA
 

I have extensive experience working with depressive disorders, including Major Depression, Persistent Depressive Disorder, and depression as it presents in Bipolar and Schizoaffective disorders. Many of us in New England also find ourselves struggling with mild to moderate depression related to seasonal changes. I work with my clients to identify effective skills for managing symptoms of depression as well as lifestyle changes to encourage improved mood on a day to day basis.

— Laura Knudsen, Counselor in Newton, MA

While you may feel isolated and depressed at this time, it is important to know that you are not alone—I will walk this journey with you. Depression counseling gives us the space to begin to peel back the layers of some of the issues that reinforce your depression at a pace that works for you. As our work together evolves, you will develop more self awareness, identify cognitive and behavioral changes you want to make, and then we will put those changes into action together.

— Brad Fittes, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Mason, OH
 

Deep sadness. Can we stop pushing it away, even for a moment, and listen to what it is desperately trying to tell us? This is no easy task in our culture of 'Produce!' and 'Be happy at all costs!' Yet there is so much to be sad about personally, societally and planetarily. Pushing it away makes it dig in deeper. But by honoring it, we can find its meaning, our passion and our unique call to action.

— Grace Silvia, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR

Major depression is one of the most common mental disorders in the United States. For some individuals, major depression can result in severe impairments that interfere with or limit one’s ability to carry out major life activities. Research suggests that depression is caused by a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors. I have specific knowledge and experience in working with those with depression.

— Brittany Male, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in North Aurora, IL
 

We have all experienced either a depressed mood, or even full-scale clinical depression. While it can be painful to slog through a depressed period, I have a deep respect for the potentially important messages a depressed mood might be bringing to light. Is there something amiss in your life that is leaving you unsatisfied? Are you safe and healthy? Do you have meaningful work and purpose? Are you living according to your most treasured values? Do you have satisfying relationships? Together we can explore what it is you most want and need. I support my clients in whatever choices they make about medication, but before they embark on antidepressants, I encourage them to talk to me about what kind of safe and affordable relief amino acid supplementation my have to offer. I also encourage practical non-pharmaceutical practices that are proven to quickly lift mood and serotonin levels.

— Maysie Tift, MFT, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Rafael, CA

Depression can affect all areas of a person’s life. It can leave you feeling isolated, exhausted, immobilized, and hopeless. I want for you to know that you don't have to stay stuck.

— Sarah McIntyre, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX
 

Depression can hit anyone, at any age. Depression is more than just being down-in-the-dumps or moody. I understand your depression is specific to you. You may feel pain in your body. You may have a change in appetite. Whatever your particular depression struggle, I want to help you feel better.

— Shiloh Werkmeister, Counselor in Troy, MO

I work with depressed men to identify the root issues behind their depression, and help them not only cope, but work through their depression so it can be transformed and worked through.

— Jason Fierstein, Counselor for Men, Counselor in Phoenix, AZ

I use cognitive therapy and behavioral activation to help clients consider how habitual thought and behavior patterns may be contributing to their distress. I also teach mindfulness techniques to help my clients realize that there are tools at their disposal, every moment, that can help them see from new perspectives.

— Eric Eichler, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Denver, CO

Depression is also a major problem for the people who come to therapy. Sometimes their depression is masked, and they don't realize they are depressed. If they are feeling angry or anxious, they may be depressed, and therapy helps to sort out their feelings. Many issues in life can bring on or exacerbate depression, including dysfunctional relationships, divorce, death or other losses, crises, or identity confusion. Throughout my career, I've been trained in various aspects of depressi

— Patricia Field, Clinical Psychologist in Los Angeles, CA

In children, adolescents, and adults; I take a very holistic approach that emphasizes mind-body wellness.

— Robin Knoblach, Clinical Psychologist in Herndon, VA

Depression is so misunderstood in our culture. The isolation of it is exasperated by the rampant misunderstanding about what it is and what it means. I get that you are doing the best you can and when you can do more you will. Come and sit with me and we will take this journey together. You don't have to be alone.

