Polyamorous and Open Relationships

Even though they both fall under the umbrella of consensual non-monogamy, polyamory and open relationships are two very different things. Polyamory means having multiple romantic relationships at the same time, with the knowledge and consent of everyone involved. An open relationship is a relationship where the parties are free to take new partners. Whatever form of non-monogamy you practice or are interested in exploring, you and your partner(s) will have to navigate things like boundaries, safe sex, and jealousy. If you are running into issues or roadblocks, seeing a qualified mental health professional provides a safe and supportive space to discuss your concerns and improve communication skills. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s polyamorous and open relationships experts today.

Meet the specialists

It's not easy finding safe spaces to address issues that come up around polyamory and CNM relationships in a monogamy-centric culture. We'll explore issues that are common within our community and the experiences of you and your partners around issues of communication, boundaries, navigating hard feelings, etc.

— Deanna Richards, Mental Health Counselor in NEW YORK, NY
 

Originally inspired by Dr. Ruth Westheimer, I knew I wanted to be a sex therapist someday. I just didn't know it was possible. After graduation I learned that I could specialize in sex therapy! So I did! As a graduate of U of M's Sexual Health Certificate Program, I welcome working with people in non-traditional relationships, whether they be open, poly, or "monogamish." I "get you" and honor your path!

— Paula Kirsch, Clinical Social Worker in Detroit, MI

I live and work in the open relationship community and I have the experience to help clients negotiate particular aspects of their communication and relationships or I can more simply be the therapist that is accepting of clients lifestyle.

— Joe Zarate-Sanderlin, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

I believe that love is love. I think our cultural tendency to default to the concepts of monogamy are mostly just that -- a cultural default. I have known personally and professionally the possibilities of relationships that are other-than-monogamous. I am familiar with the inherent challenges and respect every individual's right to choose all of their relationships. I also recognize -- very importantly in a conservative community such as where I practice -- both the impacts of extended family and community relationships and the crucial importance of discretion. As with all of my clients, professional confidentiality is adhered to with vigilance.

— Tracy Morris, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Spring, TX

Originally inspired by Dr. Ruth Westheimer, I knew I wanted to be a sex therapist someday. I just didn't know it was possible. After graduation I learned that I could specialize in sex therapy! So I did! As a graduate of U of M's Sexual Health Certificate Program, I welcome working with people in non-traditional relationships, whether they be open, poly, or "monogamish." I "get you" and honor your path!

— Paula Kirsch, Clinical Social Worker in Detroit, MI
 

Many therapists will try to tell you that monogamy is the only sustainable relationship model, even though one only needs to look at the statistics to know otherwise. There is no judgment in my office for relationship models that are different from the culture's only accepted model. I have personally lived a open relationship model since 1992.

— kaseja wilder, Counselor in Eugene, OR

Connection is what life is all about. When our important relationships aren't working, everything suffers. Yet, if you're in a relationship that is unconventional in some way, it can be that much harder to reach out for help, for fear your relationships will be criticized, or you'll be made to feel that you or your loved ones are the problem. Increasingly, people are discovering that non-monogamy can be a viable and sustainable way of being in relationship. Whether you are well versed in non-monogamy or just beginning to explore this option, I create space to explore what best fits your life and identity. I offer relationship therapy for non-monogamous individuals, couples and triads.

— Kathryn Stinson, Counselor in St. Louis, MO
 

All forms of consentual non-monogamy are welcome at TheraBee. I work with individuals who are, who want to, or who are curious about practicing ethical non-monogamy. I also offer relationship therapy - even if there are more than 2 people in the part of the polycule that want therapy!

— Andrea Bezaire, Psychologist in Ann Arbor, MI
 

I specialize in working with singles, couples, and groups who are exploring or approaching issues in alternative relationships and alternative family structures, including ethical non-monogamy, polyamory, kink, living single, co-parenting, and chosen family. I also bring extended knowledge about: * compersion (“the opposite of jealousy”) * coming out and living out in the context of SOGIE, alternative relationships, and chosen family * relationship shifts and transitions * interdependence in long-term romantic relationships Yes, all relationships shift and change; yet, love can regenerate again and again in the most mysterious moments and forms when we stay open and curious.

— Anna Hirsch, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Oaklnd, CA

Many clients wishing to attend therapy for two primary reasons. Either to being or open a current relationship they are in, or to manage their current open or Poly relationship.

— Marissa Talarico, Counselor in Vancovuer, WA
 

Originally inspired by Dr. Ruth Westheimer, I knew I wanted to be a sex therapist someday. I just didn't know it was possible. After graduation I learned that I could specialize in sex therapy! So I did! As a graduate of U of M's Sexual Health Certificate Program, I welcome working with people in non-traditional relationships, whether they be open, poly, or "monogamish." I "get you" and honor your path! No "side eye" from me!

— Paula Kirsch, Clinical Social Worker in Detroit, MI