Mindfulness-based Therapy

Mindfulness-based approaches to therapy lead with mindfulness, promoting the practice as an important part of good mental health. Mindfulness is the psychological process of bringing one's attention to the internal and external experiences occurring in the present moment, which can be developed through the practice of meditation and other training. Simply put, mindfulness encourages and teaches us to fully live in the present moment. Through the practice of mindfulness we can learn to be present with our thoughts, emotions, relationships, and problems – and the more present we are, the more workable they become. It’s not about “positive thinking,” – it’s about not taking negative thoughts so seriously. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s mindfulness-based therapy experts today.

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Mindfulness is a way of being in the world that helps to increase our awareness of our behaviors, but also our choices and possibilities in changing our behaviors. The practice of mindfulness gives us space to breathe, to be, and to learn to approach our patterns with compassion and self-awareness. I teach mindfulness skills to clients, as well as working on my own ongoing practice in mindfulness. I have attended a MBSR-class and engage in ongoing learning on this topic.

— Kelley O'Hanlon, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Redmond, WA

As a seasoned practitioner of mindfulness-based therapy, I offer a wealth of expertise in guiding individuals towards greater self-awareness, emotional balance, and resilience. My approach combines evidence-based techniques with compassionate guidance, fostering transformative growth and well-being.

— Natika Johnson, Licensed Professional Counselor in Katy, TX
 

Mindfulness therapy focuses on learning how to be more aware of one's thoughts, feelings, emotions, surroundings and learn how to become more aware in your current environment.

— Chad Inker, Licensed Professional Counselor in Newtown, PA

Mindfulness is more than a catch-phrase or trend. Mindfulness takes that mind-body connection and can offer some very immediate relief. I start with simple techniques during our sessions. Then, you slowly have a wealth of ways to improve your mood. Mindfulness may not be the entire solution to your symptoms. But, mindfulness is a powerful tool to help guide your mood and anxiety to a more healthy place.

— Sara Fischer Sanford, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in SAN FRANCISCO, CA
 

Mindfulness plays a major role in my practice, as I believe it along with other positive psychology practices, like gratitude, can lead to deeper fulfillment. Through graduate and additional trainings, I have learned to effectively incorporate mindfulness with other modalities.

— Juli Walchuk, Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY

I have training as a meditation and mindfulness teacher. I have been a practicing Buddhist now for over 25 years. That said, I only incorporate evidence-based mindfulness approaches into my practice. And as a former executive (now business owner), I also coach clients who need help with professional skills such as time management, project management, and managing people.

— Darrin Pfannenstiel, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Dallas, TX
 

I have participated in and completed several trainings surrounding mindfulness-based therapy.

— Katie LCSW, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

Mindfulness can help create a sense of peace and connectedness to our inner selves, bodies, and surroundings that we often lose in our modern lifestyle. I love to help my clients connect with the present to find more meaning, joy, and healing within their lives.

— Heather Romero, Counselor in Atlanta, GA
 

I have used mindfulness techniques for many years and find them useful in settling in to the safe space where therapy happens most effectively. Genuinely being in our bodies is a rare experience in life today, and having that ability to "be where you are" can help us tap into our authentic selves more readily. This, in turn, helps us to ask for what we truly need and to be the person we truly are.

— Rocky Bonsal, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

As a therapist, I specialize in guiding women towards cultivating a profound connection with their bodies. Through mindfulness practices, we explore the present moment without judgment, fostering a compassionate understanding of thoughts and sensations. This transformative approach enables women to break free from societal pressures, promoting self-love and acceptance. By incorporating mindfulness into therapy, we unravel the intricacies of body image, empowering individuals to build healthier

— Jacqueline Richards-Shrestha, Licensed Professional Counselor in Boulder, CO
 

I believe that cultivating a greater awareness of ourselves and our environments through a lens of self compassion and non-judgmental acceptance is a tremendously important step toward growth and change.

— Renee Floer, Licensed Professional Counselor in South Carolina, SC

I believe that it is essential to understand the connection between physical, mental, and emotional health by being in the present moment in the most nonjudgmental way possible to develop increased awareness of thoughts and feelings. I work to assist clients in developing skills to enhance this awareness and nurture a sense of inner peace.

— Antonio Rudo, Licensed Professional Counselor in Hoboken, NJ
 

Mindfulness therapy helps clients develop a deeper awareness of their thoughts, emotions, feelings, surroundings, and situations. Mindfulness-based therapies use meditation, relaxation, and awareness exercises to help focus on the present moment, aiming over time to experience everyday situations and stressors in nonjudgmental and non-reactionary ways.

— Kristi Cash White, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

Mindfulness-based approaches to therapy lead with mindfulness, promoting the practice as an important part of good mental health. Mindfulness is the psychological process of bringing one's attention to the internal and external experiences occurring in the present moment, which can be developed through the practice of meditation and other training. Simply put, mindfulness encourages and teaches us to fully live in the present moment with with our thoughts, emotions, relationships, and problems.

— Colby Schneider, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR
 

I have been deeply engage in mindfulness-based practices for over a decade, and integrate a trauma-informed mindfulness approach in all the clinical work I do.

— Kristin Tucker, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Seattle, WA

I have a personal practice of nearly 15 years, and have been implementing it into my work for a decade. I have completed MBSR and am currently completing the MBSR teacher training track. I have also completed training to teach mindfulness through Mindful Schools.

— Shane Rice, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Greenwood, IN
 

Mindfulness is the act of being aware of your sensations and emotions in the present moment, something that many of us struggle with in our fast-paced society. When working with clients who struggle to slow down, I implement mindfulness-based therapy to help them ground themselves and become more relaxed.

— Brianna Costantino, Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY

I participated in an 8 week course of Mindful Self-Compassion that was developed by Kristin Neff and Chris Germer.

— Mary Ann Wertz, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denver, CO