— Angela Albert, Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

I believe that all people experience depression at some point in their life. However I work with people who experience situational, as well as clinical depression that inhibit them from enjoying even the smallest, simplest things in life. In the beginning, we look at all things in their life – their history, their family of origin, traumatic events, as well as current events that are affecting their ability to enjoy their present life. Depression can also be clinical, such that medication management may become a part of the treatment plan to help them begin to feel better and manage their life. Medication is a personal decision and it is not without in-depth exploration into the “whys” of the depression before a decision is made.

— Debra Schnack, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR

Depression can be like tunnel vision-you see no way out, feel down and even helpless. You have lost interest in things that normally you enjoyed doingI and find you are isolating more and more. Friends and family try to understand and be helpful but the more you are pressured to do things you don’t feel up to, the worse you feel. Therapy can help you work through the emotional obstacles that have been keeping you stuck. Psychotherapy has been called “the talking cure” and it’s true that talking with a professional who will not only listen snd not judge, but will also help you gain insight and suggest coping strategies can be incredibly helpful.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ

Depression is also a major problem for the people who come to therapy. Sometimes their depression is masked, and they don't realize they are depressed. If they are feeling angry or anxious, they may be depressed, and therapy helps to sort out their feelings. Many issues in life can bring on or exacerbate depression, including dysfunctional relationships, divorce, death or other losses, crises, or identity confusion. Throughout my career, I've been trained in various aspects of depressi

— Patricia Field, Clinical Psychologist in Los Angeles, CA
 

I assist you in challenging negative beliefs you may have about yourself, so that you can feel confident and proud. We also discuss what to do with the thoughts, feelings, and memories you experience so that they don’t take control of you. And I also assist you in resolving how your emotions may have impacted your relationships with friends, family, and significant others so that you can have healthy, fulfilling, and long-lasting relationships.

— Robyn Tamanaha, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Irvine, CA

There are many aspects to clinical depression and working on several underlying factors including history of trauma, family of origin, self-esteem, coping and other related issues can be helpful in treatment planning. Depression at it's truest form is debilitating for many but it is treatable.

— Lisa Lovelace, Clinical Psychologist in , MN

Deep sadness and depression are normal responses to events within life's path. While depression can be debilitating at times, it is my hope to sit with you in your pain and source of sadness. There are so many difficult things that can pile up on one another, making it complicated to maintain relationships, wellness, work, and other things you might value. I hope to listen to you and help you develop insight and self-awareness in your process.

— Kathleen Driscoll, Counselor in Greensboro, NC
 

It may be hard for people to understand what's going on with you. Maybe your life looks fine on the outside, but for some reason you don't feel right on the inside. You feel fatigued, irritable and you've lost interest in the things that once brought you joy. You might be dealing with depression, which is more common than you think. Many people are going through what you're going through and have found relief through working with a therapist. You're on the right track.

— Natalie Moore, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA

Many of us seek the support of psychotherapy or counseling at some point in their lives. Some come for relief from debilitating anxiety or depression, while others come for assistance in creating and sustaining stable and nurturing bonds with others. Some come to understand reoccurring anger or conflicts with loved ones, or the lingering influences of childhood experiences hardships that still impact their lives. Others come crippled by fears of expressing themselves authentically or trusting others, desperate to liberate themselves from the constraints impeding their lives, but unsure if such freedom is even possible. Others seek the help of psychotherapy to develop new ways of responding to circumstances that have been habitually problematic, to develop more capacity for intimacy or to experience more joy, ease and contentment in their lives. Whatever reason you are seeking support, I'd like to help.

— Rawna Romero, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Alameda, CA
 

Life can be complex, and when dealing with depression you may find yourself among severe emotional pain with no light at the end of the tunnel. The suffering you are experiencing is very real. I can help you work through the depressive feelings in order to find joy in life.

