Pregnancy and Postpartum

Like almost everything else in your life, your body and mind will face significant changes in the weeks and months before and after your baby's birth. While many women experience some mild mood changes during or after the birth of a child, 15 to 20% of women experience more significant symptoms of depression or anxiety. Symptoms, which may include feelings of sadness, hopelessness, or anger, trouble eating or sleeping, difficulty bonding with your baby, panic, upsetting thoughts, or a fear you may hurt yourself or your baby, can appear any time during pregnancy and during the first 12 months after childbirth. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, or even just a general sense of being “out of control” or “going crazy”, a qualified mental health professional can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s pregnancy and postpartum specialists today.

Meet the specialists

 

While I am trained to effectively treat perinatal mood and anxiety disorders, including depression, anxiety, trauma and OCD, I always hope to reach women before symptoms get to that point. I am skilled at identifying and supporting women through common (and uncommon) challenges associated with pregnancy, adoption and postpartum health. It is now recommended that women who are high risk for anxiety/depression seek out support as early as possible, even before becoming pregnant/adopting.

— Felicity Colangelo, Clinical Social Worker in Portland, ME

One in five moms experience anxiety, depression, OCD, or other mental health problem around their pregnancy, and every mom experiences an adjustment period. Today, there are more demands on moms than ever, yet less fewer friends, sisters, and grandparents close by to help. Moms also find their relationships change with a new baby. Therapy's a place for moms to be real about their struggles, without judgment. I equip moms where needed & empower them to trust they have what it takes to be a mom.

— Dana Frederick, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Marietta, GA

The transition to parenthood can be an exciting time with many new changes. But, it can also bring feelings of overwhelm, vulnerability and sadness. My aim is to support you during this time using evidence-based approaches that help process your unique experiences or challenges. Together, we will co-create strategies to help manage your symptoms and get your emotional wellbeing back on track.

— Stevie Atkins, Therapist in Toronto,
 

I have specialized training in treating women with perinatal and postpartum mood and anxiety disorders. Additionally I am a trained Bringing Baby Home facilitator, a program that helps couples navigate the transition from being a couple to being a family. In my private practice I work with parents at all stages of parenting; from new born to adult children. I have found that each stage of parenting presents its own unique challenges and I have a soft place in my heart for parents and the struggles they go through as they guide their children through life.

— Gwendolyn Nelson-Terry, Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

My passion is working with mothers at any stage in parenthood from preconception and beyond. I am certified in Perinatal Loss and completed training in Maternal Mental Health as I work towards my certification as a Perinatal Mental Health Provider. Current training, education, past experience in pregnancy support and adoptions, birth trauma and nearly 20 years of personal parenting experience help inform my practice as a maternal mental health provider.

— Amy Galaviz, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

I have a particular passion for providing support to individuals and couples through pregnancy, postpartum adjustment, and the changing roles and identities that come with creating a family. My training has included the Gottman Institute's Bringing Baby Home workshop, a research-based training program that focuses on the impact of children on the parents' relationship, and teaches strategies to help couples stay connected and strengthen their relationship during this time of transition.

— Susan LaCroix, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA
 

Becoming a mother brings many challenges both physically and emotionally for women. I am a certified perinatal specialist from Postpartum Support International, and have trained extensively at the Postpartum Stress Center. I am also affiliated with Boston OBGYN for women in the Boston & Metro West area. Don't wait to get help, if you are wondering if you have postpartum mood issues, please reach out.

— Jessica Foley, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Waltham, MA

Many women experience shifts in mood during and after pregnancy. Our work together will focus on normalizing what is happening, and support you in developing practical skills for taking care of yourself during this important season.

— Brittany Boney, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR
 

Please see my website for additional details. https://www.balancedmindpsych.com/women-and-maternal-health

— Audrey Atkinson, Clinical Psychologist in Davidson, NC

I partner with women during pregnany and in the postpartum period to provide education, medication management, therapy, and coaching during the perinatal period. I am certified in Perinatal Mental Health and treat women with postpartum depression, anxiety, OCD, and psychosis. I am one of the only provider's with expertise in postpartum psychosis. Intensive pregnancy-focused retreats for expectant families provide a foundation for care throughout the perinatal period.

— Michele Davidson, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner in Virginia Beach, VA

Even the most "uncomplicated" pregnancy can feel like anything but! You may be managing family stress; dealing with changes in your body; navigating and preparing for new dynamics with your partner; and experiencing fear, sadness, and anxiety (with or without those other more "socially acceptable" emotions like happiness and excitement). It's so important to connect with others during pregnancy, which is why I offer a weekly pregnancy support group designed to provide community and support.

— Frances Jones, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

Motherhood is transformative, but not necessarily in that "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" sort of way. If you do feel like the big beautiful butterfly at the back of the book, you probably don't need to be reading this profile. Here's the thing: having help with this transition is essential. I have been working with expectant and new mothers for the last four years in my practice and I am a big fan of Karen Kleiman's work. I am also called to serve women who have experienced reproductive trauma and loss through miscarriage, infertility, birth trauma, and genetic diagnosis and conditions that affect whether and how she is able to have children. https://labyrinthhealing.com/counseling-new-moms-austin

— Ann Stoneson, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX

Postpartum depression and anxiety do not discriminate - estimates show that at least 20% of women who give birth are affected. For too long there has been stigma about postpartum depression/anxiety. I endeavor to validate the experiences of individuals who have adverse experiences related to pregnancy, childbirth, and parenting.

— Sarah Bower Ho, MA, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I support moms who are experiencing perinatal mood and anxiety disorders as well as parents affected by pregnancy loss, stress, marital strain, parenting conflicts, divorce, trauma and grief. I work to help mothers move through their profound personal journeys, recognizing that this identity shift evokes questions around purpose, roles, values, relationships, and beliefs. I focus treatment on embracing, adapting, and redefining the self while learning how to move forward with confidence.

— Heather Douglas, Clinical Social Worker in Charlotte, NC

Beauty and the Beast Jekkyll & Hyde just a few examples of the perinatal period. The divineness of motherhood with love and joy and admiration of a new life PLUS the hormone mood shifts, worry of being a "good enough" caregiver, and unexplainable fears. Not to mention the pregnancy "nesting" period madness... the birth experience with the retriggering of past trauma... then the breaking of intergenerational traumas, abuse and neglect. Let me help... http://www.lizwalkertherapy.com/parentingourchildrenandourself

— Liz Walker, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

Pregnancy and motherhood is the most profound change a woman goes through. We all know how beautiful it CAN be… how fulfilling and transcendent. Yet what if it doesn’t feel that way? What if you have had a traumatic experience because of pregnancy loss or complications? Or what if it feels entirely overwhelming, or you are feeling sad, angry, even empty? Is there a place for you to authentically express these feelings, without judgement? I know how all-consuming motherhood can be and that it can trigger all sorts of self-doubt, old traumas/memories and most often, GUILT. You are not alone… I understand these experiences on a very personal, and professional level. I have studied and trained on early attachment as well as issues around PPMD. I can guide you through the intricacies of pregnancy and motherhood with compassion and skill so that we can work towards finding you peace, healing and confidence. Transformation is possible.

— Erin Robbins, Counselor in Maplewood, NJ
 

I have worked with pregnant women since 2001 and had participated in many trainings relate to Maternal Mental Health. I got the Postpartum Depression training with Postpartum Support International and the Advance Clinical training with Karen Kleiman at the Postpartum Stress Center in Pennsylvania. I belong to the board of directors of Postpartum Support International, Florida chapter.

— Ana Romero, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in MIRAMAR, FL, FL

A not so well-known fact is that postpartum depression is the most common complication of pregnancy. You may feel very much alone and lost in your new role as a mother, but the reality is that many new moms experience very intense emotions in the weeks and months after giving birth. You expected to be overjoyed as you brought your new baby home and instead you feel exhausted, overwhelmed and cannot seem to stop crying.

