Self-Esteem

The term self-esteem refers to our overall subjective emotional evaluation of our own worth – in other words, it’s your attitude towards yourself. Self-esteem begins to take shape in childhood and can be influenced by many factors, including early experiences at home or school, familial relationships, the media, your age and role in society and how people react to you. It is totally normal for your self-esteem to fluctuate – for example feeling down about yourself once in awhile. However, most individuals develop a baseline self-esteem that remains fairly constant over the course of their lifetimes. If you are struggling with low self-esteem, you likely spend significant time criticizing yourself and you may experience frequent feelings of shame and self-doubt. The good news is that, with work, you can change your baseline self-esteem. Therapy for self-esteem issues can help you work toward feeling confident, valuable, and worthy of respect. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s self-esteem experts today.

Meet the specialists

Learning how to love ourselves can be a difficult task, even in an era that popularizes the concepts of self-care and self-love. Self-love is more than a bath bomb and a good tub soak, though that's not a bad place to start. Often self-esteem issues root back to a defensive coping mechanism adopted early in life for protection, but ultimately harms us and keep us from living a full life. We will work together to build your confidence and make it safe to be vulnerable and love yourself.

— Jennifer Alt, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
 

To improve self-esteem, I will help you learn how to trust your gut and really pay attention to what is happening inside of you. Our intuition is often referred to as our “inner voice” most commonly known as a gut feeling. Body Psychotherapy & Embodied Spirituality utilize the body as a compass along with visualization and mindfulness, to create healthy boundaries in your relationships, so that you have space to manifest how you want to be in the world, and heal negative thinking patterns.

— Lina Návar, Psychotherapist in Austin, TX

To improve self-esteem, I will help you learn how to trust your gut and really pay attention to what is happening inside of you. Our intuition is often referred to as our “inner voice” most commonly known as a gut feeling. Body Psychotherapy & Embodied Spirituality utilize the body as a compass along with visualization and mindfulness, to create healthy boundaries in your relationships, so that you have space to manifest how you want to be in the world, and heal negative thinking patterns.

— Lina Návar, Psychotherapist in Austin, TX
 

The way you feel about yourself matters, and in a world that constantly showcases perfection, it is all too easy to want to hide who you really are. Developing a sense of who you are and learning how to honor that person starts with realizing that you are valuable and worthy of honor and respect. Through narrative theory, we can work together to explore who you are and empower you to be yourself more confidently.

— Jacob Santhouse, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Nampa, ID

Self-esteem can be a tricky issue to address. There are many things that can be affecting it. I am very proficient at working with clients to explore all possible reasons your self-esteem, self-worth or confidence feels low. If it's situational we will figure out how to move through it and if it's rooted in past experience we will bring it to the surface and learn how to leave it in the past.

— Jeff Guenther, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I have worked with many women and men who initially seek out counseling for anxiety, depression, relationship problems, and work issues--and often underlying these problems is a lack of trust in themselves, lots of negative self-talk, and unfinished healing from past family and relationship events. My hope is to create a safe environment to better understand what is happening and to then collaborate in implementing skills that will foster self-confidence, and self acceptance.

— Amanda Rebel, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO
 

My time working at a college counseling center allowed me to work with clients experiencing difficulties with self-esteem issues.

— Dr. Jonathan Rabbani, Psychologist in New York, NY

One of the most wonderful decisions we can make is to unconditionally accept ourselves, which is much more empowering than self-esteem. With unconditional self-acceptance, we will alleviate a tremendous amount of our emotional distress, as well as persistent unhelpful feelings of anxiety, depression, hurt, guilt, shame, embarrassment, jealousy, envy, and anger. By unconditionally accepting ourselves, we also develop more acceptance for others, as well as for adversities outside of our control.

— Jaclyn Hall, Registered Mental Health Counselor Intern in Tampa, FL
 

On the outside it seems like you have everything going for you, yet you find it hard to feel proud and confident of what you've done. The voice in your head keeps telling you you're not good enough, that you don't deserve where you are, and all the things wrong with you. It can be really easy to put yourself last, and feel guilty when you decide to be first. I want to help you build up your confidence and talk back to that inner voice so that you can see that you deserve better.

— Francesca Parker, Therapist

So many things are wrapped up in the view we have of ourselves - whose voice are you letting control that view? Your dad's? Society's? Maybe your grandmother's? You may not know at this point - and that is okay! Just know this - that self-critical or self-doubting voice is not yours - it is a voice that you have been listening to for so long that it appears to be yours. I help individual teens and adults identify their self-critical voices and learn a new language - positive self-talk.

— Sarah Shah, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Austin, TX
 

I believe that the relationship we have with ourselves sets the precedent for all our relationships. You may struggle to put yourself first - either because you have always been told to put others before you (common in many Eastern cultures) or because you don't think you deserve to be first. I am here to tell you that you are so important and in order to thrive in all parts of your life, you must prioritize yourself.

— Loveroop Bath, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Richland, WA

Self-esteem is a major area in which I have experience in working with. It's a topic that I believe is not discussed enough in regards to mental health. I believe that self-esteem is something that begins at birth and develops throughout a person's entire life, and counseling is a major source of support when it comes to improving your self-esteem! I have training in solution-focused techniques, and together we can begin improving your self-esteem.

— Amanda Roller, Registered Mental Health Counselor Intern in Fort Myers, FL
 

As a gay person, you may struggle with your self-worth. You might also suffer from anxiety or depression. You may have trouble sleeping, feel isolated socially, or exhausted from self-criticism. You’re tired of struggling. You want to work with a therapist to help you overcome your pain and angst.

— Adam Blum, Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

Imagine looking into the mirror attached to the visor in your car and thinking “this is gonna be great, I got this.” Your first time out with a group of friends in several months. Your cheeks hurt later in the evening from laughing and smiling. As you say goodbye and walk to your car at the end of the night you feel this warm feeling come over you. Our journey through self-exploration and self-discovery can help increase confidence and self-worth improving your relationships with friends/family.

— Tara Arhakos, Licensed Professional Counselor in Monmouth Beach, NJ
 

It may be hard to see one's own value, and our minds can trick us into denying our worth. I believe in your value, and I am happy to bring it out of you. There are specific techniques I use to help you create a more stable sense of your own self-worth, and distance people from their tricky minds that tell them otherwise. I am committed to working with you to make your average set-point of self-worth higher, so that you can have confidence in living the life that you value.

— Leon Tsao, Mental Health Counselor

When we feel low self-esteem it is usually because we are comparing ourselves negatively to others around us. These thoughts often have their roots in beliefs we have about ourself and our self worth that we learned in childhood. Our first step is to identify the thoughts and where they first came from, and then begin to challenge them.

— Stephen Grimes, Psychotherapist in New York, NY
 

I will teach you how to have the hard conversations, talking about topics you've never been able to talk about before so you can align your hopes and desires. What would it be like to be heard by your partner? What would it be like to know that they support you and care about you and love you? I can help you find your focus, center yourself and find peace. I can help you to dig deeper and achieve the goals you set to become a better you and have more connected relationships.

— Nikki Nolet, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Del Mar, CA

our overall sense of self-worth and value is vital to a positive life experience. Low self-esteem can negatively affect your life and manifest itself in many different ways. My goal is to assist you in feeling less critical of yourself by helping you to develop tools that increase your feelings of self-esteem and inner confidence.

— Krystal Marcinkiewicz, Licensed Professional Counselor in Beaverton, OR