— Mary Nashed, Counselor in Chapel Hill, NC

I have worked with clients that are experiencing depression and anxiety since 1997 when I started being a counselor, then I focus on PPD and anxiety on 2005 and continue focusing in this area on my private practice. I have gotten extensive training thorugh all this years as a clinician.

— Ana Romero, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in MIRAMAR, FL, FL
 

The step-by-step approach we will take together: ​ In the beginning of our work together I will be assessing your overall functioning. We will likely discuss what life was like before your loss, and identify what areas of your life have been directly and indirectly impacted as a result. ​ The next step is to make a plan for treatment together. Grief and depression can often interfere with your ability to meet your basic needs (physiological and safety), which can have a negative ripple effect on your relationships with others, as well as on your self-confidence. We begin by creating a plan based on how severely your symptoms are impacting your daily life. We begin by addressing basic needs and building goals around meeting those needs. ​ We view CBT for grief and depression as having two overarching goals for symptom reduction and our work in therapy: Restore healthy functioning in thoughts, perceptions and beliefs Restore healthy functioning in ability and behavior ​ In trying to meet these goals, we may assign homework to attempt between sessions, and then act as an accountability resource for this homework. This homework will likely include using coping skills we have discussed in session together. We often provide you with a few options for homework assignments, and then empower you to choose the one that seems both doable and still somewhat challenging. In session together, we will discuss how the loss or depression has affected your thoughts and perceptions about yourself, the world and how can function in it. We will work to challenge thoughts and perceptions that may have been negatively skewed by your experience. Examples of these may be: ​ “The whole world is unsafe.” “Everyone is out to get me.” “I will never feel normal/like myself again.” “I’m not worthy of….” “I need this (unhealthy habit) to escape how I feel every day.” ​ As we go along, we will continue to acknowledge and celebrate your successes as well as re-evaluate what parts of treatment are helpful, and what parts of treatment need fine tuning to better meet your needs. Together we will get you back to living the life you deserve.

— Elyse Gong, Clinical Social Worker in Berkeley, CA

Healing depression often starts with changes in how you talk to yourself and in what you do. One of the most effective methods of treating depression is "behavioral activation". Think of it as baby steps, small steps but persistent. Treatment incorporates sleep, nutrition and exercise - self care. You learn to cultivate self-compassion, and how to not believe that voice that tears you down.

— Dr. Laura Forsyth, Psychologist in Camarillo, CA
 

When a client tells me they have no joy in their life or they have struggles getting out of bed each day, I ask them if they are tired of doing the same things the same way and getting the same results. If you answer yes then depression can be changed. The constant cloud of uncertainty and stagnation does not have to be your day to day. I work with clients to see their life from a different perspective that is self empowering.

— Anna (Kit) Bolliger, Counselor in Asheboro, NC

Depression is chronic pain: grinding, hopeless agony that is hard to imagine if you haven't experienced it. It makes it difficult to look forward, to remember anything other than pain, and impossibly complex to fully enjoy even the most wondrous of events. It is perpetuated by the belief that the depressed person is exaggerating, 'making it up to get attention', or just needs to pull themselves up by their bootstraps. It is often the outcome of painful experiences that overwhelm the person's coping mechanisms, the lack of positive support in crucial periods of development, or just plain genetic legacy. Whatever the source, depression leaves a person feeling that they have no worth, that there is no hope, and that they don't deserve to get better. The truth is: you can feel better, you deserve to feel better, and you can learn how to create a life worth living. Therapy involves challenging old beliefs, and uncovering the person you have the potential to be.

— Katherine Chiba, Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR
 

I can help change some underlying beliefs about yourself and the world that probably were developed when you were little. I find that some of these beliefs have an inter generational component and often are “handed down” from one generation to the next.

— Debbie Bauer, Counselor in Santa Rosa, CA

Depression can bring a unique combination of feeling bad, and not being able to do the things that make you feel better. There's a "double-whammy" when you're down, and feel like you're "messing up" when you can't do the things that may make you feel better. Some people feel a combination of sadness and failure (at not being able to "think my way out of this.") Depression whispers in our ears "I'm never going away ... I'm with you forever ...." But depression is wrong - there are many ways to address depression, and I work with clients like you to discover the ways that work for you.

