Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are characterized by persistent food-related or eating behaviors that harm your health, emotions, or ability to function. They often involve an individual focusing too much on weight, body shape, and food. Most commonly, these take the form of anorexia, bulimia, or binge-eating. Anorexia involves excessively limiting calories and/or using other methods to lose weight (e.g. exercise, laxatives). People with anorexia often have an extreme fear of gaining weight and have an abnormally low body weight, along with a distorted perception of their weight or body shape. Bulimia involves periods of eating a large amount of food in a short time (bingeing), followed by attempting to rid oneself of the extra calories in an unhealthy way (such as forced vomiting). These behaviors are often accompanied by a sense of a total lack of control. Binge-eating disorder involves eating too much food, past the point of being full, at least once a week, and feeling a lack of control over this behavior. If you recognize any of these symptoms in yourself, a qualified professional therapist can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s eating disorder experts for help today.

Meet the specialists

 

I have been working with eating disorder for the past 6 years. I come from a person center framework that examines the need of the individual client rather than a formula. Eating Disorders come from many places, for many reasons and do not discriminate against, race, socioeconomic status, gender, sexuality or religious beliefs. Together we can work toward a life worth living where an eating disorder is no longer you safe places, your protection, your way of coping.

— Emily Reim Ifrach, Art Therapist in Watertown, CT
 

I have been working with eating disorder for the past 6 years. I come from a person center framework that examines the need of the individual client rather than a formula. Eating Disorders come from many places, for many reasons and do not discriminate against, race, socioeconomic status, gender, sexuality or religious beliefs. Together we can work toward a life worth living where an eating disorder is no longer you safe places, your protection, your way of coping.

— Emily Reim Ifrach, Art Therapist in Watertown, CT

I have 50 hours of training in Exposure and Response Therapy which is effective for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and other anxiety issues.

— Lynne Coon, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I have an extensive experience treating Eating Disorders. In the beginning of my career, I worked at the Eating Disorders treatment center along with the best professionals in the field. I understand and appreciate the power of the multidisciplinary team and will actively collaborate with other members of your team and/or provide additional referrals.

— Azhar Sultanova, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Portland, OR

I have been fortunate to have had wonderful first hand experiences working with people with eating disorders, in multiple settings. My experiences include working in inpatient and outpatient programs at Linden Oaks Hospital in Naperville, as well as in the group residential home, Arabella House, that was facilitated through Linden Oaks. I spent 7 years in these programs. Additionally, I have worked at The Renfrew Center and ERC Insight. My time now is devoted to private practice work.

— Dawn Leprich-Graves, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Chicago, IL
 

I recovered from Anorexia Nervosa (binge-purge type), Binge Eating Disorder, and Compulsive Eating. Having weighted as little as 79 lbs and as much as over 200 lbs, i personally understand what it takes to recover. I have worked with many children, teenagers, and adult women and men with eating disorders. Eating Disorders are the most deadly psychiatric illnesses of all. If you or someone you care about is suffering from an eating disorder. Please give me a call to discuss how I may be of assistance.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ

Imbuing food and eating with fear, morality, profit, and disconnection normalizes the spectrum of disordered eating. Fostering distrust in our bodies encourages regimenting, commodifying, objectifying, and problematizing our physical selves. Experiences of food and our bodies are tangible and visceral realities, as well as symbolic in meaning, and inextricably woven with our social locations. Beliefs in body, food, and fat justice, Health At Every Size, and body autonomy and acceptance guide me.

— Jessamyn Wesley, Licensed Professional Counselor in portland, OR
 

I have experience working with eating disorders at the outpatient, IOP, and PHP levels of care and I am well connected to community resources, so I can help you set up a treatment team and get the help you need. I'm a member of Central Texas Eating Disorder Specialists and the International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals. When working with eating disorders, I am conscientious not only of your relationship with food and your body, but also the way that your disordered eating impacts the support people in your life, your relationship with substances such as alcohol or pain meds, and your romantic relationships. I see clients with all sorts of unwanted food behaviors, including restriction, bingeing, purging, food avoidance, overexercise, and obsessively healthy choices.

— Tricia Mihal, Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX

Eating disorders involve extreme disturbances in eating behaviors—following rigid diets, bingeing on food in secret, throwing up after meals, obsessively counting calories. But eating disorders are more complicated than just unhealthy dietary habits. At their core, eating disorders involve distorted, self-critical attitudes about weight, food, and body image. It’s these negative thoughts and feelings that fuel the damaging behaviors.

