Relationship / Marriage Issues

Every relationship comes with its fair share of issues. Navigating the complexities of life together is hard enough, but when you start to feel regularly distressed or hopeless, about your relationship, it may be time to seek professional help. No matter what your issues seem to stem from (disagreements about money, sex, stress, chronic illness, mental illness, infidelity, trust, emotional distance, parenting etc.), if you and your partner are arguing more frequently and experiencing feelings of resentment or contempt, it is likely that there are some underlying problems to address. Because many problems in relationships are a result of communication issues, a qualified mental health therapist can teach you to find new ways of talking to each other to help you find your way back to common ground. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s relationship and marriage issues experts today.

Meet the specialists

Relationships can be hard and also rewarding. Whether you are in one or want to be, talking to a someone who has experience can help. I offer both individual and couples work.

— Lauren Bloom, Social Worker in Berkeley, CA
 

No two relationships are the same and everyone brings their own unique style to communicating and loving their partner. My goal is to help those styles become sync while keeping the integrity of each person's identity.

— Rachael Lastoff, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in elon, NC

A lot of times, marriages fall apart because of issues of infidelity and communication. After you or your spouse has had an affair, how do you keep the marriage going when everything points toward divorce? Couples who want to move forward and continue in the marriage, many times, have few options. Where do you turn? Communication is a big word that people frequently use, but rarely understand. What is communication supposed to look like? Is it just talking? Is it intimacy? Is it closeness, or trust? Maybe it's some of all of those things. What is communication supposed to look like in YOUR marriage? Let's work together to find out.

— Zakk Gammon, Pastoral Counselor in Owensboro, KY
 

Long-lasting, successful relationships can be hard work and I believe it is an act of faith and bravery for a couple to acknowledge that a problem exists and make the conscious choice to work with a therapist. Their willingness and commitment to growth is an investment with many benefits. I work from a systems perspective—that problems between a couple are best treated by changing the way the "couple" works rather than trying to fix just one person in the relationship. My goal is to help them restore their relationship to a healthier level of functioning without either partner having to breach their core values, dreams, or deeply held beliefs. Another approach I use are the techniques of Emotionally Focused Therapy. I encourage couples to express their actions and emotions in a non-judgmental environment. By observing the feelings of one partner, the other can gain insight and perception into the effect their own actions have on the relationship as a whole.

— Debra Schnack, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR

Intimate relationships can be a source of great joy and fulfillment. But they are also an area in which our deepest fears and vulnerabilities become activated. Problems in relationships often come from old ways of coping that served you in the past, but now may be keeping you from feeling fulfilled and satisfied. I offer insightful, direct, and supportive relationship therapy that empowers you to have better relationships by clearly understanding and changing your relationship patterns. My work with relationships is informed by Sue Johnson's Emotionally Focused Therapy which emphasizes creating connection, changing difficult interactions, and healing emotional pain.

— Smadar Salzman, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

I enjoy working with many different kinds of relationships and couples. I have experience working with issues such as infidelity, illness, blended families, navigating open relationships, new engagements, cohabitation, and interracial. I look forward to getting to know your relationship and what goals are important to it. We can strengthen communication skills and hearing everyone's concerns in a safe, non-judgmental space.

— Michelle Chong, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

As a counselor trained specifically in couples, marriage, and family therapy, I specialize in relationship counseling. I support couples from the early stages in premarital counseling, all the way through the lifecycle of a relationship, potentially including divorce counseling. I use Emotion-Focused Couples Therapy as my primary modality, which will support you/your relationship in getting right down to the heart of relational issues in a safe, supportive manner.

— Kelly Arthur, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Portland, OR
 

As a Gottman trained therapist, I love helping couples learn practical tools for dealing with conflict and disconnection. It's common for couples to come in pointing the finger at their partner. I love helping them work *together* on their problems and realize that they're not as messed up as they think they are. One of the challenges in finding a good couples therapist is making sure that both people feel heard and understood. When a therapist takes sides, it's hard to move forward and this is often when people say "couples therapy doesn't work." I like to keep an open perspective about how couples work. Each partner's perspective on the relationship is valid and deserves to be considered. Couples therapy is about learning to communicate better, problem solve with dialogue and understanding, and create space for your partner to be their own person as well as having a deep connection with you. I love supporting couples in creating a relationship that's really meaningful for them.

— Heather Seguin, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Upland, CA

When working with couples I use an Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) informed approach and provide a safe environment where couples can have difficult conversations, express their emotions and come forward with their vulnerabilities. I guide couples in identifying the encumbering cycles they fall into that act as barriers in their relationships. This enables them to create healthier patterns where compassion, warmth, safety, communication and connection becomes possible.

— Duygu Balan, Licensed Professional Counselor in Berkeley, CA
 

I work with a variety of relationship configurations, with individuals, couples and other groupings. I am sex-positive and kink friendly. I work with a variety of individuals who are heterosexual, pansexual, or LGBTQ. I have been trained up to Level 2 in the Gottman approach, which is one of the few evidence-based couples therapy approaches. This approaches involves an extensive assessment followed by a very specific treatment plan focused on the here and now experiences of the couple.

— Karin Wandrei, Clinical Social Worker in Rohnert Park, CA

Perhaps you’re dating and some unhelpful patterns have formed, or you’ve been married a long time and have reached a point where nothing you try seems to be working. It’s likely you see yourselves having the same arguments over and over, or maybe you realize you feel like roommates instead of lovers. Being Level 3 trained in the Gottman Couples Method, I have skills and tools in guiding couples of all ages and stages to managing conflict and building a stronger friendship. Drs. John and Julie Gottman, who have studied couples for over four decades, developed these techniques to help you find out what conflicts mean, how they impact your dreams, goals, and expectations. We’ll learn new ways of communicating, and discover that conflict is not just another argument, but an opportunity to know and love each other more deeply.

— Katheryn de Arakal, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA
 

Relationship and marriage issues are emotionally charged. It is hard to separate what are each person’s own issues from the problems between the individuals. It is easy to be activated by accusations and behaviors of the other person. This makes it hard to know where to start, or even what to believe. Whether your relationship is just growing stale or is co-dependent or even abusive, it is important for you to focus on your own healing and growth. I will help you find your footing, so you have a place to stand in strength and confidence. This will allow you to then work on your relationship issues without having your personal stuff get in the way.

— Jaclin Belabri, Counselor in Vancouver, WA
 

Break-ups, or even taking a relationship to the next level, has the potential to provide new opportunities for support and growth. I guide my clients as they develop an understanding of their roles in relationships and how to balance supporting someone else while still engaging in self-care.

— Matianna Baldassari, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

Trust, intimacy, communication -- breakdowns in any of these can make satisfying long-term relationships difficult to sustain. I can help you explore the obstacles to a fulfilling partnership, and discuss frequent problems that occur, such as lack of transparency about money; differences in sexual desire; imbalances in division of labor; the push-pull between needing to be one's one person and needing to feel at-one with another.

— Jeffrey Kishner, Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY

Relationship counseling is the process of counseling interpersonal relationships in an effort to recognize, and to better manage or reconcile, troublesome differences and repeating patterns of stress upon the relationship. We here at Livewell provide a safe and non-judgmental environment to help couples address issues that affect the relationship.

