Art Therapy

Art therapy is a form of creative expressive used as therapy to improve a person’s physical, mental, and emotional well-being. Art therapists are typically trained in both therapy and art, making them uniquely qualified to use the arts for mental health healing. Art therapy helps clients express themselves and can be useful for everything from managing addictions to improving self-esteem. Art therapy is for everyone, but can particularly benefit children facing issues such as learning disabilities or behavioral disorders. Sound interesting? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s qualified art therapists today. No prior art experience or talent necessary!

Meet the specialists

Art therapy in an integrative treatment method that blends art-making, psychology, and the healing relationship of therapy. Provided by a Master’s-level clinician, art therapy provides meaningful benefits to youth and adults alike dealing with a wide range of challenges. One way to think about the use of art in therapy, is the fact that sometimes words fail us. It can be easier or make more sense to *show* who we are and what we are going through than it is to talk about these complex things. No ‘talent’ in making art is required —only an openness to explore and express yourself beyond verbal communication alone.

— Evan Honerkamp, Art Therapist in Denver, CO
 

I have been an art therapist for 22 years. I am a board certified art therapist (2001) in addition to being a Licensed Professional Counselor (2002).

— Jenn Abrams, Licensed Professional Counselor in Newport News, VA
 

Drawing as a release of emotions, trying new and other expressive forms of art to release pent up feelings

— Tenisa Montgomery, Counselor in Maitland, FL

Through the use of images that you create, Art therapy taps into the contents of your unconscious mind to help you identify strengths, limitation and obstacles, and can help you to develop insight and find solutions to improved self acceptance and self esteem.

— deborah green, Creative Art Therapist in Bayshore, NY
 

Through the use of images that you create, Art therapy taps into the contents of your unconscious mind to help you identify strengths, limitations and obstacles. Creative Arts Therapy can provide you with a language to express feelings that you have no words for. Examining and processing the images you create can help you to develop insight and find solutions. Creative self expression is a powerful way to access your 'authentic' self, and improve self acceptance and self esteem.

— deborah green, Creative Art Therapist in Bayshore, NY

I am a Registered Art Therapist trained in Boulder, Colorado from Naropa University back in 2000. Art in session could look like you using the art process to give you more insights about your process. Or it could look like you doing art in between sessions to lock in the work we are doing together. It also could just be putting on the creative lens to see your life slightly differently. We need to get creative sometimes to help big grief move.

— Beth Erlander, Licensed Professional Counselor in Boulder, CO
 

I have a masters degree in Art Therapy and Marriage Family Therapy. I am currently a board certified art therapist with the American Art Therapy Credentialing Board. I taught for over a decade at Notre Dame De Namur university in Art Therapy . I am currently the president of the South Texas Art Therapy Association.

— Deann Acton, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

I am a trained art therapist and adapted my in person practice to the world of teletherapy. We can resource your inherent creativity through any medium that suits you. Using art materials to express yourself adds both a layer of comfort and depth to therapy. Art materials are concrete. Life struggles are not. Pain feels hopeless and endless at times. Art making can empower is active. You do not have to be an artist to participate in art therapy. You just have to be human ;)

— Erika Bowser, Art Therapist
 

I am a trained and board certified art therapist. The process, not the product, is where we find the healing. Art Therapy is a powerful tool that can be used to understand things we do not always have words to make sense of.

— Natalie Coriell, Counselor in Shrewsbury, MO

I have completed my Master's degree in Art Therapy from Wayne State University and am near completion of the requirements to be an ATR- Art Therapist Registered.

— Alison Maples, Counselor in Royal Oak, MI
 

My journey through art as healing lead me to become an Art Therapist in 2004. I've found that the beauty in Art Therapy is self-expression, a felt sense, an experience that helps us process the deeper parts of self. It allows the subconscious to rise up, take form, and communicate. It gives us a voice when words cannot be found. Creativity gives us the ability to play, explore, and build confidence as we move through life and can significantly help those in search of healing.

— Sheilagh McGreal, Creative Art Therapist in Rochester,

Art therapy uses the universal language of art as a compliment to traditional talk therapy to help express and organize emotions that can be difficult to access. We emphasize affective engagement with the creative process over the production of a specific work of art, and offer a non-judgmental, supportive environment in which to talk and create.