— Kathy Hicks, Counselor in Whitehouse, TX

I love working with people who have emotional eating, body image, and/or disordered eating concerns and have done it since I started graduate school in the mid 1990's. I believe we all have our stuff when it comes to food but I also believe that these issues can effectively be challenged, managed or changed. I believe people can truly recover from an eating disorder and I love to be part of that process.

— Kelly Simonson, Psychologist in Athens, GA

Feeling out of control or terrified around food? Tired of ED consuming your life? Does your sense of worth need a boost? We have eating disorder specialists on staff who understand the pain and struggle of an eating disorder as well as effective treatment approaches. Because of the complex nature of eating disorders, treatment may involve working with a treatment team. We also offer a body image and eating disorder recovery group to complement the treatment process.

— Eddins Counseling Group, Counselor in Houston, TX

Working with eating disorders is a strong passion of mine. I believe recovery is possible and that together we can improve relationship with body, mind and food through a compassionate, team oriented exploration and examination of your relationship to food and your body. I believe we live in a society that teaches us our bodies are wrong and that there are good and bad foods. I believe this is NOT true. It is my mission to help people regain trust in their bodies, eat intuitively and challenge diet culture and disordered beliefs about food.

— Cayla Panitz, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

Eating Disorders are progressive illnesses. The sooner you intervene, the sooner you have your life back. I am certified to treat pediatric, adolescent, and adult eating disorders - anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder. We are HAES - Health at Every Size providers. From consultation to treatment, helping you or your child return to full living, is our only priority.

— Barbara Reese, Clinical Social Worker in Montclair, NJ
 

I recovered from Anorexia Nervosa (binge-purge type), Binge Eating Disorder, and Compulsive Eating. Having weighted as little as 79 lbs and as much as over 200 lbs, i personally understand what it takes to recover. I have worked with many children, teenagers, and adult women and men with eating disorders. Eating Disorders are the most deadly psychiatric illnesses of all. If you or someone you care about is suffering from an eating disorder. Please give me a call to discuss how I may be of assistance.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ
 

The cognitive behavioral model emphasizes the important role that both thoughts (cognitive) and actions (behavioral) can play in maintaining an eating disorder. Examples of maintaining factors include: Cognitive Factors-over-evaluation of weight and shape, negative body image, core beliefs about self-worth, negative self-evaluation, perfectionism Behavioral Factors- weight-control behaviors including dietary restraint, restriction, binge-eating, purging behaviors, self-harm, body checking and body avoidance Individuals with eating disorders often hold a negative or distorted view of themselves and their bodies. These thoughts can result in feelings of shame, anxiety or disgust that often trigger weight control behaviors and fuel a cycle of negative self-evaluation. CBT helps the client to examine which specific factors are maintaining their disorder and together you and I set personalized goals that are addressed throughout the various phases of CBT.

— Amy Castongia, Counselor in Huntersville, NC

I am a Certified Eating Disorder Specialist and on the governing board of the National Association for Males with Eating Disorders. I have undergone rigorous training to understand the underpinnings and co-occuring difficulties that accompany Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, ARFID, and other eating problems. I am currently under further certification by the Institute for Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders . I advocate nationally and have presented at international associations and local conferences about eating disorders in both Males and Females.

— Brian Pollack, Clinical Social Worker in SUMMIT, NJ

I have worked passionately throughout my professional career to help individuals heal from their eating disorders. I have extensive training in this area and have worked in the eating disorder field for over ten years, most notably as a Primary Therapist at the Monte Nido Treatment Center. I work collaboratively with patients' dietitians, physicians and psychiatrists to provide the most comprehensive treatment possible.

— Margie Slater, Clinical Psychologist in Encino, CA
 

I am a Certified Eating Disorder Professional (IAEDP). My volunteer advocacy work includes Secretary for The Alliance for Eating Disorders in Miami, Education Chair for IAEDP Miami and on the Board for National Association for Males with Eating Disorders. Eating disorders may include anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder, and dysfunctional eating and body image issues such as emotional and compulsive eating, orthorexia, compulsive exercise and body shame for females and males. Helping with co-occurring struggles with anxiety, depression, ADHD, SUD, trauma, emotional dysregulation and over control are also part of recovery. In most cases I will help the client customize a treatment team including medical doctor, ED trained dietitian and possibly a psychiatrist. Help transition to and from higher levels of care is also available making the client's physical safety a priority of treatment. Family therapy is also provided and encouraged.