— Livewell Behavioral Health, Marriage & Family Therapist in Fresno, CA
 

Relationships are one of the most important thing we as human beings have in our life. When our relationships are struggling we begin to struggle. I want to help you have satisfying, strong, healthy relationships in life. Relationships between siblings, family, marriage, parenting, and friendship are all equally important. Together we will restore and mend relationship brokenness, hurts, resentments, and loneliness.

— Erica London, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Vancouver, WA
 

Imagine feeling completely connected with your loved one, partner, or child. Learn how to communicate in a way that you both feel heard and understood. Learn the tools to connect with others with empathy and understanding. Finally have the relationships you have always wanted.

— Kirsten Lesch, Counselor in Skaneateles, NY

I work primarily with individuals and couples. If you are in a relationship, I can help you best if you bring your partner. My skills in this area are unique. Rather than a single method or approach, I will help you with whatever the most important problem is that day. I can do self-pay double sessions or extended sessions as needed. Flexibility is important when I work with couples. There can be enactments, role playing, dating game type questions, communication skills training & teaching

— Elissa Grunblatt, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Amityville, NY

I support couples in increasing intimacy, improving communication, and building trust through using nonviolent communication, embodiment practices, and creating a safe space to talk through what otherwise is difficult to discuss. Www.SanFranciscoIntimacyTherapist.com

— Karen Wolfe, Marriage & Family Therapist in San francisco, CA
 

I work with clients with recurring relational issues or current relationship concerns. This includes friendships, romantic partners, family, etc. If you are having trouble connecting to people in your life that share the same values, or navigating your individual desires amidst expectations in a relationship, or feeling that your feelings are frequently impacted by others, let's work together on taking inventory of your current relationships, setting helpful boundaries, and accessing the right people for you.

— Alysa Romano, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

Relationships of all kinds take work and nurturing. I work with clients to understand their own relational needs and to find health and happiness within their own personal relationships.

— Krystal Marcinkiewicz, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Beaverton, OR
 

Working with relationships is different than other types of therapy. Relationship therapy requires a unique perspective and specialized solutions. A trained, experienced relationship therapist has the unique ability see the patterns that exist between two people and make complicated situations easier to understand. I utilize Imago as a basic framework and sprinkle in some CBT, and solution-focused therapy to help understand and address the issues that exist in the relationship.

— Kari Silverberg, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Monticello, MN

When our relationships hurt, we hurt. Thankfully, there are solid, research-based treatments for hurting marriages or relationships. I utilize two approaches, the Gottman Method and Emotionally Focused Therapy for Couples. Both approaches focus on the attachment between the partners, how that attachment bond gets wounded, and how to repair it in order to restore the relationship to health. Many couples, after having done this work, report being closer than they have been in a very long time. Sometimes, couples are not sure whether or not to stay in the relationship. Or perhaps one partner wants to stay and the other wants to leave. For these couples, I offer a special process called Discernment Counseling. Discernment Counseling is not therapy. It is a 5-7 session process of deciding whether to divorce, take a break for awhile, or begin therapy to work on healing the relationship. It is a safe, non-blaming way to come to some decisions about the future.

— Diana Walla, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in West Lake Hills, TX
 

In my framework, I sincerely believe that everyone has great potential. Our collaboration will help you expand your awareness, to gently and non-judgmentally explore and untangle that which is trapping you and making you feel stuck. By expanding your awareness, you may experience the freedom to make meaningful choices, develop or recover the courage to express your authentic self, and cultivate fulfilling relationships.

— Roby Shamas, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Campbell, CA

I am a Gottman Informed Therapist and continue to use the Gottman Method in helping relationships grow and heal.

— Josie Oldham, Counselor in Wichita, KS
 

You’ve been on great vacations together. Faced the ups and down together. Losing jobs, promotions; new cities, new friends, new paths. Making discoveries you never imagined. You’ve loved. Lived. Fought. Loved again. Lived some more. Fought some more. Loved again, more. Yet somehow, here you are, asking (or at least considering…) this question: Is my marriage (or relationship) worth saving? Being in a marriage, or relationship, you will have felt that it offers both some of the most deeply rewarding experiences and some the most challenging ones. Intimate relationships require honesty, in all things. This relationship asks of us friendship and joy, especially to ourselves. And it asks of us courage, to love wholeheartedly and allow ourselves to be wholeheartedly loved. For reasons you are able to name (or may not be able to find words for) you may find yourself thinking... ​ Your marriage never felt quite “right” from the start; Your relationship went through a tough challenge and doesn’t feel the same anymore; You changed, or your partner changed, and it’s no one’s fault, but now you’re moving in different directions; You or your partner have met someone new; Time and growth has made you aware that you want a different life from the one you’ve been living. What do you do when you face these questions: Is my marriage worth investing in? Is my marriage worth saving? Do I want to stay? There is nothing wrong with questioning the future of your relationship. But how you use these doubts to help you understand what you are needing more of, and find ways to strengthen yourself and your relationship can make all the difference. ​ Questions and doubts can offer the impetus to deepen into your marriage and commitment with each other, and to deepen into your relationship and commitment to yourself. Questions can invite you both to explore your relationship’s contours. We are here, and ready to roll up our sleeves with you and figure out what happens now.

— Elyse Gong, Clinical Social Worker in Berkeley, CA

My license is in Marriage & Family Therapy which means I am specifically trained and skilled to work on relationships of all configurations. I have strong interests in working with adult clients of childhood alcoholic and/or abusive (emotional, physical, mental, sexual) homes as well as divorce. I have advanced training in Attachment Theory from a Somatic perspective which I find especially effective when working with clients on this topic. I have both personal and professional experience with marriage, open relationships, divorce, conscious uncoupling and the poly lifestyle.

— Vanessa Tate, Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO
 

Many of us struggle with living in harmony with those we love. And there are times when relationships become so toxic that change may be needed. We cannot change the way others think and behave, but we can change our responses to others. Sometimes we become entrenched in our own ways of thinking that we fail to respect others. Or we may become so concerned about others that we forget to take care of ourselves. Keys to healthy relationships is self-care, setting boundaries and keeping balance.

— Laura Greenlee, Psychologist in Asheville, NC
 

Relationship issues are the focus of my practice, and also what drew me to this work in the first place . Even when I see people individually typically they're discussing their relationships- whether romantic or otherwise. Relationships are key in our lives, and there's nothing I love more than helping people struggling in a relationship, start to find their footing and gain confidence and connection with each other again.

— Molly Lizzio, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Syracuse, NY

I specialize in working with people having relationship issues. Relationship issues can be anywhere from considering ending the relationship to just wanting to improve communication or sex. For those considering divorce, I am trained in a special process called Discernment Counseling. These sessions offer a couple a bird's eye view of the relationship, how it got to this point and what would need to change. It gives them a chance to make an informed decision on staying together or breaking up.

— Corrin Voeller, Marriage & Family Therapist in St. Louis Park, MN
 

I specialize in cross-cultural marital and pre-marital therapy, as well as helping expats and trailing spouses adjust to increased marital stress that can accompany living abroad. I also help people with conflicted family, in-law or work relationships.

— Megan Zesati, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX

Partnership can be difficult. It shows us things we otherwise don't know about ourselves. It can bring so much joy and so much heartache over the years. We can develop some bad habits over time that we can't seem to get out of. I stay engaged with couples and help them figure out new ways of knowing themselves and each other better.

