Psychodynamic Therapy

Psychodynamic therapy is a therapeutic treatment that primarily focuses on the interpretation of mental and emotional processes. It shares much in common with psychoanalysis and is often considered a simpler, less time consuming alternative. Like psychoanalysis, psychodynamic therapy seeks to reveal the unconscious content of a client's psyche in an effort to alleviate psychic tension. Psychodynamic therapy increases a client’s self-awareness and grows their understanding of the influence of the past on present behavior. It allows clients to examine unresolved conflicts and symptoms that arise from past experiences and explore how they are manifesting themselves in current behaviors, such as the need and desire to abuse substances. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s psychodynamic therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

 

The goal of psychodynamic therapy is to assist clients understand how past events in their childhood are affecting their adult lives, by shaping their personality. Through the therapy process I expose clients to different aspects of their lives, especially how they attract/interact with others, and how this impacts and generates spikes of anxiety in their lives. Problems like depression, anxiety, anger and social isolation can all be successfully treated and improved using psychodynamic therapy.

— Filippo M. Forni, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

I work through a psychodynamic lens, which for me means that we consider the unconscious and work to make it more conscious, allowing us more choices in how we operate.

— Eleanor Wohlfeiler, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

I have received extensive training in psychoanalytically-informed therapies. I find that my work falls within the contemporary relational practice of psychodynamic practice. In honoring the sociopolitical context, as well as the intersubjective space we share, I believe the therapeutic frame of this practice can provide wide benefit for those who seek self-awareness, growth and healing.

— Shelby Ortega, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist in Salem, MA

I was trained in psychodynamic psychotherapy at the University of Chicago. Psychodynamic therapy, combined with other approaches, such as energy therapy techniques can be very effective in treating a number of conditions. That said, I don't get stuck on one or two approaches. That would be like a medical doctor who only prescibes penicillin. A good therapist needs a lot of tools in his or her toolbox.

— Stephen Finstein, Therapist in Dallas, TX
 

Psychodynamic therapy is a type of therapy that looks for patterns that aren't serving you well. We'll look for patterns in your relationships, patterns within your family, and even patterns during therapy which can give us insight about what's happening. I recently completed a postgraduate fellowship at the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute (the largest psychoanalytic institute in the US) to better understand the complicated dynamics that inform all our lives.

— Jon Reeves, Clinical Psychologist in Seattle, WA

I have an attachment-based way of working. This means that I believe that most of the unhelpful patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving that we have, began when we were very young. We developed these ways of being in order to cope with whatever we perceived as difficult in our young lives, and it worked! But now we are adults and the old ways have kept us stuck in our relationships and our feelings. We work in therapy to unpack those old ideas and feelings, and find ways to change them so that they work for you in your life the way it is today.

— Amy McManus, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Marina del Rey, CA
 

I offer a short-term, evidence-based, and contemporary form of psychoanalysis called intensive psychodynamic therapy, which has been found effective in helping people improve their relationships, learn to cope with difficult feelings, and manage their anxiety. I also deliver it in short-term (12-20 sessions) and longer term (>1 year) forms. A benefit for some people is that compared to CBT, this form of treatment does not require formal homework. Homework, however, can be added as an adjunct, and in some cases leads to a more effective treatment.

— Daniel Gaztambide, Psychologist in New York, NY

Throughout my formal graduate and internship training I received extensive training in psychodynamic psychotherapy, both in a long-term and short-term format. At my prior position as a staff psychologist at University of Iowa, I specialized in providing psychodynamically-oriented supervision to practicum students and psychology interns, as well as both brief and long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy.

— Adam Hinshaw, Psychologist in Dallas, TX
 

In 2011, I completed a year-long certificate program in Psychodynamic Therapy at the Newport Psychoanalytic Institute. I have continued to enhance my practice with continuing education that centers psychoanalytic principles.

— Jennifer Collins, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Pasadena, CA

I want to help you explore where your thoughts and behaviors come from so that we can work towards healing the ones that come from a wounded place. We learn many dysfunctional patterns (of thinking and behaving) to protect ourselves throughout our lives, but sometimes these protective measures cause us more harm than good. I want to help you sort through the protective measures to see which ones you want to hold on to and which ones you need to throw out.

— Tivoli Hendricks, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Lexington, KY

This form of psychotherapy is an in-depth form of talk therapy based on theories and principles of psychoanalysis. With the help of a therapist the patient is encouraged to speak freely about current issues, fears, desires, dreams and so on. The goal of treatment is to experience a remission of symptoms, increased self-esteem, acknowledgement of one’s abilities and an improved capacity for developing and maintaining more satisfying relationships.

— Jess Perez, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in West Hollywood, CA

My personal therapy has been psychodynamic and I have practiced in this way for over 25 years. I believe the therapeutic relationship is the catalyst for change and is a container for other relationships to flourish and grow.

— Lisa Knudson, Counselor in Asheville, NC
 

I was trained in psychodynamic psychotherapy at the University of Chicago. Psychodynamic therapy, combined with other approaches, such as energy therapy techniques can be very effective in treating a number of conditions. That said, I don't get stuck on one or two approaches. That would be like a medical doctor who only prescibes penicillin. A good therapist needs a lot of tools in his or her toolbox.

— Stephen Finstein, Therapist in Dallas, TX

Although people bring in outside problems to me, my training has shown me that what happens between us plays out in the rest of your life. How we are with each other can give you the tools to take with you into the world in order to respond to yourself and others in a deep and meaningful way. I see therapy as a collaboration and mutual education.

— Gilbert Bliss, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Towson, MD
 

Psychodynamic therapy can help you to put the pieces of your life—like a jigsaw puzzle—together. We work to help you to lead a more purposeful life in which you are more aware of why you make the choices you do and how to move forward with more confidence. We cannot change the past but we can make more sense of it. We may live our lives with more meaning and more embodied presence. You may better understand what brought you to this point in your life and live life making more conscious choices.

— Alexandra Burg, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Cleveland Heights, OH

Often lasting and meaningful change comes with understanding how current and past relationships create our sense of self. Sometimes understanding is not enough, though, and we also need to metabolize past hurts and wounds. In therapy sessions, I closely attune myself to what you are thinking and feeling in the moment and look for subtle themes and gently bring them to our awareness so we can explore them together.

— Ross Farr, Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

Each person on staff receives training in psychodynamic psychotherapy throughout the entire time they are here inclusive of continuing education. Supervisor is a certified psychoanalyst that has completed a 4 year program in psychoanalysis.

— NYC AFFIRMATIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY, Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY