Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are characterized by persistent food-related or eating behaviors that harm your health, emotions, or ability to function. They often involve an individual focusing too much on weight, body shape, and food. Most commonly, these take the form of anorexia, bulimia, or binge-eating. Anorexia involves excessively limiting calories and/or using other methods to lose weight (e.g. exercise, laxatives). People with anorexia often have an extreme fear of gaining weight and have an abnormally low body weight, along with a distorted perception of their weight or body shape. Bulimia involves periods of eating a large amount of food in a short time (bingeing), followed by attempting to rid oneself of the extra calories in an unhealthy way (such as forced vomiting). These behaviors are often accompanied by a sense of a total lack of control. Binge-eating disorder involves eating too much food, past the point of being full, at least once a week, and feeling a lack of control over this behavior. If you recognize any of these symptoms in yourself, a qualified professional therapist can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s eating disorder experts for help today.

Meet the specialists

Eating disorders are among the most misunderstood diagnoses. At the same time, eating disorders can often lead to life-long symptoms and even deadly outcomes without effective treatment. I work with patients to understand the underlying issues of their eating disorder, develop healthier coping skills, and build a life worth living. In addition to a two year internship in an intensive outpatient program for eating disorders, I pursuing an international certification in this area.

— Stephanie Renny, Counselor in Cincinnati, OH
 

I have experience working in a residential treatment center for teens with eating disorders and have provided individual therapy for folks as part of an outpatient treatment team. I deeply believe that recovery is possible.

— Emily Pellegrino, Associate Clinical Social Worker in San Francisco, CA

I completed my masters internship working with clients with a variety of disordered eating patterns, most of whom also struggled with anxiety, depression, OCD, bi-polar disorder, substance abuse, and other issues.

— Lisa Hedden, Counselor in Tucker, GA
 

Most individuals that struggle with disordered eating face ambivalence in therapy, like gaining weight, eating "normal" food and purging. As a result, engaging clients to make a change is a big part of treatment. Managing anxiety is another one. For many, life has often revolved around managing their eating disorder, often creating an imbalance in other areas of life.

— Gwen Haagensen, Licensed Professional Counselor in Pewaukee and Delafield, WI

I am furthering my education on working with those challenged by eating and feeding concerns through online studies and have had experience treating this population in a clinical setting.

— Lucinda Wurtz, Counselor in Spokane, WA
 

I work with folks who want to be free from "diet culture". I work with Intuitive Eating, and Health at Every Size to help people build a stronger relationship with their bodies.

— Charis Stiles, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oakland, CA

I have training and experience treating all types of eating disorders and related issues. I have led community groups, inpatient groups, and provided individual, group, and family therapy at a residential treatment facility for adult women. I follow a Health at Every Size approach. I believe in full recovery from an eating disorder and work to discover the disorder’s roots unrelated to food and weight.

— Mackenzie Ayers, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Herndon, VA

Eating disorders involve extreme disturbances in eating behaviors—following rigid diets, bingeing on food in secret, throwing up after meals, obsessively counting calories. But eating disorders are more complicated than just unhealthy dietary habits. At their core, eating disorders involve distorted, self-critical attitudes about weight, food, and body image. It’s these negative thoughts and feelings that fuel the damaging behaviors.

— Kathy Hicks, Counselor in Whitehouse, TX
 

My specialization in graduate school was on eating disorders and body image issues. I have worked at the Outpatient, Intensive Outpatient and Partial Hospitalization levels of care for both adolescents and adults as well as worked in community settings providing coaching, workshops and webinars on this issue.

— Kyira Wackett, Counselor in Milwaukie, OR

I have several years working in an eating disorder treatment program. I have learned that it is not always about food. I can assist you in understanding the emotional functions behind your disordered eating as well as behavioral steps you can take to alter your experiences with food and body image.

— Ali Zandi, Clinical Psychologist in Seal Beach,

Working with eating disorders is a strong passion of mine. I believe recovery is possible and that together we can improve relationship with body, mind and food through a compassionate, team oriented exploration and examination of your relationship to food and your body. I believe we live in a society that teaches us our bodies are wrong and that there are good and bad foods. I believe this is NOT true. It is my mission to help people regain trust in their bodies, eat intuitively and challenge diet culture and disordered beliefs about food.

— Cayla Panitz, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I have worked passionately throughout my professional career to help individuals heal from their eating disorders. I have extensive training in this area and have worked in the eating disorder field for over ten years, most notably as a Primary Therapist at the Monte Nido Treatment Center. I work collaboratively with patients' dietitians, physicians and psychiatrists to provide the most comprehensive treatment possible.

— Margie Slater, Clinical Psychologist in Encino, CA

Working with eating disorders is a strong passion of mine. I believe recovery is possible and that together we can improve relationship with body, mind and food through a compassionate, team oriented exploration and examination of your relationships to food and your body. I believe the culture in this country has taught people that their bodies are wrong and that there are good/bad ways to eat and I help people find balance, become allies with their bodies and normalize their relationship to food.

— Cayla Panitz, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I have worked passionately throughout my professional career to help individuals heal from their eating disorders. I have extensive training in this area and have worked in the eating disorder field for over ten years.

— Margie Slater, Clinical Psychologist in Encino, CA
 

I completed my masters internship working with clients with a variety of disordered eating patterns and diagnoses (e.g. anorexia, bulimia, other specified eating disorder), most of whom also struggled with anxiety, depression, OCD, bi-polar disorder, substance abuse, and other issues.

— Lisa Hedden, Counselor in Tucker, GA
 

I have been fortunate to have had wonderful first hand experiences working with people with eating disorders, in multiple settings. My experiences include working in inpatient and outpatient programs at Linden Oaks Hospital in Naperville, as well as in the group residential home, Arabella House, that was facilitated through Linden Oaks. I spent 7 years in these programs. Additionally, I have worked at The Renfrew Center and ERC Insight. My time now is devoted to private practice work.

— Dawn Leprich-Graves, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Chicago, IL

I specialize in Eating Disorder Recovery using Intuitive Eating, Health at Every Size, and All Foods Fit principles. My clients primarily struggle with Binge Eating Disorder, but I also work with those appropriate for outpatient care with other disordered eating.

— Kristin Mock, Licensed Professional Counselor in Savannah, GA
 

Eating disorders are biologically based illnesses that affect individuals not only psychologically but also medically. They are composed of a combination of genetic, temperamental, environmental, social, behavioral and emotional factors. They are not a choice or a disorder of vanity. Eating disorders encompass a variety of symptoms including body image concerns, fears and phobias and high levels of anxiety and depression.

— Lissette Cortes, Psychologist in COCONUT CREEK, FL