— Jennifer Perera, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Cranford, NJ
 

I LOVE working with pregnant and new mamas to set healthy expectations, identify postive coping strategies, and celebrate their accomplishments while creating a safe space to work out the rest. Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders is an umbrella term which includes Anxiety, Depression, Psychosis, Bipolar Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder during pregnancy or up to 1 year postpartum. Statistically, 1 in 5 women are diagnosed and less than half are treated.

— Tina Gutman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in West Bloomfield, MI
 

I have several certifications and trainings in perinatal and postpartum mood issues, including the certificate training from Postpartum Support International. I have also trained with Karen Kleiman of the Postpartum Stress Center. My practice is also closely connected to Boston OBGYN, a leading group of physicians for women affiliated with Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital in Boston.

— Jessica Foley, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Waltham, MA

I spent the first part of my career working exclusively with children, which included a large amount of caregiver support, and led me to seek more specialization to support new parents (partners included) during such a vulnerable life chapter. I am trained in Maternal Mental Health (including perinatal mood disorders) by Postpartum Support International, and have collaborative relationships with various members of the local birthing community (doulas, midwives, lactation consultants).

— Allison Staiger, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Metairie, LA
 

Pregnancy, birth, and parenthood can bring us face-to-face with intense emotions, utter exhaustion, and overwhelming demands and expectations. Isolation, frustration, frightening thoughts and self-doubt don’t have to be your new normal. With the right support, you can become the parent you want to be, reconnect with yourself and your community. I have completed specialized training in perinatal mental health, including a year-long clinical training group through Perinatal Support of Washington.

— Shannon Budelman, Counselor in Seattle, WA

When you are facing struggles getting pregnant, staying pregnant or managing the transition to early motherhood, you can absolutely benefit from the support of a therapist specialized in treating maternal mental health. As a new mother myself, I am extremely passionate about helping fellow moms (and dads) throughout the entire process. I hold a Certificate in Perinatal Mood Disorders from Postpartum Support International and stay up to date on the latest research and treatment recommendations.

— Margie Slater, Clinical Psychologist in Encino, CA
 

Pregnancy and new mama-hood is a miraculous, life changing experience. With this time comes confusion and transition, and sometimes some pretty bad feelings. You probably aren't talking about it and even if friends and family notice, they may just chock it up to "hormones" and tell you it'll get better. The truth is, if after a few weeks of giving birth mamas are still feeling "bad", it's simply not hormones. I help pregnant and new mamas deal with feelings of depression, anxiety and OCD.

— Elizabeth Schane, Counselor in Denver, CO

Beauty and the Beast Jekkyll & Hyde just a few examples of the perinatal period. The divineness of motherhood with love and joy and admiration of a new life PLUS the hormone mood shifts, worry of being a "good enough" caregiver, and unexplainable fears. Not to mention the pregnancy "nesting" period madness... the birth experience with the retriggering of past trauma... then the breaking of intergenerational traumas, abuse and neglect. Let me help... http://www.lizwalkertherapy.com/parentingourchildrenandourself

— Liz Walker, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

Ever since I have become a mother myself, I strive to help parents in their lifelong journey of parenthood. In our society there are a lot of pressures that make this journey more taxing on women’s mental health. Postpartum depression is the most widespread complication of pregnancy. The timely intervention will help resolve the issue faster and will leave you more time to enjoy the motherhood.

— Azhar Sultanova, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Portland, OR

I trained through Postpartum Support International (PSI) after personal experience with postpartum mood disorders. I am a mother of 3, 2 of which are identical twins. I have become a twin expert and focus my practice on supporting other moms of twins so they can learn to embrace the chaos and really enjoy their kids. I'm familiar with many struggles and hardships women go through from infertility, high risk pregnancy, traumatic births and adjusting to mamahood.

— Lindsey Lowrance, Counselor in Lakewood, CO

Specialties include: infertility, miscarriage, perinatal & postpartum depression/anxiety, attachment & past trauma impacting current parenting anxieties or difficulties, & supporting couples through the transition of becoming parents Certifications: Maternal Mental Health Certification Gottman Bringing Baby Home Educator Gottman Emotion Coach for Parents of children 3-15

— Linnea Logas, Counselor in Minneapolis, MN
 

After becoming interested in this area, I received training through Postpartum Support International, and am currently the Co-coordinator for the PSI-IL Chapter. I began working in the Perinatal Mood & Anxiety Program at Edward Hospital. I currently work as a therapist for the MOMS Line, a 24 hr hotline for moms. In my practice, I see women with fertility issues, & pregnant/ pp moms with depression, anxiety, OCD, and birth trauma.

— Dawn Leprich-Graves, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Chicago, IL
 

Pregnancy, childbirth, and parenting are upheld as beautiful experiences in our culture. Often, though, women struggle emotionally at each of these stages and do not feel empowered to seek support. Depression and anxiety can bring feelings of guilt, shame, and inadequacy, among others. We know that the most important intervention for you is judgment-free support. You may feel alone. Perhaps you can’t share your feelings with your partner, friends or family. Maybe you feel afraid.

— Rebecca Wade-Rancourt, Clinical Social Worker in New Milford, CT

Beauty and the Beast Jekkyll & Hyde Good Breast Bad Breast... just a few examples of the perinatal period. The divineness of motherhood with love and joy and admiration of a new life PLUS the hormone mood shifts, worry of being a "good enough" caregiver, and unexplainable fears. Not to mention the pregnancy "nesting" period madness... the birth experience with the retriggering of past trauma... then the breaking of intergenerational traumas, abuse and neglect. Let me help... http://www.lizwalkertherapy.com/parentingourchildrenandourself

— Liz Walker, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

Becoming a parent is one of the biggest changes you can go through. From fluctuating hormones, to body changes, to having another human completely depend upon you. While many expect this time to be joyous, the pregnancy and postpartum time period can also bring about mixed up feelings. It's okay to not feel okay during this time. I help new parents navigate all that comes with the pregnancy and postpartum time period. I was trained by the Seleni Institute in Maternal Mental Health in order to best serve new parents--especially those who may be dealing with a perinatal mood disorder, infertility, or pregnancy loss. I want to honor your story of parenthood--however it looks to you--and help you to find joy within it. Despite all the hardships of being a new parent, there IS joy to be found.

— Ilyse Kennedy, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

Pregnancy and new mama-hood is a miraculous, life changing experience. With this time comes confusion and transition, and sometimes some pretty bad feelings. You probably aren't talking about it and even if friends and family notice, they may just chock it up to "hormones" and tell you it'll get better. The truth is, if after a few weeks of giving birth mamas are still feeling "bad", it's simply not hormones. I help pregnant and new mamas deal with feelings of depression, anxiety and OCD.

— Elizabeth Schane, Counselor in Denver, CO

Pregnancy and new parenthood is an exciting time in a person's life. A person's identity shifts dramatically during this normative event, but the aftershocks can feel unmooring. I have specialized training in working with postpartum and pregnancy mental health issues. I was appointed by Maryland's Governor to serve on the Maternal Mental Health Task Force to look at ways that the state can better serve new parents.

— Julie Bindeman, Psychologist in Rockville, MD
 

I treat women who have experienced perinatal mood and anxiety disorders, traumatic birth experiences, infertility, and pregnancy/infant loss. I am a provider through Postpartum Support Virginia, as well, and have certifications through Postpartum Support International.

— Kriston Nixon, Licensed Professional Counselor in Virginia Beach, VA

I am an infant mental health specialist and work directly with new parents/caregivers and their babies, providing developmental guidance and relationship-based support to strengthen dyadic attachment between infants and caregivers. I work with expectant parents, grieving parents, and people who are struggling to become parents. I have extensive experience working with mothers experiencing perinatal mood and anxiety disorders, and helping them to find enjoyment in their babies.

— Samantha Pugh, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Lafayette, CO
 

I am passionate about helping mothers navigate the experience of parenting as spiritual journey. How to use mindfulness to cultivate emotions such as curiosity, peace, gratitude and acceptance about what is. Mothering has been one of my most expansive experiences, offering numerous opportunities for growth... usually by way of triggers. Children are quite skilled in helping us identify areas in need of self reflection and attention.

— Danielle Knapp, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Austin, TX