Psychodynamic Therapy

Psychodynamic therapy is a therapeutic treatment that primarily focuses on the interpretation of mental and emotional processes. It shares much in common with psychoanalysis and is often considered a simpler, less time consuming alternative. Like psychoanalysis, psychodynamic therapy seeks to reveal the unconscious content of a client's psyche in an effort to alleviate psychic tension. Psychodynamic therapy increases a client’s self-awareness and grows their understanding of the influence of the past on present behavior. It allows clients to examine unresolved conflicts and symptoms that arise from past experiences and explore how they are manifesting themselves in current behaviors, such as the need and desire to abuse substances. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s psychodynamic therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

I enjoy incorporating "talk" therapy and psychodynamic therapy because I understand that where we came from shapes who we are and how we see our environment. It's important for the therapeutic process because it helps me gain more access into who the client is.

— Samira Soroory, Counselor in Irvine, CA
 

The goal of psychodynamic therapy is to assist clients understand how past events in their childhood are affecting their adult lives, by shaping their personality. Through the therapy process I expose clients to different aspects of their lives, especially how they attract/interact with others, and how this impacts and generates spikes of anxiety in their lives. Problems like depression, anxiety, anger and social isolation can all be successfully treated and improved using psychodynamic therapy.

— Filippo M. Forni, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Through extensive studies in process oriented therapies including Erikson and Art Therapy founded in part in Jungian psychology, I have studied and attended training on Psychodynamic approaches to healing and discovery. Exploring emotions, thoughts, early life experiences and beliefs which contribute to how we see the word today and react to it and the people in it, allows us the opportunity to change our patterns. Training on defense mechanisms and empowerment also help transform world views.

— Heather Tietjen-Mooney, Psychotherapist in Milford, OH
 

All of us are shaped by our early relationships and experiences. Most people come to therapy to make changes in their everyday life. I bridge the gap by focusing on the goals at hand while making connections to lifelong relational patterns.

— Mackenzie Sodestrom, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

My training was in intensive psychodynamic psychotherapy, and I consider this experience to have given me the foundation for my theoretical approach. The theories I read and learned have helped to shape my thinking. Many of the workshops, conferences, and more advanced training I have taken have their basis in psychodynamic therapy. My clients come to me with presenting problems that can be related to issues from their childhood. I help them explore these painful patterns, and find resol

— Patricia Field, Clinical Psychologist in Los Angeles, CA

Psychodynamic therapy is a framework of viewing psychic distress as a function of unresolved trauma/conflict in one's childhood. it is an invaluable perspective in my toolbelt to help conceptualize attachment, response and the reality of others'. This is a treatment modality largely informed by my own experience of psychoanalysis for the past 3+ years.

— Christopher Roque, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in brooklyn, NY
 

As clinical fellow at Ann Martin Center for two years, I was immersed in an environment that focused on psychodynamically based treatment of children, adolescents, young adults, and parents. This approach was emphasized in supervision and in an intensive series of seminars.

— Jennifer Trinkle, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

I draw from a variety of psychodynamic schools and principles. Together, we will explore and process what is deeply affecting, undermining, or otherwise blocking you. Whether we like it or not, an understanding of our past family of origin DOES play a role in who we are. As insights are gained, you can look to consciously deal with certain destructive or dysfunctional patterns. I look to help you put new systems in place (better than goals) that will help you manage your life.

— Sandy Marsh, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

I am trained at the MN Psychoanalytic Society and Institute.

— Kaycie Dale, Counselor in Edina, MN

My foundation of therapy training is psychodynamic and attachment based. I can work with CBT and other tools, but I prefer to help clients gain a deep understanding of the mechanism of their own ego and psyche. I teach clients about the impact of unconscious and preconscious aspects of the mind, ego defenses and insight into the workings of their own ego which is based on "want/don't want", or as the Buddhists might put it "desire and aversion". Ego strength is foundational in healing trauma.

— Susan Pease Banitt, Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR
 

Once symptoms have become more manageable, I find it helpful to try to figure out what the underlying causes may be. While there may be a stereotype of what psychodynamic work might look like, I see it as an opportunity to identify how early life informs our present life in a realistic, useful way.

— Carol Schwerha, Clinical Psychologist in Hinsdale, IL

All western therapists are trained in psychodynamic therapy, looking at how early history affects our current life, including protective patterns, called defense mechanisms to cope with early woundings. To help find the root of these patterns and heal, we access the unconscious. I use dreams, symbols and metaphor to help you access the aspects of yourself that were wounded, find out what those parts need to heal, and use those insights to help you create changes in your life and in the world.

— Renee Beck, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in ,

Throughout my formal graduate and internship training I received extensive training in psychodynamic psychotherapy, both in a long-term and short-term format. At my prior position as a staff psychologist at University of Iowa, I specialized in providing psychodynamically-oriented supervision to practicum students and psychology interns, as well as both brief and long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy.

— Adam Hinshaw, Psychologist in Dallas, TX
 

Psychodynamic therapy is the best therapy for lasting change. In fact, a study by (Leichsenring et al., 2004, p. 1213), showed that people treated with psychodynamic therapy were “better off with regard to their target problems than 92% of the patients before therapy”.

— George Joseph, Therapist in Neptune Beach, FL

I work through a psychodynamic lens, which for me means that we consider the unconscious and work to make it more conscious, allowing us more choices in how we operate.

— Eleanor Wohlfeiler, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

The word psychodynamic can be broken down: psycho- from psyche-, or soul, and dynamic, ever-changing. Psychodynamic therapy trusts that we are all developing works of art, never finished, and functions on a deep level to help you to know and love new or exiled parts of yourself, so that you are empowered to make choices about the decisions and circumstances that arise in your life.

— Katy Bullick, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

Throughout my training, I was drawn toward Pychodynamic Therapy which looks at the unconscious as a vehicle to understand what is happening in one's conscious life. By examining one's honest, unfiltered, and sometimes raw responses to situations that were once unconscious, their ways of relating can be made conscious. By taking a gentle approach to looking at how unconscious ways of relating may be pushing others away, I then help others to figure out what may better serve them.

— Lani Chin, Clinical Psychologist in Monterey, CA
 

Psychodynamic therapy is focused on understanding longstanding patterns of thoughts and behaviors that interfere in meeting our goals and having good relationships. I have completed advanced psychodynamic training at the University of Tennessee and Weill Cornell Medical Center, including objects relations therapy and transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP).

— Kerry Cannity, Psychologist in New York, NY

The goal of psychodynamic therapy is to assist clients understand how past events in their childhood are affecting their adult lives, by shaping their personality. Through the therapy process I expose clients to different aspects of their lives, especially how they attract/interact with others, and how this impacts and generates spikes of anxiety in their lives. Problems like depression, anxiety, anger and social isolation can all be successfully treated and improved using psychodynamic Therapy

— Filippo M. Forni, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

I have received extensive training in psychoanalytically-informed therapies. I find that my work falls within the contemporary relational practice of psychodynamic practice. In honoring the sociopolitical context, as well as the intersubjective space we share, I believe the therapeutic frame of this practice can provide wide benefit for those who seek self-awareness, growth and healing.

— Shelby Ortega, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist in Salem, MA