— Deva Segal, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

Over the years I have developed and led groups and couples, exploring relationship patterns, understanding the influence of life experiences on relationships, and creating change plans to address what is not working.

— John Eichenberger, Counselor in Fairport, NY
 

The thought of going to couples therapy can be scary and taking those first steps takes courage. It may have been a long time since you felt you could be vulnerable with your partner. Whether you and your spouse or partner are experiencing high levels of conflict, devastating distance, or just need some help getting through a tough time, I can help. I receive ongoing training in Emotionally Focused Therapy; a warm, nonjudgmental approach that helps couples create a positive, more secure bond. This approach has been validated by research as effective for many couples. My goal is to help couples experience more intimacy, understanding, and stability.

— Allison O'Brien, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Atlanta, GA

Relationship concerns of all kinds are an area of deep specialization for me. I became certified by the Gottman Institute of Seattle over 10 years ago. I apply the research from the Gottman Insitute in my work with individual clients as well as couples of all kinds. This training involved attending a series of live workshops in Seattle and then individual supervision with a seasoned Gottman Therapist. The supervision meetings were based on reviewing video samples of me as I used the research principles during actual client sessions. This allowed me to get feedback and eventually demonstrate competence with the concepts and techniques of Gottman's work. This program was rigorous and rewarding. Since going through this training, I am never at a loss for words with couples. I have a reliable sense of how best to pace our sessions and can share materials and ideas that keep people steadily progressing toward their goals.

— Kate McNulty, Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR
 

Because I have expertise in marriage and family issues, I am extremely passionate about helping relationships of all kinds improve. I focus on communication issues such as learning how to not make assumptions as well as how to speak to one another in preferred love languages.

— Karen Foreman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in AURORA, IL

One of my main focuses in private practice is to work with couples to strengthen their relationship. I am a certified PREPARE/ENRICH facilitator which allows me to provide couples with standardized assessment tools and treatment plans to increase growth and understanding.

— Pak Poon, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in South Pasadena, CA
 

As a Certified Emotionally Focused Therapist for couples, I help you figure out how and why you end up fighting about "nothing" or about that thing that your partner does that gets under your skin. I help create relationships that heal, rather than just healing relationships. EFT helps you figure out why your best efforts to make the relationship work sometimes bring the opposite result.

— Annette Holloway, Clinical Psychologist in San Francisco, CA

I have received training in Emotionally Focused Couples counseling and Gottman Couples Method. I work with a range of couples on intimacy, communication, and conflict.

— Nancy Chirinos, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

Relationships are the foundation of life. They are also where our greatest struggles arise. It is this complexity that can overwhelm and confuse us and entice us to lean on dysfunctional patterns. Through an exploration of present and past experiences, I make use of experiential modalities to create new experiences that allow for an expanded sense of what is possible in relationship.

— Camillia Thompson, Counselor in PORTLAND, OR

Relationship and marriage issues are emotionally charged. It is hard to separate what are each person’s own issues from the problems between the individuals. It is easy to be activated by accusations and behaviors of the other person. This makes it hard to know where to start, or even what to believe. Whether your relationship is just growing stale or is co-dependent or even abusive, it is important for you to focus on your own healing and growth. I will help you find your footing, so you have a place to stand in strength and confidence. This will allow you to then work on your relationship issues without having your personal stuff get in the way.

— Jaclin Belabri, Counselor in Vancouver, WA
 

Relationship and marriage issues are emotionally charged. It is hard to separate what are each person’s own issues from the problems between the individuals. It is easy to be activated by accusations and behaviors of the other person. This makes it hard to know where to start, or even what to believe. Whether your relationship is just growing stale or is co-dependent or even abusive, it is important for you to focus on your own healing and growth. I will help you find your footing, so you have a place to stand in strength and confidence. This will allow you to then work on your relationship issues without having your personal stuff get in the way.

— Jaclin Belabri, Counselor in Vancouver, WA

I used the Gottman's method of couples counseling. In this approach, the focus is on the relationship, opening up the lines of communication, and helping both partners feel heard. This is often at the core of why relationships grind to a stop. Having a third impartial party help you move these issues along can restore your hope in your relationship.

— Christa Vermillera, Counselor in Melbourne, FL
 

Avoiding conflict with your spouse because you fear nothing will get resolved in your relationship? Feel discouraged or helpless because the same types of fights with your partner happen over and over again? Suffering due to cheating or infidelity in your relationship? Whether you’re just looking to improve your relationship, or are experiencing more serious problems, I can help. I help couples create more safe, stable, and intimate relationships so you can learn to trust and rely on one another to meet your deepest wants and needs.

— Jon Fox, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

Relationship and marriage issues are emotionally charged. It is hard to separate what are each person’s own issues from the problems between the individuals. It is easy to be activated by accusations and behaviors of the other person. This makes it hard to know where to start, or even what to believe. Whether your relationship is just growing stale or is co-dependent or even abusive, it is important for you to focus on your own healing and growth. I will help you find your footing, so you have a place to stand in strength and confidence. This will allow you to then work on your relationship issues without having your personal stuff get in the way.

— Jaclin Belabri, Counselor in Vancouver, WA
 

I specialize in working with couples. My approach in couples therapy is fair, kind and collaborative. Often couples that come to me for help have found themselves locked in a pattern of relating that leads again and again to the problems they are hoping to address in couples therapy. I help couples identify and alter these patterns, often with insight into how they developed in the first place. We might also explore the connection between these patterns and each partner’s experience of early formative relationships.

— Bear Korngold, Clinical Psychologist in San Francisco, CA

When I work with you as a couple, we go deeper than what’s on the surface to explore the underlying emotions that are affecting how you relate to each other. Emotionally focused therapy for couples and Prepare/Enrich assessments are valuable tools I use to help you get a clearer understanding of your relationship and see positive changes. You CAN come out of a difficult time stronger and closer than ever.

— Lisa Hedden, Counselor in Tucker, GA
 

I am passionate about helping couples find effective ways to manage the conflict that exists in all of our human relationships. I received specialized graduate and postgraduate training in evidence-based couples therapies. I draw on this training as well as a growth-oriented approach to help couples find a path toward a beautiful life together. There is no “right” and “wrong”, and we can all learn better ways to engage with each other as we discover this important truth.

— Sarah Murphy, Counselor in Bryn Mawr, PA

Your partner's needs are unique to them - there is no formula here. But, there are things you can do (and not do) that will likely help. Or at least, things you can try to see if they help. I work with you to discover tools, skills, and ways of engaging with your partner that can profoundly transform your relationship, and help your partner feel safe and supported. And, even though your partner is the one who has experienced trauma, you are still a whole person, with all your own thoughts, feelings and needs. You get to have space to process this too, and there are a lot of ways that you can be supported in what you're going through. I work with you to figure out what it is that you need, and how you can pursue the resources that feel right for you.

— Maya Grodman, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Dr. Jones provides marriage counseling using a judgment-free approach. He does not serve as a referee and he does not waste time session after session focusing on what each partner has said or done. He avoids what he terms “a pathway of blame” in marriage counseling. Pasadena couples will instead find guidance and techniques that helps each person in the relationship to step outside of their situation and to see the other anew. One of the goals of Dr. Jones’ work is to help marriages—whether they are as old as three years, five years, or fifteen years—to move beyond failed patterns and to return to a notion of service to one another. He addresses a variety of concerns, from the “Sexless Marriage” issue to financial arguments to a lack of affection or understanding.

— Raymond Jones, Sex Therapist in Covina, CA

I focused on relationship issues in my Master's degree in Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling. I love working with people at all stages of relationships; pre-commitment, during parenting, or in high conflict times. I am happy to work with you on navigating communication, sexual issues, infidelity, or exploring the future of your relationship. I encourage you to come in for a consultation to see if we are a good fit.

— Nina Landey, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Relationships are hard. Most of us enter into them without knowing what we might get out of them. We hope to experience respect, love, encouragement, happiness, connection and fun but sometimes, that’s not the case. Couples therapy allows us to carve out a specific time in our days to align with our partners. It teaches tools to listen and to communicate more effectively and provides a safe space for honest feelings to be expressed and needs to be stated. It holds both partners accountable for problems, successes and working toward change. Reasons for couples counseling include, but are not limited to not feeling heard, seen or understood; feeling distant from your partner; having the same argument over and over; not knowing how to align on key issues; feeling dissatisfied with your sex life; betrayal; wanting to end the relationship. Couples also come in when things are going well to strengthen the bond, spruce things up or just make sure that you're on the same page.

— Minal Nebhnani, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Francisco, CA

Trust, intimacy, communication -- breakdowns in any of these can make satisfying long-term relationships difficult to sustain. I can help you explore the obstacles to a fulfilling partnership, and discuss frequent problems that occur, such as lack of transparency about money; differences in sexual desire; imbalances in division of labor; the push-pull between needing to be one's one person and needing to feel at-one with another.

— Jeffrey Kishner, Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY
 

From couples wanting a better connection, to those trying to overcome infidelity and other relationship injuries, I will, in a non-judgemental compassionate manner, help you learn a more authentic way of communicating that can result in increased intimacy and stronger bonds that continue improving well beyond the end of therapy. My method of couples treatment is Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT). A short term structured approach, EFT is extensively researched with studies showing 70% to 75% of couples move from distress to recovery, often accompanied by decreased symptoms of other mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, and PTSD. I welcome traditional and non-traditional couples and will never give up on your relationship. I will work to help you create a partnership in which you can be your true authentic selves. Many people can't even imagine what that would be like. But it really is possible. And it feels incredible. Couples therapy is a specialty. A great individual therapist who has limited training and experience with couples can actually do more harm than good to a relationship. EFT is the best researched and most effective couples therapy available today. Your relationship deserves a chance, and EFT gives it the best chance.

— Jonathan Zalesne, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denver, CO

All couples are welcome at Refresh Therapy. Whether you are dating, living together, engaged, married or anything in between—couples therapy can be a great way to improve your relationship. We believe that each couple has its own unique challenges and history, and we tailor our services to meet your specific needs.

— Refresh Therapy, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Vancouver, WA
 

Relationship and marriage issues are emotionally charged. It is hard to separate what are each person’s own issues from the problems between the individuals. It is easy to be activated by accusations and behaviors of the other person. This makes it hard to know where to start, or even what to believe. Whether your relationship is just growing stale or is co-dependent or even abusive, it is important for you to focus on your own healing and growth. I will help you find your footing, so you have a place to stand in strength and confidence. This will allow you to then work on your relationship issues without having your personal stuff get in the way.

— Jaclin Belabri, Counselor in Vancouver, WA

My license is in Marriage & Family Therapy which means I am trained and skilled to work on relationships of all configurations. I have strong interests in working with adult clients of childhood alcoholic and/or abusive homes as well as divorce and

— Vanessa Tate, Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO
 

Relationship issues in heterosexual and LGBTQ community, co-parenting, infidelity, divorce

— Junhong (June) Cao, Clinical Psychologist in New York, NY

Whether you're looking to strengthen your relationship, decrease conflict, resolve sexual problems, or reevaluate your committment together, I can support and guide you toward resolution. I am LGBTQ affirming and welcome any and all clients who seek a safe and constructive place to work toward resolution in their relationship(s).

— Sarah Bower Ho, MA, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Relationship issues are the focus of my practice, and also what drew me to this work in the first place . Even when I see people individually typically they're discussing their relationships- whether romantic or otherwise. Relationships are key in our lives, and there's nothing I love more than helping people struggling in a relationship, start to find their footing and gain confidence and connection with each other again.

— Molly Lizzio, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Syracuse, NY

I am very effective with couples and this is one of my strongest areas of expertise. I help couples to have better communication, trust and a stronger commitment and connection.

— Montrella Cowan, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Washington, DC
 

Relationship and Marriage issues My PhD is in Couples and Family Therapy. Here's my take: Miscommunication can lead to misunderstandings, hurt feelings and resentment. Resentment takes up so much space, there is barely room for connection and intimacy. I work with the couple to get their relationship back on track, through learning communication skills, practicing compassion, clearing out resentment and making space for building respect, connection and intimacy. - Setting realistic specific goals is a large part of what we work on. Especially looking at needs, strengths and past experiences with disappointment. - Embracing style differences rather than feeling threatened by them. This is especially true with couples of different cultural and ethnic growing up experiences. - Identifying their early messages that get in the way of their relationship. My strengths are that I am warm, insightful, intuitive, accessible, collaborative, respectfully direct and wise. As a CBT therapist I

— Elayne Savage, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

Relationship and marriage issues are emotionally charged. It is hard to separate what are each person’s own issues from the problems between the individuals. It is easy to be activated by accusations and behaviors of the other person. This makes it hard to know where to start, or even what to believe. Whether your relationship is just growing stale or is co-dependent or even abusive, it is important for you to focus on your own healing and growth. I will help you find your footing, so you have a place to stand in strength and confidence. This will allow you to then work on your relationship issues without having your personal stuff get in the way.

— Jaclin Belabri, Counselor in Vancouver, WA
 

Couples who knocks on my door to get help often ask a very similar question: Where did our love go? They tried hard to solve what they thought was the problem, but the more they tried, the more it left them feeling pain, distress, and even a loss of hope for the road ahead. Does this sound familiar to you? When I work with couples, I focus on the vicious cycle of interactions in which the couple is trapped. A "no-win" cycle that leaves you and your partner feelings of rejection and isolation. Rather than turning towards each other, you turn away from each other, which creates attachment wounds. When a relationship fails, conflicts are often the reason to blame. However, conflicts are not the real enemy here. It is the loss of affection and emotional responsiveness that endangers the relationship. When that loss is experienced in a relationship, you can't help but wonder if you can trust that your partner is really there for you. You wonder if you can trust that your partner will respond to you when you need. The truth is that relationships require hard work. It demands your and your partners’ intention to create and nurture the emotional bond that makes you both feel safe, secure, and connected. It is not an easy task, especially when infidelity, addiction, and/or trauma are involved, but I promise you it is well worth it. Over the years I have helps couples like yourselves find hope again in their relationships, and now I would like to reach out and ask you to make the choice of letting me to help you.

— Ngoc "Michelle" Turner, Marriage & Family Therapist in Frisco, TX

In our western society, we're moving further and further away from our natural supports. We no longer live in villages, with extended family and neighbors close by. Instead, our intimate partner becomes a very important person to us because they're all we have. When that relationship is down in the dumps, it can really affect us. For that reason, I'm passionate about helping unhappy couples find safety and connection in their relationship. When couples sense that they're close to their partner and their partner has their back, they can navigate the world with greater confidence.

— Ada Pang, Counselor in Redmond, WA
 

I specialize in working with multiracial couples or couples who are navigating significant differences in background, upbringing, or seeking to be grow beyond what they were given in their families of origin. Issues addressed include challenges with intimacy, betrayal, and difficulties with communication that escalate. Even when you have many similarities -- cultural or racial differences, regional differences, personality differences, gender socialization differences, differences in how you were raised, or opinion -- can lead to conflict. These underlying (sometimes obvious, sometimes not in your awareness) patterns from the past, ingrained values, or even stuff you thought you had worked through, can show up as get closer and deepen commitments. I particularly work with couples where one or both members are immigrants or children of immigrants, Asian American, or also navigating cultural differences intergenerationally from their parents. Here are some issues in which I support you Improving Communication * Support in having difficult conversations * Learning skills to navigate difficult conversations on your own. * Making communication easier * Staying True to Your Own Needs, While Staying Connected * Healing Interenerational Trauma * Early Childhood Trauma and Mental Health Challenges in Relationship My approach to couples therapy focuses on attachment, theories of effective communication and bridging differences, and the importance of the emotional bond.

— Eveline Wu, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

You’ve been on great vacations together. Faced the ups and down together. Losing jobs, promotions; new cities, new friends, new paths. Making discoveries you never imagined. You’ve loved. Lived. Fought. Loved again. Lived some more. Fought some more. Loved again, more. Yet somehow, here you are, asking (or at least considering…) this question: Is my marriage (or relationship) worth saving? Being in a marriage, or relationship, you will have felt that it offers both some of the most deeply rewarding experiences and some the most challenging ones. Intimate relationships require honesty, in all things. This relationship asks of us friendship and joy, especially to ourselves. And it asks of us courage, to love wholeheartedly and allow ourselves to be wholeheartedly loved. For reasons you are able to name (or may not be able to find words for) you may find yourself thinking... ​ Your marriage never felt quite “right” from the start; Your relationship went through a tough challenge and doesn’t feel the same anymore; You changed, or your partner changed, and it’s no one’s fault, but now you’re moving in different directions; You or your partner have met someone new; Time and growth has made you aware that you want a different life from the one you’ve been living. What do you do when you face these questions: Is my marriage worth investing in? Is my marriage worth saving? Do I want to stay? There is nothing wrong with questioning the future of your relationship. But how you use these doubts to help you understand what you are needing more of, and find ways to strengthen yourself and your relationship can make all the difference. ​ Questions and doubts can offer the impetus to deepen into your marriage and commitment with each other, and to deepen into your relationship and commitment to yourself. Questions can invite you both to explore your relationship’s contours. We are here, and ready to roll up our sleeves with you and figure out what happens now.

— Anna Lewis, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

I help individuals communicate honestly and assertively to get their needs met. Then, they can clearly decide how to proceed to develop themselves within their relationship, or they can make clear-headed decisions about whether to stay in the relationship. Relationship preservation is not my goal; individual development within relationship is.

— Andrea Rogers, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA

I believe therapy is a unique opportunity to change patterns of interaction in session that can alter the relationship outside of therapy. My approach involves highlighting mutually reinforcing patterns of interaction, exploring family of origin and unresolved issues, and collaborating with both partners to find new solutions. My passions in working with couples include: -Navigating transitions in the relationship–moving in, getting married, thinking about breaking up or getting divorced -Creating emotional safety for both partners and a more secure connection -Identifying the cycle of interaction in your relationship -Working with the push-pull of individuality and togetherness(“me time” versus “quality time”) -Managing conflict and getting to the deeper issues contributing to conflict -Uncovering unresolved family of origin issues that are interfering in your relationship

— Alex Barnette, Counselor in Austin, TX
 

Couples learn: •How to discuss those “hot topics” that are causing emotional distance. •New problem solving techniques to find areas of compromise and understanding. •Effective tools to help rebuild their trust and friendship. •How to explore each other’s value systems in ways that don’t feel threatening.

— Dana McNeil, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA

The value of a strong, fulfilling, relationship is undeniable: you get love, companionship, adventure, affection, stability, and even better health. For marriages to survive and for long-term relationships to flourish, couples must have education, support and practical tools. One of the most enjoyable aspects of the work I do is witnessing a couple strengthen their connection and deepen their intimacy by implementing these tools.

— Sara Collins, Counselor in Salt Lake City, UT

I hold a Master's degree in Marriage & Family Therapy and am passionate about helping couples work out their issues to develop healthier, happier relationships.

— Aaron Potratz, Counselor in Tigard, OR
 

We want freedom and intimacy. We want to feel like we’re at home and at the same time we want spontaneity. We want the security of deeply knowing someone but we’re afraid to let that person in. We seek everything from one person that a whole village used to provide. There are plenty of reasons why you might be feeling unsatisfied or hurt or betrayed or all of the of the above in your relationship. I want to guide you in understanding the complexities of modern love and support you in managing these paradoxes.

— Madeline Fox, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR

Even strong relationships experience some degree of conflict. It’s when conflict intrudes on your life and happiness, that couples therapy can help.

— Kirsten Lesch, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Southampton, NY
 

Relationships have the potential to help us feel incredibly valuable and connected, or also to feel lonely and excluded. I enjoy working with couples who feel disconnected or are arguing constantly, and would like to rekindle the love and affection they once had.

— Sharon Hale, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Tigard, OR

Couples therapy can be an exciting and powerful arena for change in your relationship. The research suggests that conflict isn't solely responsible for our problems in relationship, but rather, a painful sense of emotional disconnection from our partner; Which in turn, gives way to protest behaviors such as panic, chasing, violating relationship agreements, loneliness, communication difficulties, hostility and any number of impediments to feeling safe and loved in our relationships. Through our work together in therapy, I will help you and your partner(s) move into new and radical moments of engagement, all the while, building the trust, intimacy and security that you might have lost.

— Pilar Dellano, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

Trust, intimacy, communication -- breakdowns in any of these can make satisfying long-term relationships difficult to sustain. I can help you explore the obstacles to a fulfilling partnership, and discuss frequent problems that occur, such as lack of transparency about money; differences in sexual desire; imbalances in division of labor; the push-pull between needing to be one's one person and needing to feel at-one with another.

— Jeffrey Kishner, Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY

As a sex therapist I am often working with couples. So in addition to the sex therapy training, I also have "relationship" training. I really like the Gottman Method for couples counseling because the Gottman's incorporate a lot of theories into their approach. They are down to earth and well researched! Their methods work! My goal is to teach you how to engage in positive, productive dyadic communication, so you won't need me to follow you around and facilitate all of your conversations.

— Paula Kirsch, Clinical Social Worker in Detroit, MI
 

Long-lasting, successful relationships can be hard work and I believe it is an act of faith and bravery for a couple to acknowledge that a problem exists and make the conscious choice to work with a therapist. Their willingness and commitment to growth is an investment with many benefits. My primary approach when working with couples is using the techniques of Emotionally Focused Therapy. As an EFT therapist, I encourage couples to express their actions and emotions in a secure, non-judgmental environment. By observing the release of feelings, emotions, and anxieties of one partner, the other can gain new insight and perception into the effect their own actions and behaviors have on the relationship as a whole. I believe that problems between a couple are best treated by changing the way the "couple" works rather than trying to fix just one person in the relationship. My goal is to help them restore their relationship to a better and healthier level of functioning.

— Debra Schnack, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR
 

I love to help people to create healthier relationships, especially with their significant others. I believe that intimate connection with other human beings is one of our most basic and deep needs, yet we are seldom taught how to build healthy relationships. That is why I am passionate about sharing the communication and intimacy skills that I've learned both in my professional career and in my personal journey in a happy 20-year marriage. What I'm most excited about is the fact that I can help individuals create healthier relationships even if their partner is not available or willing to work on the relationship at that moment. What it takes is a commitment on the part of the individual to work on their part of the relationship dynamic to produce quick yet lasting and rewarding changes.

— Raquel Muller, Psychologist in Tigard, OR

I believe therapy is a unique opportunity to change patterns of interaction in session that can alter the relationship outside of therapy. My approach involves highlighting mutually reinforcing patterns of interaction, exploring family of origin and unresolved issues, and collaborating with both partners to find new solutions. My passions in working with couples include: • Navigating transitions in the relationship–moving in, getting married, thinking about breaking up or getting divorced • Creating emotional safety for both partners and a more secure connection • Identifying the cycle of interaction in your relationship • Working with the push-pull of individuality and togetherness(“me time” versus “quality time”) • Managing conflict and getting to the deeper issues contributing to conflict • Uncovering unresolved family of origin issues that are interfering in your relationship

— Alex Barnette, Counselor in Austin, TX
 

Although therapy has become less stigmatized in the past few decades, some people still feel that seeing a therapist means admitting they are broken or weak. Unfortunately, this prevents many from accessing the mental health care they need. Beginning therapy takes courage, and making the decision to seek help actually means you are strong, self-aware, and brave.

— Jessica Sassoon, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Los Angeles, CA

Building and maintaining a good relationship is not always easy. You may be in a relationship currently where you feel unfulfilled and are struggling to have a deeper connection with your partner. Having a healthy relationship takes work. The day to day challenges can put a tremendous strain on a relationship and not having the right tools can make it even harder. Healing a relationship that is hurting is possible. Even when something as devastating as an affair has occurred, I believe in the transformation that counseling can offer when two people are committed to change, growth and their love for each other. Couples counseling can help you uncover the barriers that keep you and your partner from having the relationship you both want. You will learn practical tools to enhance your communication, build intimacy and to show unconditional positive regard for one another. My desire is to help you and your partner grow towards the relationship you desire.

— Kerri-Anne Brown, Licensed Professional Counselor in Orlando, FL
 

Looking for outside help in your relationship can be one of the best things you can do for your relationship or marriage. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, contact us today .

— JADI FERGEN, Counselor in Colorado Springs, CO

I love working with couples! It is something I am passionate about. I help couples by helping them discover the patterns of interactions that sabotage their relationship. It's about understanding how to communicate differently and understanding how our own wounds affect each other. I use an emotionally focused approach that helps couples reconnect and end the distance they feel with each other.

— Gordon Brewer, Counselor in Kingsport, TN
 

I help clients explore issues around trust, intimacy, and communication, and I help them navigate the struggles that arise during long-term relationships and cohabitation. Differences in sexual desire; imbalances in division of labor; lack of transparency about spending; spending time apart -- we can explore the problems that get in the way of a deeply satisfying and intimate partnership.

— Jeffrey Kishner, Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY

Many clients attend therapy upon feet interpersonal conflict within their marriage or relationship. Some folks report an affair, or feelings of betrayal due to lack connection and intimacy.

— Marissa Talarico, Counselor in Vancovuer, WA
 

I have a masters degree in marriage and family therapy. My training in couples counseling best fits couples that have been together a shorter time and would like to steer clear of repeating old unhealthy habits from past relationships. I see many couples that would like premarital counseling or couples that are newly married and experiencing some road bumps in their relationship.

— Jeff Guenther, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Every relationship presents its own unique challenges and growing opportunities. I specialize in helping couples, and poly groups understand their own backgrounds, approaches to communication, conflict, sexuality, growth, changes, and love to facilitate healthy workable relationships.

— Jon Fenton, Mental Health Counselor in Portland, OR

Although we are usually adept at forging friendships, few of us begin their lives as adults understanding or appreciating the rigorous commitment and sustained open-heartedness needed to foster and nurture prolonged intimacy with another person. When conflicts emerge, we often begin to doubt the viability of our relationship, rather than recognize the conflicts as a part of the ebb and flow of coupled life or an opportunity for growth. As a therapist, I enjoy helping couples learn together and in the process, not only become close, but develop the understanding that will help them to live with more ease, joy and confidence together. In addition to helping you develop more insight and awareness regarding your unique dynamics as a couple, I will help you develop the interpersonal skills you will need to navigate or traverse impasses or tensions in the future with less impact on your experience of closeness.

— Rawna Romero, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Alameda, CA
 

Relationships are one of life's greatest teachers. Couples often benefit from an objective professional to help guide them towards healthier communication and deeper understanding. I enjoy working with couples of all constellations and couples that are navigating difference across culture, religion, gender and identity. I have been practicing couples therapy for the past four years and I have received specialized consultation and training in the area of couples therapy. I draw from EFT and attachment theory, in my work with couples.

— Addie Liechty, Clinical Social Worker in Oakland, CA

Because of the emotional complexity in romantic relationships, it can be hard to take a step back at times when things get off track. Relationship counseling can help you regain intimacy and rebuild a solid foundation. For new relationships, it can help to form healthy relationship patterns from the start to maintain individuality within the relationship and strengthen the bond as a couple. All couples and relationships are welcomed.

— Melissa Kramer, Clinical Social Worker in Red Bank, NJ
 

As a Marriage and Family Therapist, I have specialized training in relationship dynamics, interactive patterns and behavior cycles. This basically means, I can help you understand how you go from 0-60 in 5 seconds and keep getting sucked into the same argument.

— Faith Dulin, Marriage & Family Therapist in Charlotte, NC

My license is in Marriage & Family Therapy which means I am trained and skilled to work on relationships of all configurations. I have strong interests in working with adult clients of childhood alcoholic and/or abusive homes as well as divorce and

— Vanessa Tate, Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO
 

Relationship difficulties are painful and all consuming, and are not limited to intimate partners; friend, family, and coworker relationships can also wreak havoc on our day to day lives. You might feel like you are on a roller coaster-one day is perfect, the next awful and back up and down again and again. You may fear being rejected if people really knew you, or feel that you are responsible for making sure your entire family is always happy.

— Christina Wall, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Lake Oswego, OR

I have studied the Gottman method and spent the last 3 years really focusing on this particular treatment area. I have studied and employed an array of techniques and have found my work with individuals and couples facing relationship challenges or wanting to lay a solid relationship foundation incredibly rewarding!

