Mindfulness-based Therapy

Mindfulness-based approaches to therapy lead with mindfulness, promoting the practice as an important part of good mental health. Mindfulness is the psychological process of bringing one's attention to the internal and external experiences occurring in the present moment, which can be developed through the practice of meditation and other training. Simply put, mindfulness encourages and teaches us to fully live in the present moment. Through the practice of mindfulness we can learn to be present with our thoughts, emotions, relationships, and problems – and the more present we are, the more workable they become. It’s not about “positive thinking,” – it’s about not taking negative thoughts so seriously. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s mindfulness-based therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

Mindfulness-based therapy is an integrative approach to psychotherapy that utilizes cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) methods in collaboration with mindfulness meditative practices and similar psychological strategies. This strategic approach helps clients shift their attention, to the present moment, while suspending judgment. We can't get rid of judgment, however, we can learn to suspend it as a strategy for better regulating emotions and increasing distress tolerance.

— Dr. Sylvia Kalicinski-Don, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Miami Beach, FL 33140, FL
 

Mindfulness occurs when we learn how to "be" through learning how to pay attention to our thoughts, feelings and body responses without judgment. When we learn and practice mindfulness skills we are better able to respond to life events and this allows us to be fully present in these events. Mindfulness therapy is also helpful in working through traumas and helping to create healthier ways to heal from past events. As an EMDR trained trauma therapist and yoga teacher I can help you heal.

— Marcy Humphrey, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Boise, ID

Particularly helpful for clients who are working with self-esteem and self-acceptance, or want to learn how to set boundaries with kindness. It helps us be more in the present moment, beneath the stream of thoughts and stories that run throughout the day. Working in the present moment can bring so much insight and relief from the unconscious patterns that often run our life.

— Devona Snook, Counselor in San Francisco, CA
 

The core of mindfulness is to pay attention to the present without judgement. This can be very difficult. It can also be very rewarding. As you practice accepting your experiences of pain and loss, you can identify less with them and open yourself up to more kinds of experiences. Mindfulness-based therapies are essential to harm reduction and integration work.

— Peter Addy, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Vancouver, WA

I have taken several courses in Mindfulness-based therapy and practice these techniques in my personal life. I teach a MIndfulness/Meditation class at the local community college.

— Carol Tjaden, Counselor in Waterloo, IA
 

Mindfulness-based therapy uses the practice of mindfulness to promote good mental and physical health. Mindfulness therapy can help anyone, especially those who are new to the practice of mindfulness. Being trained in mindfulness-based therapy, I have helped people with mental health issues like depression, addiction, anxiety, and other mental conditions. It can also help if you have physical problems that are causing or caused by your mental health issues.

— Joshua Weinreb, Licensed Professional Counselor in North Canton, OH

In a world where we are constantly connected, have more demands, and move faster than ever before, being able to stay present in the here and now proves more and more difficult. Teaching clients about mindfulness (no, it's not just meditation!) and practicing ways to stay present has helped many of those I've worked with feel more centered, less anxious, and more in control. Mindfulness changes our brains to be less anxious and depressed and more content and at peace.

— Sarah Hagen, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Fairfax, VA
 

I am trained in Mindfulness techniques and provide monthly Mindfulness sessions for teachers in a Baltimore City public school. This is a component of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy and can be used as a building block for other DBT skills or as a standalone therapy for anxiety and depression.

— Evan Wilson, Social Worker in Baltimore, MD

All of my clients will tell you, I consistently ask them how they are feeling & what they are noticing at any given moment during our sessions. So many of us have learned to dissociate from our bodies and feelings that we have no idea what is going on inside. Mindfulness allows us to re-engage our parasympathetic nervous system when we are stressed out. It teaches us that we can regulate our response to stress in a way that is healthy and manageable.

— Cynthia Goeller, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in ,
 

Mindfulness therapy means firstly to have a daily mindfulness practice and to use what we learn from it to remain mindful, aware, during the difficult situations in life. In particular we become aware of our • thoughts “I must be stupid to do this”, • feelings: sadness, anger etc, • behaviour: aggression, withdrawing, doing a breathing exercise • physiological changes: fast breathing, weight in stomach, pins and needles, nausea.