— Sharon Itkoff Nacache, Creative Art Therapist in New York, NY
 

I have been practicing Art Therapy for over 14 years. In that time I’ve specialized with adults who have experienced trauma, anxiety, and depression in a variety of settings. Using art therapy to explore and identify feelings and thought patterns that help them find relief is an invaluable therapeutic tool.

— Marie Ragona, Creative Art Therapist in Astoria, NY

I interned for 2 years with an Arts therapist, and continued to work in her practice for my first year after graduation. Art allows us to access parts of our experience that may not have words, to come from our left brain experience, and to connect with our creative selves. These can be powerful tools in therapy.

— Jennifer Given-Helms, Counselor in Bellingham, WA

I am trained in art therapy and am a registered art therapist (ATR). I enjoy using art-making in and out of session as a tool to build insight with clients. I also use creativity tools such as journaling activities, using metaphors, and dreams to collaborate with clients reach their goals. I have used these techniques to treat a variety of issues including substance abuse, mood disorders and attention issues.

— Chauney Peck, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Art Therapy involves the use of creative counseling techniques such as drawing, painting, collage, coloring, or sculpting to help people express themselves through art and examining the emotions and story behind the art. With the guidance of an art therapist, clients can come to a better understanding of their feelings and behavior so they can resolve their deeper issues in counseling.

— Crysta Durrett, Counselor in Crescent City, CA

I received specialized training in Clinical Art Therapy at while receiving my masters at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. Additionally, I am a Registered Art Therapist are conferred by the Art Therapy Credentials Board (ATCB). I often use Art Therapy in conjunction with other evidenced-based treatments such as EMDR, IFS, or CBT both with children and adults.

— Martha Cowley, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Carmichael, CA
 

I have been a licensed creative arts therapist and a registered and board-certified art therapist for more than a decade after receiving my Masters Degree in Art Therapy at NYU. I've worked with all ages from infants to elders-- individually, in couples, families, and groups in a wide variety of settings and am able to use art making to open up hidden sources of strength, resilience and creativity in places of pain and suffering.

— Kelley Linhardt, Creative Art Therapist in New York, NY
 

Through the use of images that you create, Art therapy taps into the contents of your unconscious mind to help you identify strengths, limitations and obstacles. Creative Arts Therapy can provide you with a language to express feelings that you have no words for. Examining and processing the images you create and can help you to develop insight and find solutions. Creative self expression is a powerful way to access your 'authentic' self, and improve self acceptance and self esteem.

— deborah green, Creative Art Therapist in Bayshore, NY
 

Expression through art can open up the mind to lead you back to your heart.

— Marci Orr, Licensed Professional Counselor in Dallas, TX

I feel strongly that art is a way to speak without words. It's an alternative language that we each have access to however depending on our experiences (being promoted or discouraged, limited or supplied), this access may not have been cultivated. Often the introduction of art materials to a session yields a mixture of feelings, from anxiety to playful memories of childhood. In this way, art can become a place of exploration, where fostering an alternative way to see oneself is possible.

— Maggie Ritnour, Therapist in Brooklyn, NY
 

With a certification from The Creative Grief Studios, I incorporate expressive arts in my therapy if this is something clients desire.

— Karen Mittet, Counselor in Bellingham, WA

No experience necessary! Creative arts therapy comes in the form of art, music, movement, or drama therapy and people of all ages can benefit from any of the modalities. Each creative arts therapist is also a trained psychotherapist/talk therapist, so you will experience a combination of talking and creating depending on what you have come to therapy for and your comfort level. Not having to rely on words and having another way to express or explore challenges and experiences has great benefits.

— Emery Mikel, Therapist in New York, NY
 

Creativity is a window into ones inner world. Art making is an expression of ones feelings and thoughts captured in that moment in time. As an art therapist I use creativity to guide my clients into exploring their inner knowing. When making art the client has the space to explore and make meaning of their feelings and give voice to experiences that they are trying to work through, understand and process. Art making is a container for the emotions and a means to gain insight and understanding.

— Olivia Weber, Creative Art Therapist in New York, NY

I am a registered art therapist and I have a masters degree in Art Therapy and Creativity Development. Art Therapy is my main modality. I have a background as an artist and an arts educator as well.

— Tonia Herrero, Art Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

Art therapy means that you can express yourself in a graphic manner. Many times we say more with images than words. Even when we leave something in blank we are saying something that words cannot say. I encourage people to engage in some form of art because art let the unconscious to show up, in ways that talk therapy can't.

— Gioia Schuler, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA