Interpersonal Neurobiology (IPNB)

Developed by Dr. Dan Siegel, interpersonal neurobiology is a field of study that looks to identify the similar patterns that arise from separate approaches to knowledge. Interpersonal neurobiology combines research from multiple areas into a framework that examines the common findings in an effort to understand human experience. Anthropology, Biology, computer science, linguistics, math, physics, psychology and psychiatry all contribute to Dr. Siegel’s interpersonal neurobiology theory. Therapists applying IPNB principles typically take a mindfulness approach to treatment that promotes compassion, kindness, resilience, and well-being in the client’s personal life, relationships, and community. Think this approach might work for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s interpersonal neurobiology specialists today.

Meet the specialists

My goal is to promote compassion, kindness, resilience, and well-being in our personal lives, our relationships, and our communities. In an individual’s mind, integration involves the linkage of separate aspects of mental processes such as thought with feeling, bodily sensation with logic. In a relationship, integration entails each person’s being respected for his or her autonomy and differentiated self while at the same time being linked to others in empathic communication.

— Sonya DeWitt, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Spokane, WA
 

There's a nasty myth going around that you can't teach an old dog new tricks. IPNB shows us that this simply isn't true-- that the brain, the mind, and our relationships can and will change throughout the seasons of our lives. More importantly-- we can consciously direct that change, and there is some amazing science out now that can help support our efforts! Interpersonal neurobiology marries attachment theory and neuroscience in a wonderful way. I have been studying IPNB since 2009. I have participated in a twice monthly, two-hour consultation and listening partnership with a seasoned therapist who specializes in IPNB for the last seven years. I have trained with Bonnie Badenoch several times and will be participating in her year-long IPNB immersion program in 2019.

— Ann Stoneson, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX

Interpersonal Neurobiology (IPNB) is an interdisciplinary approach to viewing health as the intersection of brain - mind - relationships. I hold a post-graduate certificate in IPNB from Portland State University and continue to study under the guidance of Dr. Bonnie Badenoch. I integrate IPNB into all aspects of my practice, personal and professional. I find that IPNB normalizes human experience while providing a neurobiological and attachment focused roadmap for healing.

— Carly Henderson, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Interestingly, IPNB is also where neuroscience and spiritual practice often meet, but it comes at it from the sciences first. Our increasing understanding of how our brains and nervous systems process experience, hold trauma, and co-regulate with others helps me bring a deep sense of intuition to my therapeutic work - ironically, the more we learn about the nuts and bolts of neuroscience, the more we're developing the science of "feeling felt" and creating safe space for deep work.

— Duff Stoneson, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Austin, TX

Interpersonal Neurobiology is designed to help people understand their emotions and general life functioning within the context of multiple professional disciplines. IPNB psychotherapy involves integrating knowledge from disciplines as diverse as computer science, sociology, anthropology, linguistics, mental health and several others. Each discipline contributes a unique set of knowledge that help us live an integrative and fulfilling life.

— John Edwards, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oakland, CA
 

The power to heal rests in relationships, our nervous system is wired to become stronger and more adaptive when we can experience ourselves in connection to others. This approach deeply informs parents on how to co-regulate with their children, no matter the age, and partners how to self regulate their emotions while remaining loving and caring with the other person. Mindfulness, is a tool we can together craft and deepen, to gain access to a more connected experience of life.

— Silvia Gozzini, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in PORTLAND, OR

Feeling safe in a therapeutic relationship is the most important aspect of your healing process. I proudly ground my therapeutic work on what is proven to work from a brain science perspective. I'll help you understand what is happening in your brain and body when you feel emotionally dysregulated, anxious, and depressed. We will address what's going on your brain when you are feeling this way and use your body's wisdom to reconnect with you body to find relief.

— Isabel Decian, Counselor in Auburn, WA

IPNB is the study of how the human mind is formed in relationships. According to IPNB, relationships (including ones with a therapist) have the power to effect change on a biological level by changing how our brain cells connect to one another. This is why I believe that creating a safe and supportive relationship is the best avenue for change.

— Jennifer Newbloom, Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

The power to heal rests in relationships, our nervous system is wired to become stronger and more adaptive when we can experience ourselves in connection to others. This approach deeply informs parents on how to co-regulate with their children, no matter the age, and partners how to self regulate their emotions while remaining loving and caring with the other person. Through the use of mindfulness we can together access to a more connected experience of life.

— Silvia Gozzini, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in PORTLAND, OR