Pregnancy and Postpartum

Like almost everything else in your life, your body and mind will face significant changes in the weeks and months before and after your baby's birth. While many women experience some mild mood changes during or after the birth of a child, 15 to 20% of women experience more significant symptoms of depression or anxiety. Symptoms, which may include feelings of sadness, hopelessness, or anger, trouble eating or sleeping, difficulty bonding with your baby, panic, upsetting thoughts, or a fear you may hurt yourself or your baby, can appear any time during pregnancy and during the first 12 months after childbirth. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, or even just a general sense of being “out of control” or “going crazy”, a qualified mental health professional can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s pregnancy and postpartum specialists today.

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Meet the specialists

I have specialized training in treating women with perinatal and postpartum mood and anxiety disorders. Additionally I am a trained Bringing Baby Home facilitator, a program that helps couples navigate the transition from being a couple to being a family. In my private practice I work with parents at all stages of parenting; from new born to adult children. I have found that each stage of parenting presents its own unique challenges and I have a soft place in my heart for parents and the struggles they go through as they guide their children through life.

— Gwendolyn Nelson-Terry, Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA
 

I have a certificate in Maternal Mental Health.

— Kimberly Hansley, Licensed Professional Counselor in Dallas, TX

Kimberly is certified in perinatal mental health; this encompasses the scope of mental health during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Depression, anxiety, OCD and other mood disorders can onset during the perinatal period, not to mention the transitions in the family. Kimberly is passionate about helping families conquer the mental health challenges and transitions that often occur during the perinatal period.

— Kimberly Hansley, Licensed Professional Counselor in Dallas, TX
 

I have several certifications and trainings in perinatal and postpartum mood issues, including the certificate training from Postpartum Support International. I have also trained with Karen Kleiman of the Postpartum Stress Center. My practice is also closely connected to Boston OBGYN, a leading group of physicians for women affiliated with Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital in Boston.

— Jessica Foley, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Waltham, MA

Therapy can be a place to figure out how to adjust to parenthood and how to cope with the pressures that come with this new role. It also provides you with a place to get support for what you are going through. I work with men and women who are struggling with this adjustment in a more mild form as well as men and women who are experiencing postpartum mood and anxiety disorders.

— Ginny Kington, Psychologist in Duluth, GA
 

Perinatal mental health can be a doozy for so many reasons, and it unfortunately still carries such a stigma with it. I believe in honesty, activating support systems, and setting every person up for success, whatever that may look like.

— Jenny Shully, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Napa, CA

I have a certificate in Perinatal Mental Health through Postpartum Support International.

— Amanda Leno, Licensed Professional Counselor in Gilbert, AZ
 

For several years I have had a particular interest in working with women struggling with infertility, miscarriage, pregnancy and postpartum anxiety and depression. I had difficult periods after each of my children and I find that my ability to relate and empathize can really help clients feel understood. Working on self-care, changes of identity and transitioning to new stages of life make this work very rewarding.

— Emilie Diesen, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Candler, NC

I have specialized training in maternal mental health through Postpartum Support International.

— Martine Jones, Psychologist in Asheville, NC
 

Specially trained in Perinatal Mental Health and Postpartum Adjustment Issues. Previously employed with the Postpartum Stress Center under the direction of Karen Kleiman. Advanced training from Postpartum Support International.

— Janel Morey-Sassano, Psychotherapist in O'Fallon, IL

Trying to add a child to your life doesn't always turn out the way you expected. Sometimes there are struggles with conception, pregnancy complications, or even birth and related challenges. This time in your life can be especially isolating and can increase the stress, grief, and sadness that you experience in your life. Through emotional support, we can help you feel less alone in your experience.

— Dr. Dowtin, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor
 

I have completed Basic & Advanced trainings through Postpartum Support International (PSI) that focus on Perinatal Mental Health. “Perinatal” refers to the period of trying to conceive, active pregnancy, and post-birth up to one year. I will soon be nationally certified via exam.

— Jessica Bertolino, Licensed Professional Counselor

Pregnancy and postpartum transitions, mood disorders, miscarriage, infertility, queer and trans fertility, body image, birth trauma, infant loss.

— ash luna, Clinical Social Worker in Evanston, IL
 

Dana Raphael defined the monumental physical, social and emotional changes of motherhood as matrescence. This period of time is perhaps more transformative and difficult than any other and women are often expected to float through all its changes as if it should come naturally. I would love to walk alongside you to help ease the fears, grieve the losses and celebrate the joys.

— LeAnn Meckley, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Durham, NC

I have completed training with Postpartum Support International to treat perinatal mood disorders. My treatment style is strengths focused, relationship centered and action based. This means we will first focus on helping you feel safe and understood in therapy, finding ways to engage your support system to support you in ways that actually feel helpful and focusing on specific things you can do with your thoughts and behaviors to feel better.

— Kylee Nelson, Counselor in Tulsa, OK
 

I have worked with pregnant women since 2001 and had participated in many trainings relate to Maternal Mental Health. I got the Postpartum Depression training with Postpartum Support International and the Advance Clinical training with Karen Kleiman at the Postpartum Stress Center in Pennsylvania. I belong to the board of directors of Postpartum Support International, Florida chapter.

— Ana Romero, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in MIRAMAR, FL, FL

In pregnancy and the postpartum period a multitude of different feelings and experiences arise due to the unique process. Some can be expected, and match norms popularized by dominant media, and others can feel foreign, “not right”, or cause grief and shame because they do not match the popularized norms. This life changing experience forces you to reform your identity, whether it be your 1st pregnancy or 5th. I can hold the feelings that arise and help you become the caregiver you hope to be.

— Jennifer Alt, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
 

Being pregnant and having a child is a big life transition that many women don't share the normal "downs" of these experiences. feeling blue, having body issues, having an existential crisis, questioning if you are a "good" parent," feeling guilt, returning to work and all that that entails and so much more. While a fulfilling role to many, we all experience some feeling associated with these.

— Maria Burch, Counselor in San Francisco, CA

Becoming a mother brings many challenges both physically and emotionally for women. I am a certified perinatal specialist from Postpartum Support International, and have trained extensively at the Postpartum Stress Center. I am also affiliated with Boston OBGYN for women in the Boston & Metro West area. Don't wait to get help, if you are wondering if you have postpartum mood issues, please reach out.

— Jessica Foley, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Waltham, MA
 

Specially trained in Perinatal Mental Health and Postpartum Adjustment Issues. Previously employed with the Postpartum Stress Center under the direction of Karen Kleiman. Advanced training from Postpartum Support International. -Experience leading and supervising teams of clinicians in the topic of Perinatal Mental Health. -Provide clinical supervision and direction to new clinicians seeking to be trained in maternal mental health -Develop and lead groups and workshops to new moms

— Janel Morey-Sassano, Psychotherapist in O'Fallon, IL