— Barton Shulman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Francisco, CA
 

Sometimes the reason why someone becomes depressed is not immediately clear to them. Whereas others will attribute their depression to particular life circumstances: loss of a job, loss of finances, loss of a loved one, physical limitations, illness, aging. Some people report they are depressed because they feel helpless or hopeless about changing some aspect of their life. Others report feeling blocked or stuck in guilt, fear, or shame. Whereas others feel their very existence has no purpose or meaning. Also, it is common in depression not to feel connected to others. These are very valid and real forms of suffering. Through 20+ years of research and clinical practice with thousands of patients, I know just how very serious depression can be. I utilize a tailor made set of proven therapy modalities because everyone is unique with their own history and personality, no two people experience depression in the same exact way.

— Dr. Shawna Freshwater, Clinical Psychologist in Miami Beach, FL

Feeling really depressed, angry or hopeless about your future or your current situation? Are you feeling lost right now? I have years of experience working with individuals battling depression or mood related issues.

— Edlyne Thelusma, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Miramar, FL
 

I have experience working with both adults and teenagers dealing with depression. Through analysis of current lift patterns, previous/current trauma, and expectations together we come up with several coping skills to help manage the numerous depressive symptoms and make depression if not better at least less debilitating.

— Kelly Freeman, Counselor in Houston, TX

Have you thought that you are depressed? Has someone else suggested that you are depressed or told you to “shake it off” or “just think happy thoughts”?  Do you feel alone facing this challenge? You do not need to walk this path alone.  As a licensed therapist skilled in mindfulness, meditation, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), I would like to guide you through this walk.  You can begin this journey by calling me at 727-479-6041 for a free telephone consultation.   

— Sara Graff, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Dunedin, FL

Depression or anxiety can have a HUGE impact on your life. It may feel as if it is impossible to complete day to day tasks. It is hard to explain what you are feeling and the impact depression or anxiety is having on your life. It might feel as if you are drowning and you see no way to keep your head above water. If you are looking for therapy and counseling for depression or anxiety, contact me today.

— JADI FERGEN, Counselor in Colorado Springs, CO
 

Depression goes deeper than just feeling sad. It can be lonely. It often eats at one's self-esteem and isolates you. Like anxiety, there are usually some core beliefs behind these feelings and I'll work with you to discover those and create new, more flexible core beliefs.

— Lauri Shedd, Clinical Social Worker in St Louis, MO

It's normal to feel sad or blue from time to time, but if you've been feeling down for more than 2 weeks, talking to someone can help. Together we will focus on creating space to process your unique feelings and experience, explore underlying causes, and help you create the changes you need to start feeling better.

— Stevie Atkins, Therapist in Toronto,
 

I work with people struggling with self esteem, anxiety, depression, relationship problems, addiction as well as lack of motivation and fear of success. Working with me you will choose the direction you want to go, while accessing different behavior change strategies to create your own one-of-a-kind road to success.

— Justin Mink, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Culver City, CA

Feeling sad, lonely, or depressed on a regular basis can be overwhelming. It feels like a heavy weight has to be lifted just to do the simplest things. The fog of discouragement makes work, caring for family and loved ones, school, and even simple chores all seem difficult. Fortunately, depression is very treatable. In therapy: -You will be heard and fully understood. -We'll set goals that are meaningful and important to you. -I'll teach powerful tools to help you feel better and stay better.

— Aaron Deri, Marriage & Family Therapist in Scarsdale, NY
 

Depression is just too much for any person to have to live with. It is a disorder that makes you feel like nothing can ever really change, which simply isn't true! If you have been feeling blue more days than not for at least the three weeks, there is a good possibility that you are feeling depressed. You don't need to continue to try to handle this condition on your own. Depression thrives in isolation, so call me today and let me know what is going on. You deserve to be happy.

