Mindfulness-based Therapy

Mindfulness-based approaches to therapy lead with mindfulness, promoting the practice as an important part of good mental health. Mindfulness is the psychological process of bringing one's attention to the internal and external experiences occurring in the present moment, which can be developed through the practice of meditation and other training. Simply put, mindfulness encourages and teaches us to fully live in the present moment. Through the practice of mindfulness we can learn to be present with our thoughts, emotions, relationships, and problems – and the more present we are, the more workable they become. It’s not about “positive thinking,” – it’s about not taking negative thoughts so seriously. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s mindfulness-based therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

I've been mentored in mindfulness meditation practices by clinical psychologist & Insight Meditation Society co-founder & Spirit Rock Meditation Center founder Jack Kornfield, Ph.D. & has also been a mindfulness student of clinical psychologist and Insight Meditation Community of Washington, D.C. founder Tara Brach, Ph.D. Francesca has sat in silent retreat cumulatively for several months. I often integrate mindfulness teachings to help support ways of working with challenging experiences.

— Francesca Maxime, Therapist in Brooklyn, NY
 

To me, mindfulness is about being honest about what's true in the here-and-now rather than applying ideas about what "should" be. Together, we move past all the "shoulds" and work with the present moment to feel better and live more fully.

— Abigail Thompson, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

Mindfulness-based therapy combines cognitive behavioral techniques with mindfulness strategies in order to help individuals better understand and manage their thoughts and emotions in order to achieve relief from feelings of distress. You will learn meditation techniques as well as basic principles of cognition, such as the relationship between the way you think and how you feel. You will also have the opportunity to learn more about your depressive condition.

— Jennifer Harvey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Livonia, MI
 

I began studying Yoga and mindfulness-based meditation nearly fifty years ago and have been using a mindfulness-based approach with my clients for more than fifteen years. I have utilized Jon Kabat-Zinn's Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction practices with clients and with myself and have been a devoted student of Zen Buddhism since the 1980's. Mindfulness of body, breath, feelings, sensations, thoughts, impulses, energy patterns and environment are key to living a rich, full and meaningful life.

— Peter Carpentieri, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

Using the here and now to address and improve our abilities to live in the moment. Allowing those present moments to take us to our calm during times of distress

— Shatoria Crowley, Licensed Professional Counselor in Broken Arrow, OK
 

Focus is strategic. The goal is to obtain an increased awareness of body movements and sensations, breathing, and emotional state in the present moment. Being able to recognize exactly what is happening and how to respond in order to get what is needed is the desired outcome.

— Alisa Zachery, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

Mindfulness has multiple therapeutic benefits. I provide psychoeducation about how these practices help us to effect change within the body and mind, teach and practice specific mindfulness practices with you in session. Helping you to learn how to take a "Mindful Stance" to generalize these skills from formal practices throughout your daily life. Allowing you to develop a growing sense of compassion for yourself as you begin to be less judgmental and self-critical.

— Teresa Petersen, Clinical Social Worker in Houston, TX
 

I use mindful self compassion to work with clients to practice self compassion, self love and self forgiveness. I have been using this in my practice with multiple clients and have taken classes to learn to be more effective at teaching and processing with my clients to practice self love. Mental illness and gender dysphoria can be difficult to deal with at times and I really want my clients to practice kindness to themselves during their difficult moments.

— Katie Leikam, Clinical Social Worker in Decatur, GA

Mindfulness Self Compassion Coaching This path explores a deeper aspect of yourself, The mindfulness approach has a large psychoeducational aspect along with weekly meditation assignments related to your goals. In our sessions we will discuss your mediation or mindfulness assignment, I will have teaching to share and then discuss how you can and did apply these skills to YOUR life. We still have your goals and concerns we address weekly or biweekly.

— Christina Spinler, Psychotherapist in Tulsa, OK
 

Mindfulness Self Compassion Coaching This path explores a deeper aspect of yourself, The mindfulness approach has a large psychoeducational aspect along with weekly meditation assignments related to your goals. In our sessions we will discuss your mediation or mindfulness assignment, I will have teaching to share and then discuss how you can and did apply these skills to YOUR life. We still have your goals and concerns we address weekly or biweekly.

— Christina Spinler, Psychotherapist in Tulsa, OK

Using mindful self-compassion, I work with you on a journey of self acceptance, body awareness, self-compassion and love, so you can be supported and affirmed as you are. Not everyone has the same door in to awareness and self-care. Let's learn more about what makes you tick, so you can feel understood and make more positive connections with others. You can do this! I can help.

— Rebecca Lavine, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Cambridge, MA
 

Most of us have a tendency to be hard on ourselves. Mindful Self-Compassion is an empirically-supported modality designed to help us find the inner strength of self-compassion for personal growth and self-acceptance. Developed by doctors Kristin Neff and Christopher Germer, MSC focuses on helping us learn to respond to difficult moments in our lives with self-kindness, care, and understanding. Self-compassion helps us to more fully embrace being human - and more fully embrace being ourselves.

— Jack Rubin, Counselor

I use mindfulness with my clients to help decrease anxiety. Often future thoughts lead to anxiety. Yoga, breathing, and meditation are valuable tools for healing in multiple areas.

— Angie Gutekunst, Licensed Professional Counselor in Bethlehem, PA
 

Several years of practice experience helping individuals to declutter and simplify their lives, through teaching mindfulness based techniques of Emotion Regulation, Distress Tolerance and Grounding skills to be present in the here and now.

— Kerrian McKay, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Manassas, VA

As a Registered Yoga Teacher (RYT-200), I love incorporating a variety of mindfulness, meditation, and yoga practices into my therapy. Yoga and mindfulness completely transformed my life and being able to share that with others is incredibly rewarding!

— Charlotte Pennington, Psychologist in Lakeway, TX
 

Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy, or MBCT, is designed for people who suffer from repeated bouts of depression or chronic unhappiness. It combines the ideas of cognitive therapy with meditative practices and attitudes based on the cultivation of mindfulness. MBCT helps people separate themselves from their thoughts and moods, and teaches them how to recognize their sense of being. It also aims to give participants the necessary tools to combat depressive symptoms as they arise.

— Julie Williams, Counselor

I have many years experience in mindfulness and compassion-based therapy. Learning to relate to ourselves with greater kindness offers a path for personal growth in so many areas of our lives.

— Ellen Adams, Licensed Professional Counselor