Motivational Interviewing

Motivational interviewing (MI) is a goal-focused, client-centered counseling approach developed, in part, by clinical psychologists William R. Miller and Stephen Rollnick. The goal of MI is to help people resolve ambivalent feelings and insecurities and find the motivation they need to change their behavior. Although motivational interviewing was first used for problem drinking and others with substance abuse issues, it has been proven effective for many people struggling with making healthier choices. This therapeutic technique works especially well with those who start off resistive, unmotivated or unprepared for change (and less well on those who are already prepared and motivated to change). Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s motivational interviewing specialists today.

Meet the specialists

I have taken coursework and trainings in motivational interviewing. I use it in my daily practice to help guide clients to make the changes that they want in their lives.

— Joseph Beinlich, Therapist in Philadelphia, PA
 

I use MI to help clients identify goals as well as the barriers to the achievement thereof. I provide the space to address ambivalence while ensuring clients never feel judged or evaluated.

— Derrick Palmer, Social Worker in ,

Wrestling with a big decision? Feeling pulled in opposite directions as one part wants to make a change while the other doesn't? Thinking of leaving your job, changing careers, or starting a company? Contemplating whether to smoke less weed or cigarettes? Through Motivational Interviewing, we'll work through ambivalence so you're no longer stuck or conflicted. We'll explore your reasons for change, problem solve barriers, and set you up for success.

— Lisa Andresen, ASW, Associate Clinical Social Worker in San Francisco, CA
 

Making a behavior change is a process, and you are the expert on what is needed for your life. Whether you are not ready to make any change right now, or you just need help maintaining the progress you've already made, I will meet you where you are to help you get to the next place you want to be.

— David Johnson, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Mateo, CA

Many people with chronic health conditions have been put into the “sick role”, where they are expected to and rewarded when they passively take in the treatments their all-knowing doctors prescribe. I’m not like that! I want to know what your motivations and goals are for treatment, and I will collaborate with you on your goals, not mine.

— Peter Addy, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Motivational Interviewing can be helpful in having my clients understand how their chosen actions are influencing quality of life. If poor choices are frequently made, how are these choices not only hurting, but also keeping self distant from those their is a desire to be close to. Together, we will examine all there is to gain by exploring how making better choices can improve quality of life.

— Michael Love, Registered Clinical Social Worker Intern in Jacksonville, FL

This intervention helps people become motivated to change the behaviors that are preventing them from making healthier choices. Research has shown that this intervention works well with individuals who start off unmotivated or unprepared for change. Motivational interviewing is also appropriate for people who are may not be ready to commit to change, but motivational interviewing can help them move through the emotional stages of change necessary to find their motivation.

— Mary Ellen Kundrat, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

Motivational interviewing is about helping people move through ambivalence towards changes that they want to make. We all have ambivalence and this is a NORMAL part of the change process. My goal is to help you understand how change works and help you move through the process while learning to care for yourself.

— Amber Holt, Clinical Social Worker in Gig Harbor, WA

I have attended over 100 hours of training in Motivational Interviewing and led training for other staff on techniques for 2 1/2 years.

— Colleen Steppa, Therapist in Phoenix, AZ
 

I was trained through the Veteran's Administration to utilize Motivational Interviewing in every session. Assisting people to identify their barriers and to develop an action plan to achieve their goals can help with every clinical intervention.

— Kirsten Hardy, Clinical Social Worker

I am certified in Motivational Interviewing, proven to be effective in treating addictions.

— Jennifer Driscoll, Counselor in Mamaroneck, NY
 

Most issues in therapy come back to the topic of ambivalence at some point. Motivational interviewing is able to help you hear your thoughts so that you can let go of whatever is holding you back from a decision.

— Elle Bernfeld, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY

I have had extensive training in this technique and have been a member of MINT (Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers)

— Jamie Glick, Counselor in Castle Rock, CO
 

Finding the motivation you have for making change is like finding the gas station. Your individual motivation will fuel your journey. Many people want to change and find it very difficult to do so. With motivational interviewing I help you discern your values and reasons for making new choices that lead to long-term changes in your life.

— Heidi Gray, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Virtual sessions, CA

Wrestling with a big decision? Feeling pulled in opposite directions as one part wants to make a change while the other doesn't? Thinking of leaving your job, changing careers, or starting a company? Contemplating whether to smoke less weed or cigarettes? Through Motivational Interviewing, we'll work through ambivalence so you're no longer stuck or conflicted. We'll explore your reasons for change, problem solve barriers, and set you up for success.

— Lisa Andresen, ASW, Associate Clinical Social Worker in San Francisco, CA
 

Motivational interviewing is a tool that we all can use in our daily lives. The primary principles of this technique is to use open ended questions in order to deepen the understanding of motivation (stages of change), build rapport, be empathetic to meeting client's needs, and empower self efficacy.

— Heather Nemeth, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Hinsdale, IL

I am a licensed addictions counselor this is a large part of our training and modalities used to determine readiness to change.

— Denae Arnold, Licensed Professional Counselor in Wheatridge, CO
 

Motivational Interviewing is a tool I use to help people identify roadblocks for change. MI can help people identify them and overcome them.

— Betsey Pope, Counselor in St. Louis, MO

With a background working in outpatient addiction treatment, I have extensive experience in working with your reasons for wanting to make changes in your life, and enhancing your motivation towards that change.

— Matt McCullough, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern