Psychodynamic Therapy

Psychodynamic therapy is a therapeutic treatment that primarily focuses on the interpretation of mental and emotional processes. It shares much in common with psychoanalysis and is often considered a simpler, less time consuming alternative. Like psychoanalysis, psychodynamic therapy seeks to reveal the unconscious content of a client's psyche in an effort to alleviate psychic tension. Psychodynamic therapy increases a client’s self-awareness and grows their understanding of the influence of the past on present behavior. It allows clients to examine unresolved conflicts and symptoms that arise from past experiences and explore how they are manifesting themselves in current behaviors, such as the need and desire to abuse substances. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s psychodynamic therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

Understanding yourself, your childhood, and your origins are essential to understanding who you are today. The feelings, experiences, and/or traumas you experienced growing up and the current circumstances you are dealing with today all play a part in how you react and respond in relationships today. It is really important to have all this information and know who you are, so you can empower yourself for your life today.

— Sarah Greenspan, Psychotherapist in Seal Beach, CA
 

The relationship in therapy is one of the most powerful tools. Having open dialogue, opportunity for real, honest discussion of what's happening in the therapeutic relationship is important and healing. Using a psychodynamic approach allows for the process to evolve naturally.

— Nicole Goudreau-Green, Counselor in Pleasantville, NY

Why psychodynamic/analytic therapy? The here and now psychotherapy relationship opens a stunning window into past, present, and future; into the deep wisdom of the unconscious; and into a creative flexibility that brings more and more wholesomeness, freedom, intimacy, and flourishing of the soul. I have doctoral and postdoctoral training in various contemporary analytic approaches, and I practice from a liberatory, feminist, relational stance.

— Aleisa Myles, Psychologist in Media, PA
 

Psychodynamic theory is one of the many approaches I take in a session. By looking at our past, we can find what patterns are being repeated and hindering our day to day. By connecting our histories to our presents healing can happen.

— Lindsey King, Counselor in Bensalem, PA

The goal of psychodynamic therapy is to assist clients understand how past events in their childhood have a great influence on their adult lives, shaping their personality. Through the therapy process I expose my clients to different aspects of their lives, especially how they attach/interact with others, and how this impacts and generates spikes of anxiety in their lives.

— Filippo M. Forni, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Psychodynamic therapy looks at the roots of current problems in ways of relating to people we established earlier in life. It is a kind of therapy that deals with meaning and not just behavior.

— Greg Freed, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oakland, CA

I believe in treating the client as a whole, and considering how their past experiences may impact their present level of functioning and future goals. Insight and understanding of yourself can greatly impact the choices you make, as well as your view of the society in which we live. I hope for you to become the best, "you," that you want to become. Life can be a complicated journey, but surrounding yourself with positive peers and healthy ways of living can help ease the challenging times.

— Keith Elias -Shetland Counseling, LLC, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Parsippany, NJ
 

The goal of psychodynamic therapy is to assist clients understand how past events in their childhood are affecting their adult lives, by shaping their personality. Through the therapy process I expose clients to different aspects of their lives, especially how they attract/interact with others, and how this impacts and generates spikes of anxiety in their lives. Problems like depression, anxiety, anger and social isolation can all be successfully treated and improved using psychodynamic therapy.

— Filippo M. Forni, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Graduating from a psychodynamic program at Northwestern University, I have learned the ins and outs of how to counsel from a psychodynamic perspective. I am well acquainted with all the aspects of identity and how these, along with unconscious desires, come together to form who we are and how we interact with the world around us. We will use this information, along with other tools and techniques, to move forward making the necessary changes to live the life you desire.

— Andrea Rose, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Austin, TX
 

My goal as a therapist is to help make conscious that which is unconscious for you, the patient.

— Sam Naimi, Associate Clinical Social Worker in West Hollywood, CA

I have extensive training in the theories of analytical psychology; I draw from the work of CG Jung as well as the post Jungian. I also combine my interest in wholistic theories that interweave mind and body.

— Dominique Yarritu, Marriage & Family Therapist in San Jose, CA
 

This basically just means talking and digging into stuff while we're talking. It works great!

— Matt Anderson, Licensed Professional Counselor in Edmond, OK

Psychodynamic therapy is a therapeutic treatment that primarily focuses on the interpretation of mental and emotional processes. It shares much in common with psychoanalysis and is often considered a simpler, less time consuming alternative. Psychodynamic therapy seeks to reveal the unconscious content of a client's psyche in an effort to alleviate psychic tension.

— Colby Schneider, Marriage and Family Therapist Associate in Portland, OR
 

My approach with Psychodynamic therapy is to help each client to self-reflect and self-examine the use of the relationship between therapist and patient as a window into problematic relationship patterns in the patient's life. It providers an insider perspective and knowledge to better understand the clients relationships with friends, family members and significant others.

— Shawdi Spencer, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Sherman Oaks, CA

Modern Psychodynamic Therapy gets a bad rep but I learned the importance and grace of this type of therapy from a past Supervisor. I use Psychodynamic tenets with clients often, specifically the strength of the therapeutic relationship and how reflection on the past can help us heal for the future.

— Jennifer Kulka, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in San Diego, CA
 

The psychodynamic model of therapy is the basis for all forms of psychotherapy and includes psychosocial development as well as allowing for the inclusion of other approaches.

— Jacqueline Burnett-Brown, Marriage & Family Therapist

During my graduate studies I immersed myself in coursework related to object relations. I value the theory and approaches refined by the intellectual descendants of Sigmund Freud. During my traineeship, I was supervised by a highly experienced clinician who considered her approach to be informed by object relations theory. I continue to pursue education through the Oregon Psychoanalytic Center.

— Andrew Conner, Registered Marriage and Family Therapist Intern in Portland, OR
 

I believe each of us is like an iceberg. Most of our psyche is hidden. I believe psychotherapy can help each of us see more of ourselves, and help us make more conscious choices.

— LAKink Shrink, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA