Interpersonal Neurobiology (IPNB)

Developed by Dr. Dan Siegel, interpersonal neurobiology is a field of study that looks to identify the similar patterns that arise from separate approaches to knowledge. Interpersonal neurobiology combines research from multiple areas into a framework that examines the common findings in an effort to understand human experience. Anthropology, Biology, computer science, linguistics, math, physics, psychology and psychiatry all contribute to Dr. Siegel’s interpersonal neurobiology theory. Therapists applying IPNB principles typically take a mindfulness approach to treatment that promotes compassion, kindness, resilience, and well-being in the client’s personal life, relationships, and community. Think this approach might work for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s interpersonal neurobiology specialists today.

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Meet the specialists

 

I've taken Dr. Dan Seigel's comprehensive course on Interpersonal Neurobiology (IPNB). IPNB is a framework that looks across multiple disciplines that study the mind, brain & relationships, & how all three of these interact to shape who we are, & then how to promote optimal well-being – including non-judgmental insight into yourself, and acceptance, empathy, kindness, compassion & freedom for self & others.

— Brian La Roy Jones, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Walnut Creek, CA

Interpersonal Neurobiology is designed to help people understand their emotions and general life functioning within the context of multiple professional disciplines. IPNB psychotherapy involves integrating knowledge from disciplines as diverse as computer science, sociology, anthropology, linguistics, mental health and several others. Each discipline contributes a unique set of knowledge that help us live an integrative and fulfilling life.

— John Edwards, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oakland, CA
 

My goal is to promote compassion, kindness, resilience, and well-being in our personal lives, our relationships, and our communities. In an individual’s mind, integration involves the linkage of separate aspects of mental processes such as thought with feeling, bodily sensation with logic. In a relationship, integration entails each person’s being respected for his or her autonomy and differentiated self while at the same time being linked to others in empathic communication.

— Sonya DeWitt, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Spokane, WA

As an ardent yoga & meditation practitioner, I have understood the gravity of how important it is to do whatever I can to purify my own consciousness. However, given my own history of illness & abuse, I also realized that at some point, I cannot walk this path alone. We desperately need others to help us to regulate our nervous systems. Without these beings, both real & imaginal, without practicing often our connections to benevolent beings, we will not be able to heal, let alone thrive. Connect

— Jen-Mitsuke Peters, Mental Health Counselor in Denver, CO
 

As an ardent yoga & meditation practitioner, I understood the gravity of purifying my own consciousness. However, given my own history of illness & abuse, I also realized that at some point, I can't walk this path alone. We all desperately need others to help us to regulate our nervous systems. Without practicing our connections to benevolent beings, real & imaginal, we will not be able to heal, let alone thrive. Connection is absolutely essential, but access to it is not obvious...

— Jen-Mitsuke Peters, Mental Health Counselor in Denver, CO

I have studied IPNB since 2006 and have integrated the information from many different teachers. I believe that the understanding and insight from IPNB helps to bring compassion into many situations that may have been seen through the lens of shame.

— Karen Lucas, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

I have studied IPNB since 2006 and have integrated the information from many different teachers. I believe that the understanding and insight from IPNB helps to bring compassion to many situations that may have been seen through the lens of shame.

— Karen Lucas, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

The IPNB approach explores how energy and information flows both within and between a person's brain, body and inner and outer connections. I find it gives an overall understanding of what might be going on for an individual and how best to therapeutically help lesson disturbing symptoms and improve functioning and happiness. I discuss with my clients ways to understand what might be going on for them and how, as a team, we can find ways towards therapeutic change.

— Rebecca Lencz, Counselor in Towson, MD

Much of what we think of as mental or psychological pain is related to the regulation/dysregulation of our nervous systems. For our nervous systems to regulate with ease, we need to have and have had co-regulation with a regulated other. The regulation of your primary-caregivers during childhood and primary relationships in adulthood enormously impact your ability to “self”-regulate. I can help you work with the wisdom of your nervous system while providing you with a co-regulating space.

— Sarah Argueta, Therapist
 

Interpersonal Neurobiology explains how reparative relationships have the power to heal relational trauma. We're ultimately who we are because of our relationships. The most intimate ones, with primary caregivers or romantic partners, literally shape our brain. We used to think early experiences defined us, but now we know our brain in constantly being reshaped by new relationships. Therapy can change our brain's response to fear & threat, offering hope & healing to CPTSD survivors.

— Smadar Salzman, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

Interpersonal Neurobiology is the interdisciplinary study of how our experiences literally shape our brains. I have an extensive background in developmental psychology, including undergraduate coursework in lifespan development, cognitive science, and social & affective neuroscience, and a master's in human development & psychology from Harvard University. I continue my education through self-study, and have read most of books including in the Norton series on Interpersonal Neurobiology.

— Erin Kennedy, Associate Professional Clinical Counselor in Carlsbad, CA
 

I have a Ph.D. in Neuroscience which gives me a deep understanding of how our brains work. Interpersonal Neurobiology starts with the understanding that our experiences shape our brain, our thoughts, and our perceptions of ourselves, others and our world. But just as trauma and other negative experiences can create patterns that lead to anxiety, depression, anger, unhealthy relationships, addictions, etc...new experiences, ideas and behaviors can change those patterns by changing our brain.

— Anna Scully, Psychologist

Interpersonal Neurobiology takes into account the functions of our brain, nervous system, and our emotional states to help make all these parts of ourselves work together. Having our parts work together creates a healthy, dynamic, and hopeful approach to our relationships. When we feel integrated, we feel like ourselves in our jobs, our family, our creative pursuits, and really, every part of our life.

— Erica Randolph, Counselor in Tucson, AZ
 

Experiencing upsetting life events can affect the ways our brains and nervous systems operate. I teach my clients this to reduce the shame that may be associated with their behaviors and help them to begin to feel safe within themselves and with others to begin taking the steps toward healing and growth.

— Wendy Llamas, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brea, CA

I strongly believe that each person in the relationship is a rich source of information, and it is well known that within us all are innate neurological systems that signal to us safety or danger within relationships. Attuning to these systems, in ourselves, in one another, and within the relationship, often elicits lasting healing. Thus, you will find me watching what is happening between us quite closely as a means toward therapeutic intervention and change.

— Chris Perry, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Sammamish, WA