Psychodynamic Therapy

Psychodynamic therapy is a therapeutic treatment that primarily focuses on the interpretation of mental and emotional processes. It shares much in common with psychoanalysis and is often considered a simpler, less time consuming alternative. Like psychoanalysis, psychodynamic therapy seeks to reveal the unconscious content of a client's psyche in an effort to alleviate psychic tension. Psychodynamic therapy increases a client’s self-awareness and grows their understanding of the influence of the past on present behavior. It allows clients to examine unresolved conflicts and symptoms that arise from past experiences and explore how they are manifesting themselves in current behaviors, such as the need and desire to abuse substances. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s psychodynamic therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

Having been trained from a depth perspective, I work with my clients to get at the heart of underlying causes of issues so change and healing can occur.

— Tara Parker, Psychotherapist in Glenview, IL
 

I am a classically trained therapist and I specialize in psychodynamic theory. Psychodynamic theory was a focus of mine all through graduate school and I use this theory as a lens into understanding where behaviors, unhealthy and healthy, start from and how they have been reinforced through your lifetime. With a clear understanding of where you come from we can work together to unravel rooted behavior.

— Jeff Guenther, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

The psychodynamic model of therapy is the basis for all forms of psychotherapy and includes psychosocial development as well as allowing for the inclusion of other approaches.

— Jacqueline Burnett-Brown, Marriage & Family Therapist
 

Why is it so hard to feel good in our daily lives, even when nothing particularly bad is happening to us? Why do some situations fill us with dread? Why are we so hard on ourselves? Psychodynamic therapy is an unparalleled evidence-based treatment that helps us explore where our painful thoughts and feelings are coming from. It supports us to look at things we have been taught to avoid that are making us feel unwell. It leads to freedom.

— Tracy Bryce Farmer, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR

Psychodynamic therapy is a therapeutic treatment that primarily focuses on the interpretation of mental and emotional processes. It shares much in common with psychoanalysis and is often considered a simpler, less time consuming alternative. Psychodynamic therapy seeks to reveal the unconscious content of a client's psyche in an effort to alleviate psychic tension.

— Colby Schneider, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Portland, OR
 

Psychodynamic theory is one of the many approaches I take in a session. By looking at our past, we can find what patterns are being repeated and hindering our day to day. By connecting our histories to our presents healing can happen.

— Lindsey King, Counselor in Bensalem, PA

I am psychodynamically oriented in my approach, as this approach places importance on the factors that shaped the individual. Particularly, the development of self during childhood and the lessons that our family of origin or primary caregivers gave us. The patterns from childhood of boundary setting, ability to be assertive, identifying needs, and level of comfort with intimacy continue to impact the present. Identifying these patterns allows us to set new patterns that serve us as adults.

— Jan Tate, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Mebane, NC
 

Psychodynamic therapy is a therapeutic treatment that primarily focuses on the interpretation of mental and emotional processes. It shares much in common with psychoanalysis and is often considered a simpler, less time consuming alternative. Psychodynamic therapy seeks to reveal the unconscious content of a client's psyche in an effort to alleviate psychic tension.

— Colby Schneider, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Portland, OR

Modern Psychodynamic Therapy gets a bad rep but I learned the importance and grace of this type of therapy from a past Supervisor. I use Psychodynamic tenets with clients often, specifically the strength of the therapeutic relationship and how reflection on the past can help us heal for the future.

— Jennifer Kulka, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in San Diego, CA
 

During my graduate studies I immersed myself in coursework related to object relations. I value the theory and approaches refined by the intellectual descendants of Sigmund Freud. During my traineeship, I was supervised by a highly experienced clinician who considered her approach to be informed by object relations theory. I continue to pursue education through the Oregon Psychoanalytic Center.

— Andrew Conner, Registered Marriage and Family Therapist Intern in Portland, OR

Insight can be a powerful conduit for gaining self-awareness of more unconscious, hidden parts of the self. Although behavior in and of itself can be an effective focus on therapy; it is not the only focus.

— Brittney George, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA
 

My approach with Psychodynamic therapy is to help each client to self-reflect and self-examine the use of the relationship between therapist and patient as a window into problematic relationship patterns in the patient's life. It providers an insider perspective and knowledge to better understand the clients relationships with friends, family members and significant others.

— Shawdi Spencer, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Sherman Oaks, CA

By examining past experiences and seeing how they connect to the present, you can become more here-and-now focused and no longer be stuck in the past. Talk therapy that includes the past has been found to be extremely beneficial for many issues.

— Patrick Tully, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

My goal as a therapist is to help make conscious that which is unconscious for you, the patient.

— Sam Naimi, Associate Clinical Social Worker in West Hollywood, CA

Psychodynamic therapy explores the patterns and cycles that have repeated in your life, including patterns of thoughts and feelings. Together, we work to understand these cycles that you may feel trapped by. With that understanding, a path to peace and freedom opens up through self-reflection and self-compassion.

— Liz Fletcher, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oklahoma City, OK