— Lena Sheffield, Licensed Professional Counselor in Miami, FL

Helping those with disordered eating -- from emotional eating, to exercise obsession, to chronic dieting, to clinically diagnosed eating disorders -- is lifelong, deep work for me. I believe disordered eating behaviors are a way our deepest self asks, whispers, cries and begs for help, compassion, curiosity and care. Gently inviting the body into the process while also applying cognitive techniques helps us to comb through layers of richness, healing and possibility waiting to be discovered.

— Caroline Gebhardt, Associate Professional Counselor in Decatur, GA

I work primarily with bulimia and binge eating, from a Health at Every Size perspective. I am a certified Intuitive Eating Counselor as well

— Jessica Improta, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Santa Monica, CA
 

We would love to help you explore a relationship with your self or your body that may be manifesting itself through issues with food ranging from anorexia and ARFID to bulimia and binge eating disorder. Or maybe you are someone who consistently turns down social invitations because you feel worried about how you look. We can help.

— Meredith Riddick, Counselor in Ashburn, VA

Eating disorders involve extreme disturbances in eating behaviors—following rigid diets, bingeing on food in secret, throwing up after meals, obsessively counting calories. But eating disorders are more complicated than just unhealthy dietary habits. At their core, eating disorders involve distorted, self-critical attitudes about weight, food, and body image. It’s these negative thoughts and feelings that fuel the damaging behaviors.

— Kathy Hicks, Counselor in Whitehouse, TX
 

I have worked passionately throughout my professional career to help individuals heal from their eating disorders. I have extensive training in this area and have worked in the eating disorder field for over ten years.

— Margie Slater, Clinical Psychologist in Encino, CA

I know firsthand what it is like to engage in unhealthy behaviors. I also know about having unhealthy relationships with myself, food, the scale, body image and self-esteem. I noticed that no matter what weight I was, I was unhappy and unfulfilled. Recovery IS possible and while it takes work to sustain recovery, that too is possible. I am passionate about helping folks find recovery in the midst of their storm. Eating disorders are an outward expression of what is going on inside. They are the number one killer of mental illness. Eating disorders are complicated illnesses. There can be biological (genetics) and environmental or social triggers for the illness. Eating disorders can affect the individual not only physically but also emotionally, mentally and spiritually. I have worked in an eating disorder treatment facility, have volunteered time facilitating eating disorder support groups, am working toward becoming a CEDS (certified eating disorder specialist) and also have personal experience.

— Erica Faulhaber, Licensed Professional Counselor in Lakewood, CO
 

I recovered from Anorexia Nervosa (binge-purge type), Binge Eating Disorder, and Compulsive Eating. Having weighted as little as 79 lbs and as much as over 200 lbs, i personally understand what it takes to recover. I have worked with many children, teenagers, and adult women and men with eating disorders. Eating Disorders are the most deadly psychiatric illnesses of all. If you or someone you care about is suffering from an eating disorder. Please give me a call to discuss how I may be of assistance.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ

Food and the way you look is a source of frustration for you. You're constantly worrying about your body size/shape, how much and what you've eaten, and have resorted to restricting what you eat, binge eating, counting calories and/or purging. You feel like you've tried everything to get your disordered eating habits under control to no avail, and you're left with feelings of frustration, shame, and guilt over your behaviors. You're not alone! With counseling you can learn to gain back control.

— Mallorie Potaznick, Counselor in Coral Springs, FL
 

Working with eating disorders is a strong passion of mine. I believe recovery is possible and that together we can improve relationship with body, mind and food through a compassionate, team oriented exploration and examination of your relationships to food and your body. I believe the culture in this country has taught people that their bodies are wrong and that there are good/bad ways to eat and I help people find balance, become allies with their bodies and normalize their relationship to food.

— Cayla Panitz, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

I use exposure and response prevention therapy to treat OCD, anxiety and related disorders.

— Michelle Massi, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

My specialization in graduate school was on eating disorders and body image issues. I have worked at the Outpatient, Intensive Outpatient and Partial Hospitalization levels of care for both adolescents and adults as well as worked in community settings providing coaching, workshops and webinars on this issue.

— Kyira Wackett, Counselor in Milwaukie, OR