Contemplative Therapy

Contemplative therapy borrows principles and philosophies from Buddhism and integrates them with more traditional clinical approaches. Contemplative therapy is founded on the belief that each individual has the power within themselves to heal their own pain. Contemplative therapy is often a good match for individuals seeking to increase self-awareness and improve well-being in a holistic way. Mindfulness techniques to root oneself in the present moment and achieve clarity are the hallmarks of this approach. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s contemplative therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

I have a meditation practice of nearly 30 years that helps inform my work with the reflection and mindfulness training in Contemplative Therapy.

— Susan Rooney, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

We work toward deep and transformative reflection together in sessions.

— Mike Doogan, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Contemplative psychotherapy integrates Eastern philosophies and practice with the clinical traditions of modern Western psychology. It is rooted in the belief that all people are granted the internal wisdom and spirit necessary to heal from pain. People seeking therapy to increase self-awareness, improve overall health, and promote a general sense of well-being may find contemplative therapy to be a beneficial approach.

— Susan Rooney, Counselor in Portland, OR

Just as the breath calms the body, meditation calms the mind. Meditation has physical, emotional, mental and spiritual benefits. Elizabeth guides her clients in different styles of meditating to determine which form is most effective in giving them the deepest sense of wellbeing, maintain equanimity and handle difficult situations. Meditation has been proven to change the brain in ways that correlate with less stress and depression, less pain and anxiety, and a stronger immune system.

— Elizabeth Pankey-Warren, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Boca Raton, FL