— Cheryl Deaner, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco,
 

Depressed mood is problematic for many people to varying degrees, from mid to severe and unrelenting, and it can be experienced differently by different people. My strongest area of expertise is in treating depression and co-occurring problems including anxiety and alcohol misuse. I have conducted original research on ruminating, expressive writing, and experiential avoidance associated with depressed moods.

— Carrie Dodrill, Psychologist in Houston, TX

I have over 20 years' experience successfully treating depression using scientifically supported approaches such as cognitive behavioral therapy and interpersonal therapy. Additionally, I have conducted and published research relevant to the treatment of depression.

— Christine Scher, Psychologist in Pasadena, CA
 

We will work together on creating a plan that will help you feel empowered, motivated, and happy.

— Paulishia Augillard, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX
 

Depression is a dark cloud that surrounds you in both space and time. It reaches into your past so that you only remember your failures and painful interactions. It reaches into your future so that you can only see a continuation of those failures and pains. Counseling can help you come back to the present and lighten that cloud so you can see more clearly what is actually around you. I help people reconnect with meaning and their bodies to lessen the force of depression.

— Peter Addy, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Portland, OR

Many clients come to me with some form of depression. Whether having arisen recently, or as a long-standing pattern in one's life, making certain changes and addressing aspects of one's personal history and perspective can start to relieve depressive symptoms. Though not always indicated or desired, I am comfortable with standard anti-depressant medications and can assist in the decision to start or stop medications with an appropriate referral to a Psychiatrist for medication management. I strongly support alternative therapies for depression as well.

— Bear Korngold, Clinical Psychologist in San Francisco, CA
 

My approach is eclectic, allowing space for a broad exploration of depression that includes spiritual and existential concerns. Life's challenges provide an opportunity for deep transformation. Depression can be an entry to such learning.

— Loretta Staples, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in New Haven, CT

As a narrative therapist, I have helped several individuals navigate feelings of sadness and depression in their lives.

— Karen Mittet, Counselor in Bellingham, WA
 

While everyone experiences some form of depression during their life, I work with those people who are suffering from severe, intractable depression, whether it be situational or clinical. I believe that with insight and awareness into the “whys” of their depression, they are able to find new ways to cope and begin to live the life they have dreamt of living . I do believe that some forms of depression are clinical and often medication is a useful adjunct to the therapy process. However, choosing to use medication is a personal decision by the client and it is not until we have completed a full history and assessment of their symptoms that we may make the decision to go that route. I believe there is help and there is hope and fighting this terrible disease. And hope is the most important part of the therapy process.

— Debra Schnack, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR

Our unconscious mind is constantly scanning our world for threats, physical or emotional, so it can decide if it is safe (think fight/flight/freeze). It is only after this happens that conscious thought begins, which leads to our feelings. Once you begin to understand how this influences your feelings and behaviors, you can start to make changes and learn techniques to reduce your depression and anxiety so you can become a happier, healthier you.

— Deborah Robinson-Thompson, Mental Health Counselor in Burlington, MA
 

Depression is a term that includes a range of symptoms that include sadness, lack of motivation, lack of creativity, loneliness and more. I have assisted many clients in recovery from depression by working through what is causing the grief. The end result varies by person, but success is being able to identify how one wants to feel and then realizing that they are feeling that as a result of therapy.

— Liz Imparato, Licensed Professional Counselor in Phoenix, AZ

I frequently use a combination of interpersonal therapy, CBT, guided imagery, narrative therapy and build up natural supports to address depressive symptoms. The approach is always modified dependent on the individual's needs and severity of symptoms.

