Contemplative Therapy

Contemplative therapy borrows principles and philosophies from Buddhism and integrates them with more traditional clinical approaches. Contemplative therapy is founded on the belief that each individual has the power within themselves to heal their own pain. Contemplative therapy is often a good match for individuals seeking to increase self-awareness and improve well-being in a holistic way. Mindfulness techniques to root oneself in the present moment and achieve clarity are the hallmarks of this approach. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s contemplative therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

We work toward deep and transformative reflection together in sessions.

— Mike Doogan, Counselor in Portland, OR

Jodi is a graduate of Naropa's Contemplative Psychotherapy Graduate Program. Naropa University’s concentration in Contemplative Psychotherapy & Buddhist Psychology master's degree is a counseling program that grounds itself in the Buddhist contemplative wisdom tradition and includes current humanistic psychological approaches to give insight and skills to show up fully for one's self and others.

— Jodi Alieksaites, Licensed Professional Counselor in Boulder, CO
 

I use an eclectic approach that combines Mindfulness-Based CBT and other forms of cognitive therapy, such as ACT and DBT to help recognize negative cognitions and beliefs and incorporate skills to increase adaptive thinking and positive cognitions. Using mindfulness-based cognitive therapies to better understand thinking patterns and how we can change our brain in order to move out of autopilot into healthier and more adaptive practices.

— Cara Maksimow, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in chatham, NJ

I received my Masters in Psychology with a focus in Contemplative Psychotherapy. My program focused on how to encourage a deeper connection between the client and their mind. There is a large emphasis placed on the client's experience and this can be forwarded by this cultivation of one's awareness of how their mind works.

— Alejandro Rodriguez, Mental Health Counselor in Lake Mary, FL
 

Just as the breath calms the body, meditation calms the mind. Meditation has physical, emotional, mental and spiritual benefits. Elizabeth guides her clients in different styles of meditating to determine which form is most effective in giving them the deepest sense of wellbeing, maintain equanimity and handle difficult situations. Meditation has been proven to change the brain in ways that correlate with less stress and depression, less pain and anxiety, and a stronger immune system.

— Elizabeth Pankey-Warren, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Boca Raton, FL