Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are characterized by persistent food-related or eating behaviors that harm your health, emotions, or ability to function. They often involve an individual focusing too much on weight, body shape, and food. Most commonly, these take the form of anorexia, bulimia, or binge-eating. Anorexia involves excessively limiting calories and/or using other methods to lose weight (e.g. exercise, laxatives). People with anorexia often have an extreme fear of gaining weight and have an abnormally low body weight, along with a distorted perception of their weight or body shape. Bulimia involves periods of eating a large amount of food in a short time (bingeing), followed by attempting to rid oneself of the extra calories in an unhealthy way (such as forced vomiting). These behaviors are often accompanied by a sense of a total lack of control. Binge-eating disorder involves eating too much food, past the point of being full, at least once a week, and feeling a lack of control over this behavior. If you recognize any of these symptoms in yourself, a qualified professional therapist can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s eating disorder experts for help today.

Meet the specialists

 

I have been working with eating disorder for the past 6 years. I come from a person center framework that examines the need of the individual client rather than a formula. Eating Disorders come from many places, for many reasons and do not discriminate against, race, socioeconomic status, gender, sexuality or religious beliefs. Together we can work toward a life worth living where an eating disorder is no longer you safe places, your protection, your way of coping.

— Emily Reim Ifrach, Art Therapist in Watertown, CT

I am a Certified Eating Disorder Professional (IAEDP). My volunteer advocacy work includes Secretary for The Alliance for Eating Disorders in Miami, Education Chair for IAEDP Miami and on the Board for National Association for Males with Eating Disorders. Eating disorders may include anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder, and dysfunctional eating and body image issues such as emotional and compulsive eating, orthorexia, compulsive exercise and body shame for females and males. Helping with co-occurring struggles with anxiety, depression, ADHD, SUD, trauma, emotional dysregulation and over control are also part of recovery. In most cases I will help the client customize a treatment team including medical doctor, ED trained dietitian and possibly a psychiatrist. Help transition to and from higher levels of care is also available making the client's physical safety a priority of treatment. Family therapy is also provided and encouraged.

— Lena Sheffield, Licensed Professional Counselor in Miami, FL
 

I am passionate about guiding others, including all genders, toward healing disordered eating and body image issues. I have extensive experience working w/ variations of Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, Orthorexia, and Body Dysmorphia. And I often see clients' who commonly are on the edge, having disordered eating and body image issues.

— Stacy Ruse, Licensed Professional Counselor in Longmont, CO

I recovered from Anorexia Nervosa (binge-purge type), Binge Eating Disorder, and Compulsive Eating. Having weighted as little as 79 lbs and as much as over 200 lbs, i personally understand what it takes to recover. I have worked with many children, teenagers, and adult women and men with eating disorders. Eating Disorders are the most deadly psychiatric illnesses of all. If you or someone you care about is suffering from an eating disorder. Please give me a call to discuss how I may be of assistance.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ
 

I am a Certified Eating Disorder Specialist and on the governing board of the National Association for Males with Eating Disorders. I have undergone rigorous training to understand the underpinnings and co-occuring difficulties that accompany Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, ARFID, and other eating problems. I am currently under further certification by the Institute for Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders . I advocate nationally and have presented at international associations and local conferences about eating disorders in both Males and Females.

— Brian Pollack, Clinical Social Worker in SUMMIT, NJ

Working with eating disorders is a strong passion of mine. I believe recovery is possible and that together we can improve relationship with body, mind and food through a compassionate, team oriented exploration and examination of your relationship to food and your body. I believe we live in a society that teaches us our bodies are wrong and that there are good and bad foods. I believe this is NOT true. It is my mission to help people regain trust in their bodies, eat intuitively and challenge diet culture and disordered beliefs about food.

— Cayla Panitz, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I have been fortunate to have had wonderful first hand experiences working with people with eating disorders, in multiple settings. My experiences include working in inpatient and outpatient programs at Linden Oaks Hospital in Naperville, as well as in the group residential home, Arabella House, that was facilitated through Linden Oaks. I spent 7 years in these programs. Additionally, I have worked at The Renfrew Center and ERC Insight. My time now is devoted to private practice work.

— Dawn Leprich-Graves, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Chicago, IL

I completed my masters internship working with clients with a variety of disordered eating patterns, most of whom also struggled with anxiety, depression, OCD, bi-polar disorder, substance abuse, and other issues.

— Lisa Hedden, Counselor in Tucker, GA
 

Eating disorders involve extreme disturbances in eating behaviors—following rigid diets, bingeing on food in secret, throwing up after meals, obsessively counting calories. But eating disorders are more complicated than just unhealthy dietary habits. At their core, eating disorders involve distorted, self-critical attitudes about weight, food, and body image. It’s these negative thoughts and feelings that fuel the damaging behaviors.

— Kathy Hicks, Counselor in Whitehouse, TX

For the past five years I have worked in eating disorder treatment with individuals, adolescents, and families struggling with eating disorders and body image issues. I have worked at the out patient, Intensive Out Patient, Partial Hospitalization, and Residential levels of care. As a result, I consider myself to be a clinician who is able to work with clients where they are at, as well as support them in getting ready to transition to lower levels of care and back to being able to more fully participate in their lives.

— Ashley Ellis, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Working with eating disorders is a strong passion of mine. I believe recovery is possible and that together we can improve relationship with body, mind and food through a compassionate, team oriented exploration and examination of your relationships to food and your body. I believe the culture in this country has taught people that their bodies are wrong and that there are good/bad ways to eat and I help people find balance, become allies with their bodies and normalize their relationship to food.