— Felicity Colangelo, Clinical Social Worker in Portland, ME

Depression can be a powerful force disrupting quality of life. It impacts the individual's thoughts, emotions, and physical health. It can be helpful to address depression from the "outside in" with specific planning and support to get reengaged with life "out there". Also it can be helpful to address depression from the "inside out" by learning new ways to related to challenging emotions and by gaining insight into the underpinnings of each person's unique emotional patterns. Compassionate, intentional, and skillful approaches to depression can transform a person's inner and outer life as a means to rise out of depression.

— Wes Harris, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Depression can be a reaction to external or internal circumstances, or both. We will find out what it is that is causing you to show symptoms of depression and then together find ways to address the things that are bringing you down. Sometimes depression is physical enough that medication support is warranted. Together we will understand your experience and find ways forward. Depression is usually treatable. You do not have to feel this way forever.

— Hugh Simmons, Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX

I have over 10 years working with people with major depression with very good success helping them reach recovery using mindfulness based treatment.

— Jenna Rasmussen, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Treating depression takes time and desication and I understand that both of those elements are needed to make good progress. I utilize CBT in changing thought patterns that can cause or prolong depression.

— Lissa Merkel, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA

I provide compassionate, mindfulness-based counseling to process what may be causing depression, help access resources in the self for more resiliency, and help you find more contentment in life.

— Stuart Malkin, Counselor in Portland, OR

Getting out of depression is more than just making a decision to have a good day. We talk about latent issues that may contribute to low mood and sense of hopelessness.

— Shawn Beard, Licensed Professional Counselor in Pittsburgh, PA
 

Depression affects different people in different ways. Oftentimes, the lack of motivation and sense of hopelessness can lead to significant changes in daily functioning. The goal is to help you get back on your feet in ways that don't feel forced, and to have space to talk freely about the struggles you encounter along the way

— Sweta Venkataramanan, in New York, NY

Many people describe Depression as "a dark cloud over my life that just wont go away." Depression is one of the most challenging, yet one of the most common psychiatric disorders. Different from popular belief, it is not prolonged sadness. Sadness is a normal and expected part of being alive and human, depression is not. One of the most prominent symptoms is called "Anhedonia" or the inability to experience pleasure. Things you once enjoyed just seem dull and bland, your motivation is zapped, and you find yourself wanting to isolate or be alone. Those who seek help for depression often report feeling "like a black cloud is always hovering over me" and are burdened by excessive guilt. Changes in appetite and sleep are often common too. In fact, difficulty falling asleep and/or waking up early in the morning without being able to fall back asleep are common early symptoms of a depressive episode. Excessive fatigue, irritability, feelings of emptiness, and difficulty concentrating are other common complaints. Good news is, it is easily treatable! I have helped many face their depression, learn new skills, and regain their old vitality. Don't wait until it takes over your life, the earlier you seek help, the better off you will be and the more likely you will be able to avoid depressive episodes in the future.

— Mitch Keil, Psychologist in Newport Beach, CA
 

I work with clients who are looking to move through times of sadness and feelings of depression. Somatic psychotherapy can help by uncovering the roots of how your depression started and how depression affects your body. You see, depression is not only a feeling state. It also gets expressed in your body, which includes your thought patterns and the specific habits you have when you are feeling down. With the support of a somatic psychotherapist, you can begin to explore blocks to your own emotional healing and wellness. Through this type of exploration and self-study in mindfulness, you can begin to tap into feelings of wholeness and pleasure. With this new awareness and understanding of both your mind and body you will have more choice and options the next time you are feeling down.

— Melody Wright, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

Most people experience sadness at times, as our moods fluctuate depending on the context occurring in our lives. Sadness is only one aspect of depression and some people with depression may not experience sadness at all. Symptoms vary depending on each unique individual, and I would want to understand how various identities/experiences could be impacting your symptoms. I will help teach you about the interaction between your thoughts, feelings, and actions in order to manage depression.

