Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are characterized by persistent food-related or eating behaviors that harm your health, emotions, or ability to function. They often involve an individual focusing too much on weight, body shape, and food. Most commonly, these take the form of anorexia, bulimia, or binge-eating. Anorexia involves excessively limiting calories and/or using other methods to lose weight (e.g. exercise, laxatives). People with anorexia often have an extreme fear of gaining weight and have an abnormally low body weight, along with a distorted perception of their weight or body shape. Bulimia involves periods of eating a large amount of food in a short time (bingeing), followed by attempting to rid oneself of the extra calories in an unhealthy way (such as forced vomiting). These behaviors are often accompanied by a sense of a total lack of control. Binge-eating disorder involves eating too much food, past the point of being full, at least once a week, and feeling a lack of control over this behavior. If you recognize any of these symptoms in yourself, a qualified professional therapist can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s eating disorder experts for help today.

Meet the specialists

Livia Freier, Ph.D., gained clinical experience in the treatment of severe and persistent eating disorders in the context of in- and outpatient treatment at ITA, Instituto de transtornos alimentarios, Barcelona, Spain. Eating disorders pose a great physical and psychological risk. If you are suffering from an eating disorder please contact us for help.

— Livia Freier, Counselor in Providence, RI
 

I am passionate about guiding others, including all genders, toward healing disordered eating and body image issues. I have extensive experience working w/ variations of Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Orthorexia, and Body Dysmorphia. And I often see clients' who commonly are on the edge, having disordered eating and body image issues.

— Stacy Ruse (Owner), Licensed Professional Counselor in Longmont, CO

I have been an eating disorder specialist for over 25 years. I became a therapist because of my own history of Anorexia and Bulimia and this gives me insider knowledge on what it takes to heal. I utilize a combination of DBT and Mindfulness to help clients understand unhealthy habit patterns and to break them for good! In 2013, I received the distinct honor of being names Social Worker of the Year in New Jersey for my dedication to helping clients in the field of eating disorders.

— Danna Markson, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in LIVINGSTON, NJ
 

Food and the way you look is a source of frustration for you. You're constantly worrying about your body size/shape, how much and what you've eaten, and have resorted to restricting what you eat, binge eating, counting calories and/or purging. You feel like you've tried everything to get your disordered eating habits under control to no avail, and you're left with feelings of frustration, shame, and guilt over your behaviors. You're not alone! With counseling you can learn to gain back control.

— Mallorie Potaznick, Counselor in Coral Springs, FL
 

My specialization in graduate school was on eating disorders and body image issues. I have worked at the Outpatient, Intensive Outpatient and Partial Hospitalization levels of care for both adolescents and adults as well as worked in community settings providing coaching, workshops and webinars on this issue.

— Kyira Wackett, Counselor in Milwaukie, OR

I shifted from work in Clinical Nutrition in the acute care setting to Psychotherapy when I knew I wanted to treat Eating Disorders. The miracle of recovery that I experienced in a relatively short time, inspired me to learn how that came to be. Anorexia, Bulimia, and Compulsive Overeating are issuer related to Anxiety, Depression, and Trauma; they result in medical issues related to nutrition- so this expertise is essential as well.

— christine loeb, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encino, CA
 

I completed my masters internship working with clients with a variety of disordered eating patterns, most of whom also struggled with anxiety, depression, OCD, bi-polar disorder, substance abuse, and other issues.

— Lisa Hedden, Counselor in Tucker, GA
 

I recovered from Anorexia Nervosa (binge-purge type), Binge Eating Disorder, and Compulsive Eating. Having weighted as little as 79 lbs and as much as over 200 lbs, i personally understand what it takes to recover. I have worked with many children, teenagers, and adult women and men with eating disorders. Eating Disorders are the most deadly psychiatric illnesses of all. If you or someone you care about is suffering from an eating disorder. Please give me a call to discuss how I may be of assistance.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ

Eating disorders involve extreme disturbances in eating behaviors—following rigid diets, bingeing on food in secret, throwing up after meals, obsessively counting calories. But eating disorders are more complicated than just unhealthy dietary habits. At their core, eating disorders involve distorted, self-critical attitudes about weight, food, and body image. It’s these negative thoughts and feelings that fuel the damaging behaviors.