— Cayla Panitz, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

I recovered from Anorexia Nervosa (binge-purge type), Binge Eating Disorder, and Compulsive Eating. Having weighted as little as 79 lbs and as much as over 200 lbs, i personally understand what it takes to recover. I have worked with many children, teenagers, and adult women and men with eating disorders. Eating Disorders are the most deadly psychiatric illnesses of all. If you or someone you care about is suffering from an eating disorder. Please give me a call to discuss how I may be of assistance.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ
 

I have an extensive experience treating Eating Disorders. In the beginning of my career, I worked at the Eating Disorders treatment center along with the best professionals in the field. I understand and appreciate the power of the multidisciplinary team and will actively collaborate with other members of your team and/or provide additional referrals.

— Azhar Sultanova, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Portland, OR
 

I completed my masters internship working with clients with a variety of disordered eating patterns, most of whom also struggled with anxiety, depression, OCD, bi-polar disorder, substance abuse, and other issues.

— Lisa Hedden, Counselor in Tucker, GA

I work primarily with bulimia and binge eating, from a Health at Every Size perspective. I am a certified Intuitive Eating Counselor as well

— Jessica Improta, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Santa Monica, CA
 

I recovered from Anorexia Nervosa (binge-purge type), Binge Eating Disorder, and Compulsive Eating. Having weighted as little as 79 lbs and as much as over 200 lbs, i personally understand what it takes to recover. I have worked with many children, teenagers, and adult women and men with eating disorders. Eating Disorders are the most deadly psychiatric illnesses of all. If you or someone you care about is suffering from an eating disorder. Please give me a call to discuss how I may be of assistance.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ
 

I have experience working with eating disorders at the outpatient, IOP, and PHP levels of care and I am well connected to community resources, so I can help you set up a treatment team and get the help you need. I'm a member of Central Texas Eating Disorder Specialists and the International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals. When working with eating disorders, I am conscientious not only of your relationship with food and your body, but also the way that your disordered eating impacts the support people in your life, your relationship with substances such as alcohol or pain meds, and your romantic relationships. I see clients with all sorts of unwanted food behaviors, including restriction, bingeing, purging, food avoidance, overexercise, and obsessively healthy choices.

— Tricia Mihal, Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX

Having worked with eating disorders sine 2013, I have found it helpful to have the trauma experience and training that I have. Many who have eating disorders have some underlying trauma that also needs to be addressed. Often working alongside an eating disorder dietician, I help get to the core issues under the food and body issues, as well as looking at the food and body issues that are problematic. I use an Intuitive Eating Approach, as well as Health at Every Size. I love working with those who have strained relationship with food, who may not yet meet the full qualifications of Eating Disorders. Let's address food and body concerns before they take on a life of their own. I am a member of IAEDP (International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals) and of ASDAH (Association of Size Diversity and Health).

— Jamie English, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Grand Prairie, TX

The cognitive behavioral model emphasizes the important role that both thoughts (cognitive) and actions (behavioral) can play in maintaining an eating disorder. Examples of maintaining factors include: Cognitive Factors-over-evaluation of weight and shape, negative body image, core beliefs about self-worth, negative self-evaluation, perfectionism Behavioral Factors- weight-control behaviors including dietary restraint, restriction, binge-eating, purging behaviors, self-harm, body checking and body avoidance Individuals with eating disorders often hold a negative or distorted view of themselves and their bodies. These thoughts can result in feelings of shame, anxiety or disgust that often trigger weight control behaviors and fuel a cycle of negative self-evaluation. CBT helps the client to examine which specific factors are maintaining their disorder and together you and I set personalized goals that are addressed throughout the various phases of CBT.

— Amy Castongia, Counselor in Huntersville, NC
 

I know firsthand what it is like to engage in unhealthy behaviors. I also know about having unhealthy relationships with myself, food, the scale, body image and self-esteem. I noticed that no matter what weight I was, I was unhappy and unfulfilled. Recovery IS possible and while it takes work to sustain recovery, that too is possible. I am passionate about helping folks find recovery in the midst of their storm. Eating disorders are an outward expression of what is going on inside. They are the number one killer of mental illness. Eating disorders are complicated illnesses. There can be biological (genetics) and environmental or social triggers for the illness. Eating disorders can affect the individual not only physically but also emotionally, mentally and spiritually. I have worked in an eating disorder treatment facility, have volunteered time facilitating eating disorder support groups, am working toward becoming a CEDS (certified eating disorder specialist) and also have personal experience.

— Erica Faulhaber, Licensed Professional Counselor in Lakewood, CO

Eating disorders involve extreme disturbances in eating behaviors—following rigid diets, bingeing on food in secret, throwing up after meals, obsessively counting calories. But eating disorders are more complicated than just unhealthy dietary habits. At their core, eating disorders involve distorted, self-critical attitudes about weight, food, and body image. It’s these negative thoughts and feelings that fuel the damaging behaviors.

— Kathy Hicks, Counselor in Whitehouse, TX
 

I use exposure and response prevention therapy to treat OCD, anxiety and related disorders.

— Michelle Massi, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

I have 50 hours of training in Exposure and Response Therapy which is effective for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and other anxiety issues.

— Lynne Coon, Counselor in Portland, OR

I have been working with eating disorder for the past 6 years. I come from a person center framework that examines the need of the individual client rather than a formula. Eating Disorders come from many places, for many reasons and do not discriminate against, race, socioeconomic status, gender, sexuality or religious beliefs. Together we can work toward a life worth living where an eating disorder is no longer you safe places, your protection, your way of coping.

— Emily Reim Ifrach, Art Therapist in Watertown, CT