— Marshall Bewley, Psychologist in Denton, TX
 

Sometimes the reason why someone becomes depressed is not immediately clear to them. Whereas others will attribute their depression to particular life circumstances: loss of a job, loss of finances, loss of a loved one, physical limitations, illness, aging. Some people report they are depressed because they feel helpless or hopeless about changing some aspect of their life. Others report feeling blocked or stuck in guilt, fear, or shame. Whereas others feel their very existence has no purpose or meaning. Also, it is common in depression not to feel connected to others. These are very valid and real forms of suffering. Through 20+ years of research and clinical practice with thousands of patients, I know just how very serious depression can be. I utilize a tailor made set of proven therapy modalities because everyone is unique with their own history and personality, no two people experience depression in the same exact way.

— Dr. Shawna Freshwater, Clinical Psychologist in Miami Beach, FL

Are you living with anxiety & stress, struggling just to make it through the day? Are you facing difficult life challenges or living with a loved ones addiction? Finding Peace Counseling Wellness & Yoga provides hope & healing when needed most. Specializing in Trauma Informed Care, Motivational Interviewing & Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. If you choose, gentle movement , mindfulness & breath work can be used to assist with managing symptoms of depression.

— Karyn Bramanti-McGuire, Clinical Social Worker in New Port Richey, FL
 

I believe my role as a therapist is to offer support as my clients navigate their life journeys, and not to simply tell them what to do. It is immensely rewarding to witness a flicker of hope in the eyes of a client struggling with depression, hear their long-forgotten hearty laugh, or help them recognize their inner greatness. It's an honor to be able to help overcome their obstacles and share their successes.

— Jessica Sassoon, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Los Angeles, CA

Depressions is a fact of life for so many. When you have a total loss of motivation and apathy about everything going on around you, life gets that much more difficult. Things pile up, relationships suffer, and you'd just rather stay in bed. I help clients learn to accept that depression is not being lazy or a character flaw, but something that just happens. I teach ways to be kind to yourself while this is happening and assess what to put your limited energy toward.

— Jacqueline "Jackie" Abeling, Marriage & Family Therapist in Maple Grove, MN

Over the years, we have helped thousands of patients who have come to us, eager for assistance and hopeful for recovery and a chance at a better quality of life. At Hope Therapy and Wellness Center, we understand that you have personal and mental health goals, and we will do everything we can to help you get to where you want to be. We strive to create personalized treatment plans designed for you and your lifestyle.

— HOPE Therapy and Wellness Center, Licensed Professional Counselor in Springfield, VA
 

Depression may feel light a heavy blanket or your mind is foggy. The flavor of depression varies and depends on the person. Regardless, I find it’s helpful to provide mind-body techniques & teach different wellbeing practices. I also offer creative outlets to help release whatever is stuck & explore what might be causing issues. I'm compassionate & commit to helping you build your own self-compassion. None of us escape difficulty, but learning how to be & flow with life’s lows is transformative.

— Emily Natale, Creative Art Therapist in Salem, MA

I have worked extensively with serious depression and understand what treatment options there are, how to help clients begin to move out of the depression, when to seek medical consultation, how to deal with suicidal thoughts.

— Rowena Dodson, Marriage & Family Therapist in Mountain View, CA

Depression is a dark cloud that surrounds you in both space and time. It reaches into your past so that you only remember your failures and painful interactions. It reaches into your future so that you can only see a continuation of those failures and pains. Counseling can help you come back to the present and lighten that cloud so you can see more clearly what is actually around you. I help people reconnect with meaning and their bodies to lessen the force of depression.

— Peter Addy, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Find hope out of the dark tunnel of despair.

— Gerda Phillips, Counselor in Phoenix, AZ

Depression comes in many forms and looks different as a presenting problem. Although it has become a pop word, it is not a character flaw or personality type. I work with clients to unearth the seed for them that bloomed into depression.

— Rochelle Marecheau, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Atlanta, GA
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is the best treatment for depression according to all research. This approach focuses on changing our thoughts in order to change our feelings and thus changing our behaviors. I have extensive experience and training using this treatment to help individuals improve their moods and become happier with their lives.

— Judy Nemmers, Clinical Social Worker in West Des Moines, IA