— Kathy Hicks, Counselor in Whitehouse, TX
 

Imbuing food and eating with fear, morality, profit, and disconnection normalizes the spectrum of disordered eating. Fostering distrust in our bodies encourages regimenting, commodifying, objectifying, and problematizing our physical selves. Experiences of food and our bodies are tangible and visceral realities, as well as symbolic in meaning, and inextricably woven with our social locations. Beliefs in body, food, and fat justice, Health At Every Size, and body autonomy and acceptance guide me.

— Jessamyn Wesley, Licensed Professional Counselor in portland, OR
 

I have worked in Eating Disorder treatment centers (residential, IOP, PHP) as a therapist and counselor. I also take clients via private practice in downtown Tacoma. LGBTQ friendly. Pro trans. Pro family.

— Laurel Madson-Lawson, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Tacoma, WA

I love working with people who have emotional eating, body image, and/or disordered eating concerns and have done it since I started graduate school in the mid 1990's. I believe we all have our stuff when it comes to food but I also believe that these issues can effectively be challenged, managed or changed. I believe people can truly recover from an eating disorder and I love to be part of that process.

— Kelly Simonson, Psychologist in Athens, GA

I come from a Healthy at Every Size approach and encourage balanced eating vs any type of dieting or food restriction. I work with individuals to understand the role of the eating disorder in their life and help them work towards more sustainable coping methods.

— Rachael Lastoff, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Newport, KY

I follow the Health at Every Size (HAES) model and utilize intuitive eating tools to help people reconnect with their bodies and take care of themselves in whatever way is most life giving for them.

— Cassandra Walker, Counselor in ,

I recovered from Anorexia Nervosa (binge-purge type), Binge Eating Disorder, and Compulsive Eating. Having weighted as little as 79 lbs and as much as over 200 lbs, i personally understand what it takes to recover. I have worked with many children, teenagers, and adult women and men with eating disorders. Eating Disorders are the most deadly psychiatric illnesses of all. If you or someone you care about is suffering from an eating disorder. Please give me a call to discuss how I may be of assistance.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ

I have been fortunate to have had wonderful first hand experiences working with people with eating disorders, in multiple settings. My experiences include working in inpatient and outpatient programs at Linden Oaks Hospital in Naperville, as well as in the group residential home, Arabella House, that was facilitated through Linden Oaks. I spent 7 years in these programs. Additionally, I have worked at The Renfrew Center and ERC Insight. My time now is devoted to private practice work.

— Dawn Leprich-Graves, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Chicago, IL
 

Eating disorders involve extreme disturbances in eating behaviors—following rigid diets, bingeing on food in secret, throwing up after meals, obsessively counting calories. But eating disorders are more complicated than just unhealthy dietary habits. At their core, eating disorders involve distorted, self-critical attitudes about weight, food, and body image. It’s these negative thoughts and feelings that fuel the damaging behaviors.

— Kathy Hicks, Counselor in Whitehouse, TX

I specialize in Eating Disorder Recovery using Intuitive Eating, Health at Every Size, and All Foods Fit principles. My clients primarily struggle with Binge Eating Disorder, but I also work with those appropriate for outpatient care with other disordered eating.

— Kristin Mock, Licensed Professional Counselor in Savannah, GA
 

One of the many lies those battling an eating disorder believe is that they are alone. You are not alone. I work closely with several dietitians, doctors, and psychiatrists in the community. We will start with getting you wrapped around in support so you know, without a doubt, you don’t have to embark on this journey alone. Once you feel supported with a team, we will work together to develop concrete skills that help you regulate emotion, engage in your relationships, and tolerate the hard.

— Melinda Lericos, Counselor in Overland Park, KS

I have worked on multiple eating disorder treatment teams, as well as collaboratively developed a team at the university I previously worked at, coordinated a doctoral training experience with an emphasis on eating disorders, and run multiple therapy and support groups for individuals identifying as women, men, and all genders who are experiencing eating disorder symptoms. I currently coordinate the Fort Worth National Eating Disorders Association Walk and provide related trainings.

— Steffanie Grossman, Psychologist in Dallas, TX