Solution Focused Brief Therapy

Solution Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT) is a present and future-focused, goal-directed therapeutic approach that focuses, as the name suggests, on solutions. Instead of leading with the problems that brought clients to therapy in the first place, SFBT focuses on what clients want to achieve without exploring the history of the issue. SFBT is founded on the belief that clients know what they need to do to improve their lives and the approach provides coaching and questioning to help clients find the best solutions. Solution Focused Brief Therapy is used in the treatment of a variety of issues, including addiction, relationship problems, behavioral problems, abuse and depression. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s Solution Focused Brief Therapy experts today.

Need help finding the right therapist?
Find Your Match

Meet the specialists

Many client's benefit from short-term, solution focused therapy. I use a number of different techniques that have been effective for many client's dealing with anxiety, depression, and stress.

— Jason Thompson, Licensed Professional Counselor
 

I love helping people enhance their problem-solving skills & seek solutions! Stronger problem-solving skills lead to more effective strategies in overcoming stress & challenges. We explore options to resolve/ decrease the things we internalize as unpleasant. When we learn to “think outside the box”, We see life’s hardships as opportunities for growth. The impossible becomes possible! Any problem well-defined is half solved. I’m here to help you solve the other half & Krave Lyfe!

— Cassie Icenogle Konnoly, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Lacey, WA

Not all therapy needs to be long term. I can work with you to identify and accomplish short term achievable goals that will result in positive life change.

— Lorrie OBrien, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Enfield, CT
 

I have been incorporating a solution focused approach to my therapy since working as a family preservation worker in 2000. I have also use a solution focused genogram in helping individuals see some of the positive aspects of their family constellation. This is particularly helpful when looking for support or trying to find strategies that have been effective in the past in the individual's life.

— Gina/GinaMarie Dattilo, Psychologist in Exton, PA

Therapy is not forever. It is important to help people now (for the appropriate course of treatment needed). Asking questions to help with insight, helping to think about the future and any blocks we may have can be useful. Sometimes having a few new tools is enough to get you started and you may see more immediate changes.

— Monica Cagayat, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Bothell, WA
 

Solution-Focused Brief Therapy or SFBT focuses on finding solutions in the present time and exploring an individual's hope for the future to find quicker resolution to their problems. This method takes the approach that you know what you need to do to improve your own life and, with the appropriate counseling and questioning, you are capable of finding the best solutions for your future.

— Cheryl Perry, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Charlotte, NC

This is a great intervention that relies on what has worked for you in the past and how to apply it to your current situation. It relies on your strengths and an removing barriers to get the outcome you want.

— Emily Derouin, Psychologist in Denver, CO
 

Not all therapy needs to be long term. I can work with you to identify and accomplish short term achievable goals that will result in positive life change.

— Lorrie OBrien, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Enfield, CT

Used as a modality to examine current problems that may be in need of immediate intervention.

— Dorothy Smith, Counselor in Centreville, VA
 

SFBT helps the client identify an issue and together, with the therapist, work towards that goal.

— Ana Cristina Uribe, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

When we feel boxed in and we don't know where to turn, finding someone to talk to, focusing on a solution to the problem(s) at hand can be the best course of action. If you want someone on your side who has years of experience helping clients with different types of problems, reach out to me to see how we can work together.

— Dr. David Shoup, Psychologist in Pacifica, CA
 

I use a solutions-focused approach to help you identify your strengths and work toward your goals. I provide time each session to reflect on what was most helpful, and clarify what you want to work on between sessions.

— Camille Keith, Licensed Professional Counselor in Beaverton, OR

After working at a crisis stabilization mental health hospital for 5+ years I quickly adapted to providing effective therapy efficiently.

— Danielle Eaton, Counselor
 

A common complaint about therapy is its seemingly never ending emphasis on all that we are doing wrong. Enter Solution Focused Brief Therapy: an approach that focuses on all that you are doing right. SFBT helps patients identify and strengthen effective ways they are already coping, instead of trying to "fix" what is "wrong" about their lives. My patients have found SFBT incredibly effective, and I was lucky enough to train with a leading SFBT expert in the field.

— Saira Malhotra, Therapist in Denver, CO

Coming from a Solution-Focused Brief Therapy approach, instead of a problem-focus there is an aim to address what is currently going on and how you want your future to look. This helps define goals to strive towards for your journey onward.

— Leslie Faulkner, Counselor
 

Focusing not on the problem or how it may have developed, but focusing on new behaviors, problem-solving skills, and a mindset that moves one toward solutions and the changes they desire.

— Jerry Ochoa, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Turlock, CA

I have extensively studied and used Solution Focused Brief Therapy since 2006. I wrote my graduate dissertation on it. I firmly believe we have the internal skills and resources to truly thrive, we just need some help figuring them out.

— Sarah Bonilla, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Redlands, CA