— Rachel Stapleton, Clinical Social Worker in Kirkland, WA
 

Relationships are hard and like a car sometimes they need a tune up. You need someone to guide you to healing and health in the relationship. Conflicts and concerns that surface in a partnership are more complex than what they seem on the surface. Sometimes, it is very hard to fix these problems simply by improving communications, developing intimacy and establishing common goals for the relationship. My style is to dig more into what causes the problem for the couple as those conflicts emerge onto the relationship through communications, actions or reactions, disconnected feelings, betrayals and/or affairs. As a couples’ therapist, I view interactions and dynamics in a relationship that become troubled in context. I seek to understand how the problems presented are informed by the relationship, as well as each person’s history and belief system that is brought into the relationship.

— Filippo M. Forni, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

This is one of my strongest areas of expertise. I help couples to have the relationship that they always intended to have with the love of their life. My clients have thanked me for helping them to build trust, communication, connection, and affinity.

— Montrella Cowan, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Washington, DC
 

Relationships are tough, they require us to be vulnerable, trusting in another, flexible and somehow still true to ourselves. These are big deal things! If you are needing some support around your relationships, we can find new ways for you and your significant other(s) to find common ground once again.

— Lynda Martin, Counselor in New York, NY

Therapy can be extremely effective in helping couples reconnect on a deeper level and rebuild their relationship. With couples therapy, it is possible to rediscover the intimacy you once shared with your partner. I believe that every couple has had a successful past at some point in their relationship. By building on each couple’s past success, I empower them to visualize and create their ideal future.

— ALICIA CLAYBON, Counselor in Montgomery, AL
 

I am a Marriage and Family Therapist. I also have post graduate training in working with same sex couples and LGBTQ families. I have experience with transgender teens and their families, and with couples in which one person is transgender.

— Lori Haas, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Wichita, KS

We've all heard the metaphor of a frog in water. You put one in cold water and raise the temperature by one degree slowly over time. Eventually, that frog will die due to the water being too hot. Another frog is thrown in hot water, and immediately jumps out, saving it's own life. This metaphor is true for relationships. We often don't notice or disregard relationship hurts until we've waiting too late. Unfortunately, I see many couples who have reached the end of their rope and are not willing to put in the effort or stay committed during the couples therapy process. Even the happiest of marriages and relationships have their struggles and it is okay to seek support!

— Miranda Bayard-Clark, Licensed Professional Counselor in Lake Oswego, OR
 

Questioning relationships: sibling, parent/child, partners In relationships mirror the parts of us that want to be looked at

— Ashley Ross, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Pasadena, CA

I have worked with many couples of all orientations to learn now to communicate and build a better life together. Here are some topics I work with most often: Navigating the path to intimacy, Effectively sharing and communicating emotions, Creating romance between best friends, Juggling career, children, and intimacy, Being vulnerable , and Building and repairing the safety of trust. I have experience working with non heteronormative relationships, including poly couples, gay and lesbian relationships, and kink dynamics.

— Kellie Collins, Licensed Professional Counselor in Lake Oswego, OR
 

Marital and relationship issues are one that is very near and dear to my heart. Seeking to understand my own family, I went and received training to help ailing couples and families. I have been trained to do both marital and premarital counseling. I am trained to do Gottman Couples Therapy Method and continuously seek and attend trainings to improve my knowledge of this area of expertise.

— LaShanna Stephens, Counselor in Macon, GA
 

Specialists in Relationship Issues using Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy. Communicate better, grow closer, enjoy sex, and heal hurts.

— Thrive Couple & Family Counseling Services, Counselor in Greenwood Village, CO

I help couples who want to prevent divorce in their relationships see the patterns where they get stuck and learn how to fight fair. When you learn how to fight well and love each other through it, you have an essential skill that will help carry you through difficult times.

— Molly Johnson, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Phoenix, AZ
 

Dating in New York City, let alone Manhattan, is... hard, to put it mildly. You go on date after date, trying to find a genuine connection. Yet you find yourself repeating the same old patterns--in dating and in relationships. Still, it's hard to let go of the past and stay open to new people, without feeling the same old fears. In this city's dating culture, it's hard to figure out how to improve your dating life and nourish real relationships. I can help you find greater balance in your love life, by learning to discern between which relationships to spend time and energy on, and by addressing the patterns that keep you in relationships that aren't worth your time, or are unhealthy. That way, you can build a life that attracts someone who is a better fit for you.

— Daniel Gaztambide, Psychologist in New York, NY

Let’s be honest. Many of us did not have great role-modeling about what healthy relationships look like or how exactly to pull that off. And also…You have a basic human drive to be in relationships and connected with friends, family, co-workers, and romantically. It’s crucial to your survival and happiness. And of course you want to be in relationships where you feel understood, safe, loved, and able to communicate easily without frequent fighting or feeling uncertain. But instead, you end up feeling hurt or misunderstood. You don’t feel comforted or supported in the ways that you need. You don’t feel as close to others as you want to feel. Little issues end up turning into big fights and hurt feelings or maybe you avoid bringing things up because you don’t want an argument. Gottman Method Couples Therapy (GMCT) is based in over 40 years of research into what makes relationships work and what destroys them. GMCT helps improve communication and increase closeness and intimacy.

— Heather McKenzie, Counselor in Raleigh, NC
 

Miscommunication and misaligned values often lead to relational anxiety. Learn ways to identify patterns and change them for good.

— Todd Schmenk, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Providence, RI
 

Most of the clients I work with are couples looking for relationship help. I have worked with hundreds of couples to turn their relationships around.

— Raffi Bilek, Counselor in Baltimore, MD

Relationship and marriage issues are emotionally charged. It is hard to separate what are each person’s own issues from the problems between the individuals. It is easy to be activated by accusations and behaviors of the other person. This makes it hard to know where to start, or even what to believe. Whether your relationship is just growing stale or is co-dependent or even abusive, it is important for you to focus on your own healing and growth. I will help you find your footing, so you have a place to stand in strength and confidence. This will allow you to then work on your relationship issues without having your personal stuff get in the way.

— Jaclin Belabri, Counselor in Vancouver, WA
 

Many clients come to me when their relationship is stuck, unsatisfactory, or just downright miserable. Often they ask,"Can I work on my relationship if my partner won't come in?" The answer is Yes! You can learn about your own unhealthy relationship patterns and change how you interact– your partner will have to adapt one way or another. The dynamic will not stay the same. Or maybe you are trying to decide whether to get out of a relationship, or how to get over one that just ended. If your partner wants to come in too, that's great! Couples therapy can be a great way not only to improve your relationship, but to grow as a person. I have specific training in relationship therapy, and I have techniques that I can teach you either as a couple or as an individual that will help you improve your relationships, as well as how you feel about yourself. Relationship therapy is all about growing as a person, so that you are available to have a relationship that rocks your life!

— Amy McManus, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

In my therapy and life coaching practice I work with monogamous and non-monogamous couples, who are attempting to bridge differences and meet each others needs and expectations. One of the key factors in healthy couple relationships is to what extent partners or spouses are emotionally accessible, emotionally engaged and emotionally responsive to each other on a regular basis.

— M. Douglas Evans, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Ann Arbor, MI
 

Difficulty communicating Mismatched sexual desire Interest in alternative sexual lifestyles, including BDSM/kink/poly/non-monogamy/furries

— Kelifern Pomeranz, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Menlo Park, CA

I am currently an Assistant Professor at the American Academy of Clinical Sexologists in Orlando, Florida. I have lectured extensively on gay relationship issues, and I have also taught at Florida Atlantic University, Florida International University School of Medicine, The Catholic University of America and The University of Maryland. I am author of the book Sex Happens: The Gay Man’s Guide to Creative Intimacy.