— Kathy Hicks, Counselor in Whitehouse, TX

Mindfulness is in the sweet spot of what I love most about psychology: it's where neuroscience intersects with spiritual practice. In the last few decades there has been an explosion of research into why meditation practice helps us live more connected, grounded lives. I like to teach mindfulness techniques to help develop metacognition (thinking about what and how we're thinking), self-esteem, and emotion regulation.

— Duff Stoneson, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Austin, TX
 

When we practice mindfulness, we focus on the "here and now", rather than on past regrets or future concerns. What bodily sensations, thoughts, and feelings am I experiencing in the present moment? By tracking these experiences with an attitude of non-judgement, curiosity, and compassion, we become more aware of our internal states and the sources of those feelings, and can therefore transform them into new mental perspectives.

— Nyambura Kihato, Licensed Professional Counselor in Duluth, GA

Many years of training in Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction techniques, experiential, guided imagery, self-compassion and other anxiety hacks.

— Julie Noble, Clinical Social Worker in Bethesda, MD
 

A foundation of mindfulness helps: - develop deeper awareness of what is happening - cultivate a level of acceptance of whatever is going on and ultimately - lead to greater congruence between thoughts, feelings, and actions- authenticity

— Jennie Powe Runde, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

Being mindful can make it easier to savor the pleasures in life as they occur, help you become fully engaged in activities, and create a greater capacity to deal with adverse events. Many individuals report greater resiliency and deeper self-compassion. I've been fortunate to study with some amazing individuals in the field including Jack Kornfield and Tara Brach. I love helping others nurture their strengths and own inner wisdom with mindfulness.

— Nicole Craig, Licensed Professional Counselor in Milwaukie, OR
 

For several decades, the science has continued to show: enhancing our awareness of breath, body, thoughts and emotions can be the key to reducing stress and firmly establishing a solid ground beneath us towards healing, recovery, and increased positive emotions. I have over 20 years of experience and training in mindfulness approaches, which I integrate within a psychodynamic-relational frame when appropriate.

— Ben Greenberg, PsyD, Clinical Psychologist in Athens, GA
 

In a world where we are constantly connected, have more demands, and move faster than ever before, being able to stay present in the here and now proves more and more difficult. Teaching clients about mindfulness (no, it's not just meditation!) and practicing ways to stay present has helped many of those I've worked with feel more centered, less anxious, and more in control. Mindfulness changes our brains to be less anxious and depressed and more content and at peace.

— Sarah Hagen, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Fairfax, VA

Learn and practice what all the hype is about surrounding mindfulness, gratitude, meditation, and feeling more calm throughout the day. We will develop an individualized practice that works for you to better handle life’s challenges and struggles to be a more peaceful person.

— Dr. Dan Sneider-Cotter, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in ,
 

I incorporate tailored mind-body approaches to each person so that they can use them as needed when stressful moments show up.

— Daniela Paolone, Marriage & Family Therapist in Westlake Village, CA

Mindfulness and Self Compassion interventions are helpful in treating depression, anxiety, stress and other issues that effect our overall wellbeing. Through mindfulness and compassion, we cultivate the ability to stay present to our moment to moment experience (i.e. thoughts, emotions, sensations) meeting it with understanding and compassion. Meeting challenging experiences with acceptance, wisdom and compassion allows us to live a more balanced joyful life.

— Cindy Ricardo, Counselor in Coral Springs, FL
 

No single method of psychotherapy works for everyone. I use an eclectic approach based on an individual's unique concerns informed by past experiences and current therapy goals.

— Tina Gutman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in West Bloomfield, MI

Working in the present, we explore the thoughts, experiences and lessons that get in the way of celebrating who you are.

— Janet Zinn, Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY
 

Mindfulness-based therapy is something that I avoid for most of my career until about 5 years ago. I found it nearly impossible to enagged in mindfulness or meditation. I, like most people. were confused about the purpose and the process. It's not about "not thinking" or clearing your mind, it's about noticing and not engaging with all thoughts in your mind. I find that this approach complements other types of therapy well. It decreases the amount of "foot in mouth moments" also.

— Maria Carrington, Therapist in Lakewood, WA