Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP)

AEDP was developed by Dr. Diana Fosha and borrows from many common therapeutic methods, including body-focused therapy, attachment theory, and neuroscience. The aim of AEDP is to help clients replace negative coping mechanisms by teaching them the positive skills they need to handle painful emotional traumas. Dr. Fosha’s approach is grounded in a creating a secure attachment relationship between the client and the therapist and the belief that the desire to heal and grow is wired-in to us as human beings. Think this approach may work for you? Contact one of TherapyDen’s AEDP specialists today to try it out.

Meet the specialists

AEDP is a relational, emotion-focused, experiential psychotherapy that can help you process emotions at a deep level in order to find relief and increase your sense of connection with yourself and others. We will help you identify what is *right* with you and the glimmers of transformance in your life that you may not even be aware of.

— Catherine (Katie) Fries, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Philadelphia, PA
 

We can't change the past, but we can change how we feel about the past. This form of treatment "makes neuroplasticity happen", meaning that we can actually use your brain to change your brain. AEDP safely works with emotional experiences in the here-and-now of the present moment from the understanding that we can heal and transform our life by leaning into our emotions instead of avoiding them.

— Matthew Braman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

A good add-on to CBT, AEDP helps to anchor one's thoughts and beliefs in the here and now and to help make room for new beliefs and thoughts as they arise.

— Genoa Hamiel, Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

We can't change the past, but we can change how we feel about the past. This form of treatment "makes neuroplasticity happen", meaning that we can actually use your brain to change your brain. AEDP safely works with emotional experiences in the here-and-now of the present moment from the understanding that we can heal and transform our life by leaning into our emotions instead of avoiding them.

— Matthew Braman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

We all have experienced trauma in our lives. Sometimes it's a big trauma and sometimes it's little traumas experienced over and over. We develop ways to cope with the difficult emotions and they help us survive at the time. The problem is that we outgrow the usefulness of these skills and the coping becomes stumbling blocks to experiencing emotions in healthy relationships. Together, we can identify these stumbling blocks, work to access emotions, and develop new healthy coping skills.

— Brad Warren, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Fort Worth, TX
 

I’m using AEDP, I utilize the therapeutic relationship to help clients create a safe environment to experience their emotions fully to reduce suffering.

— Allie Shivener, Licensed Professional Counselor in Franklin, TN

I’m using AEDP, I utilize the therapeutic relationship to help clients create a safe environment to experience their emotions fully to reduce suffering.

— Allie Shivener, Licensed Professional Counselor in Franklin, TN
 

My current passion is AEDP, which is a modality informed by attachment theory and neuroscience that harnesses the power of the therapeutic relationship to undo aloneness and create lasting transformation for clients.

— Carolyn Moore, Counselor in San Francisco, CA

A good add-on to CBT, AEDP helps to anchor one's thoughts and beliefs in the here and now and to help make room for new beliefs and thoughts as they arise.

— Genoa Hamiel, Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

AEDP just feels good! It is more of "a way of being with people" than other therapy approaches. It is experiential, humanistic, and relational.

— Camille Larsen, Counselor in Centennial, CO