Motivational Interviewing

Motivational interviewing (MI) is a goal-focused, client-centered counseling approach developed, in part, by clinical psychologists William R. Miller and Stephen Rollnick. The goal of MI is to help people resolve ambivalent feelings and insecurities and find the motivation they need to change their behavior. Although motivational interviewing was first used for problem drinking and others with substance abuse issues, it has been proven effective for many people struggling with making healthier choices. This therapeutic technique works especially well with those who start off resistive, unmotivated or unprepared for change (and less well on those who are already prepared and motivated to change). Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s motivational interviewing specialists today.

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My first foray into addiction counseling included training in Motivational Interviewing. Since that time, I have utilized that model to work with clients and found it to be exceedingly helpful with all types of clients. I have regularly engaged in workshops and training focused on Motivational Interviewing because of the success I have found in utilizing this approach.

— Love Singleton, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Cape Coral, FL

This method will help you resolve ambivalent feelings and insecurities to find the internal motivation they need to change their behavior. It is a practical, empathetic, and short-term process that takes into consideration how difficult it is to make life changes. It is also non-judgmental and conversational.

— Alexandra Stark, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Brecksville, OH
 

Change is hard! And why shouldn't it be? As much as we may want to change things, it's also scary and frustrating. Let's talk about it.

— Karen Noyes, Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY

Motivational Interviewing is a style of psychotherapy that is built from Person-Centered therapy and has much research supporting it's efficacy. I have advanced training on this style of treatment and I rely on it heavily in every session. The purpose of this style of therapy is to elicit a client's intrinsic reasons to want to change and to build motivation through a dialogue.

— Ryan Thurwachter-King, Psychotherapist
 

I have completed several courses and post graduate seminars on practical applications of and how to implement Motivational Interviewing. This is a modality of treatment that is helpful for resolving ambiguity which can sometimes keep us stuck in a negative behavior or a negative perception about our abilities.

— Kevin Taylor, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in forest hills, NY

Change is hard. If change was easy, we wouldn't struggle with it as a society as often as we do. Substance and alcohol use disorders, gambling addiction, food addiction, etc. When others try to tell us that we NEED to do in order to make changes in our life, this can lead to feeling defeated and/or defensive. MI is an approach that helps clients come to change terms that work best for them while promoting intrinsic motivation for positive changes in one's life.

— Kellie A. Ebberup-Krug, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

With a background working in outpatient addiction treatment, I have extensive experience in working with your reasons for wanting to make changes in your life, and enhancing your motivation towards that change.

— Matt McCullough, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern

I was trained through the Veteran's Administration to utilize Motivational Interviewing in every session. Assisting people to identify their barriers and to develop an action plan to achieve their goals can help with every clinical intervention.

— Kirsten Hardy, Clinical Social Worker
 

I have had extensive training in this technique and have been a member of MINT (Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers)

— Jamie Glick, Counselor in Castle Rock, CO

Motivational Interviewing is helpful with clients who are debating any sort of change in their life. It highlights motivation to change while facilitating a process of self-actualization, meaning that the client is in charge of their own behaviors and fate.

— Katie DeVoll, Counselor in New york, NY
 

I have had multiple trainings on MI, and believe it can help help uncover different ways of thinking about a situation.

— Charleen Gonzalez, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Miami, FL

Motivational Interviewing is a stance that explores and supports you own unique change process, on any kind of change you are seeking. Specific techniques can help you identify what motivates you and what sets you back. You will learn tools to help you understand the universal elements of making and maintaining changes - tools that you can use long after therapy ends.

— Karen Keys, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY
 

Sometimes we want to make changes, but, there's something holding us back. It's easy to sit on the fence and talk ourselves out of meaningful action. Motivational Interviewing can help us clarify our goals and get unstuck.

— Danielle Jones, Licensed Professional Counselor in Littleton, CO

There are many benefits of using motivational interviewing in therapy and this approach has been proven successful for many of my clients. Some benefits are allowing patients to talk through their problems, envisioning change, & building confidence.

— Ashley Gentil, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Brooklyn, NY
 

Motivational Interviewing can be helpful in having my clients understand how their chosen actions are influencing quality of life. Sometimes we want to make changes, but, there's something holding us back. It's easy to sit on the fence and talk ourselves out of meaningful action. Motivational Interviewing can help us clarify our goals and get unstuck.

— Aimee Perlmutter, Registered Marriage and Family Therapist Intern

Many people with chronic health conditions have been put into the “sick role”, where they are expected to and rewarded when they passively take in the treatments their all-knowing doctors prescribe. I’m not like that! I want to know what your motivations and goals are for treatment, and I will collaborate with you on your goals, not mine.

— Peter Addy, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I express empathy through reflective listening to what consequences the client has created alone but whose disorder may convince him he has only partially created, and I will describe the discrepancy between clients' goals and the recent behavior, and being I have have many thousands of hours of this behind me, we avoid argument and dissolve the clients resistance to motivate them to begin the work towards dismantling their disorder piece by piece.

— Sexual Misbehavior Absolute Expert James Foley, Psychotherapist in New York, New York, NY

As an addiction professional for over 10 years, MI is a foundational method of helping a client move toward change.

— Gregory Gooden, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in POMONA, CA
 

Change is hard. If change was easy, we wouldn't struggle with it as a society as often as we do. Substance and alcohol use disorders, gambling addiction, food addiction, etc. When others try to tell us that we NEED to do in order to make changes in our life, this can lead to feeling defeated and/or defensive. MI is an approach that helps clients come to change terms that work best for them while promoting intrinsic motivation for positive changes in one's life.

— Kellie A. Ebberup-Krug, Licensed Clinical Social Worker