— Arlen Keith Leight, Clinical Social Worker in Rancho Mirage, FL
 

I was trained in Gottman couple therapy, a scientific research based couple therapy method, and Prepare/Enrich program, which is a premarital/marital counseling assessment tool.

— Michelle Chia Ning Chang, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Emeryville, CA

Have you hit a rough time in your relationship with your partner? Struggling with communication, trust or intimacy? Our therapists can work with you individually or as a couple to help get your relationship moving in the right direction. Utilizing evidence based therapies such as Gottman Couples Therapy, Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) and/or a family systems approach can give you the skills and support you need to make effective changes in connections ith people who matter the most.

— Acuity Counseling, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

You’ve been on great vacations together. Faced the ups and down together. Losing jobs, promotions; new cities, new friends, new paths. Making discoveries you never imagined. You’ve loved. Lived. Fought. Loved again. Lived some more. Fought some more. Loved again, more. Yet somehow, here you are, asking (or at least considering…) this question: Is my marriage (or relationship) worth saving? Being in a marriage, or relationship, you will have felt that it offers both some of the most deeply rewarding experiences and some the most challenging ones. Intimate relationships require honesty, in all things. This relationship asks of us friendship and joy, especially to ourselves. And it asks of us courage, to love wholeheartedly and allow ourselves to be wholeheartedly loved. For reasons you are able to name (or may not be able to find words for) you may find yourself thinking... ​ Your marriage never felt quite “right” from the start; Your relationship went through a tough challenge and doesn’t feel the same anymore; You changed, or your partner changed, and it’s no one’s fault, but now you’re moving in different directions; You or your partner have met someone new; Time and growth has made you aware that you want a different life from the one you’ve been living. What do you do when you face these questions: Is my marriage worth investing in? Is my marriage worth saving? Do I want to stay? There is nothing wrong with questioning the future of your relationship. But how you use these doubts to help you understand what you are needing more of, and find ways to strengthen yourself and your relationship can make all the difference. ​ Questions and doubts can offer the impetus to deepen into your marriage and commitment with each other, and to deepen into your relationship and commitment to yourself. Questions can invite you both to explore your relationship’s contours. We are here, and ready to roll up our sleeves with you and figure out what happens now. Oasis' approach to couples therapy: Our first priority in working with a couple is to meet you where you are. Different couples come in to work on different issues. We want our time together to be useful and meaningful to you, and not just help you with the issue that is at the forefront, but rather, give you tools and vocabulary to use down the road. We are interested in helping you two get on the same team. Often, by the time couples see us, there is hurt feeling and a good deal of finger pointing. Our job is to help you recognize that you two are one unit, and the problem is external to that unit. We want to jump in there with you to identify what is and is not working in your relationship, and to focus on blaming less and connecting more. You, as a couple, are the client. We don’t take sides. Instead, we are on the side of you as a couple--we want to see your partnership invigorated and thriving.

— Kathryn Richards, Clinical Social Worker in Berkeley, CA

I believe that the key to strong and enduring relationships is the development of a strong sense of self. While the goal for most couples is to create a deep sense of intimacy, developing a strong sense of self is a prerequisite to creating emotional connection. Initially, the primary focus in my work with individuals, couples, and families is the individual growth and differentiation of each person in order to increase a strong sense of self. My work with clients then moves toward increasing their capacity to accept and tolerate differences, a process that must occur prior to increasing the emotional bond. The objective of my work is to facilitate the process of knowing yourself, which includes knowing what you need and want. You are responsible for articulating what you need and want to your partner and/or others from a direct and non-judgmental perspective that includes self awareness and the desire to know yourself and others you are connected to.There is a 'no secrets' policy in place that applies to my work with couples and families. In other words, I will advocate that you disclose anything that is pertinent to the treatment of the family or the couple system.

— Kathy Hardie-Williams, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Tigard, OR
 

In my work with couples I use two most researched evidence-based approaches Gottman method and Emotionally-Focused therapy.

— Azhar Sultanova, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Portland, OR
 

Relationship and marriage issues are emotionally charged. It is hard to separate what are each person’s own issues from the problems between the individuals. It is easy to be activated by accusations and behaviors of the other person. This makes it hard to know where to start, or even what to believe. Whether your relationship is just growing stale or is co-dependent or even abusive, it is important for you to focus on your own healing and growth. I will help you find your footing, so you have a place to stand in strength and confidence. This will allow you to then work on your relationship issues without having your personal stuff get in the way.

— Jaclin Belabri, Counselor in Vancouver, WA

A relationship can be a fulfilling place for growth and love. It can also be a challenging endeavor. While disagreements and fluctuations in intimacy are normal, sometimes relationship get off track. In couples therapy I provide a space for each individual to be heard and understood. I focus on improving communication and intimacy as well as addressing patterns that may not be working.

— Andy Sussman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in San Francisco, CA
 

I help clients explore issues around trust, intimacy, and communication, and I help them navigate the struggles that arise during long-term relationships and cohabitation. Differences in sexual desire; imbalances in division of labor; lack of transparency about spending; spending time apart -- we can explore the problems that get in the way of a deeply satisfying and intimate partnership.

— Jeffrey Kishner, Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY

It is in relationships that we are wounded; and it is in relationships that we are healed. While problems with communication, conflict resolution, and differences seem to be the problem, most of your fights are really protests over emotional disconnection. Underneath the distress, you are desperate to know: Are you there for me? Will you accept me for who I am? I get to the heart of the matter. I create a safe place for you to send and receive clear emotional signals from each other and connect.

— Casey Lee, Licensed Professional Counselor in Columbia, SC
 

I often work with family systems in which one person is struggling with depression, anxiety, or an eating disorder. My hope is that we can help you identify effective ways to interact with each other, even if you've established long-term roles or unhelpful dynamics. I'm trained in Emotion-Focused Couples Therapy, Emotion-Focused Family Therapy, and the Psychobiological Approach to Couples Therapy.

— Tricia Mihal, Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX

Every couple has a life of it's own. Often the patterns of conflict and disengagement are bigger and more powerful than one person. This is why I help couples not only identify their patterns, but learn new ways of regulating and managing their emotions together... in session. My goal is that you walk away with renewed empathy and deeper connection.

— Connor McClenahan, Counselor in Los Angeles, CA
 

Sometimes in relationships it might feel safer to just walk away or distance yourself from your partner, in hopes the problem will just go away. Oftentimes what might happen is you choose to disconnect, rather than connect. This tends to make relationships feel unbearable and often result in you developing a lack of communication. Why is it that you choose to argue and fight, rather than communicate with one another? Why not find an alternative way to connect that solicits support from your partner? Good news, couples counseling/marriage counseling can help. Partners who create safety and meaning in a relationship also provide freedom to be accepted by each other. Everyone has shortcomings, but these can be the quirks that fuel your passion. This is experienced as a gentle move from blaming and arguing and yelling and lying and cheating to embracing and meaningmaking and accepting and being vulnerable.

— Jeremy Allen, Licensed Professional Counselor in Boulder, CO