Attachment

Attachment issues, or attachment disorders, are broad terms used to describe issues resulting from a failure to form normal attachments to primary caregivers in early childhood. Most children with attachment disorders have had severe problems or difficulties in their early relationships (they may have been neglected or physically or emotionally abused). One specific attachment disorder is Reactive attachment disorder (RAD), a condition typically found in children who have received grossly negligent care and do not form a healthy emotional attachment with their primary caregivers (usually their mothers) before age 5. A mental health professional who specializes in attachment issues can be a great help to both the child and the caregiver affected. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today!

Meet the specialists

A lot of people experience trauma within their family of origin. I work with developmental (also known as complex) and attachment (ways of learning how to emotionally bond) trauma which includes growing up in alcoholism, abuse, conflict, parent death and/or any traumatic experience endured during childhood. As a result, a lot of people develop a type of insecure attachment that impacts their current relationships (i.e. dependency, fear, conflict, anxiety).

— Natalie Stemati, Psychologist in Denver, CO
 

In my work with childhood issues; much of what I've seen throughout treatment leads me back to a rupture of attachment with a primary caregiver. I am passionate about learning more about infant/toddler mental health; serving those who would like to heal broken familial connections.

— Brittney George, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA

In my work with childhood issues; much of what I've seen throughout treatment leads me back to a rupture of attachment with a primary caregiver. I am passionate about learning more about infant/toddler mental health; serving those who would like to heal broken familial connections.

— Brittney George, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA
 

It is my belief that attachment style formulates from childhood and can be influenced and repaired well into our senior years. Creating a consistent trusting safe haven space for a client to experience a new way of being in relationship is critical. Additionally, I have participated in specific Somatic training to work with the younger physiology underneath a client's attachment style first versus from the cognitive brain. This has the potential to create longer lasting results.

— Vanessa Tate, Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO

Attachment issues concern “something that happened” or “something that failed to happen” between child and parent. Children with attachment wounds can become adults who struggle to relate in healthy ways to themselves and to others. They scrabble for safety in relationships and behave in ways that reflect this. In therapy clients with attachment wounds develop more wholesome relationships with parts of them that were ridiculed and belittled or other parts that didn't get their needs met.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

Our most early relationships shape us. How our needs are met, or not, leave an imprint on our sense of self on a deep, non-verbal level. Our attachment styles are formed by 5 years of age, and we develop core survival strategies to get our needs met in relationships, at the expense of oneself. Therapy can help you heal your relationship with yourself, and reimagine how you'd like to be in relationship with those most important to you.

— Kim Torrence, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Rockville, MD

When addressing issues around attachment its important for clients to explore their attachment style as a child and how they were or weren't able to get certain needs met growing up. Once we have explored their past dynamics. I then psychoeducate my clients on the ways these connections lead to the attachment styles we display as adults. Once this has taken place then we can work on utilizing cognitive tools to reframe their neural networks to build healthier relationships moving forward.

— Jaleesa Black, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

I've worked for the past 8 years with clients on Attachment issues and how it affects their relationships. I've also done extensive therapy for my own attachment issues and taken several CEUs on attachment work.

— Anne Crawford, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX

Working from an attachment framework means I have a deep understanding of how our early caregiver connections affected our ability to soothe ourselves, to ask for help when we need it and to connect with ourselves and others. These early attachments can show up in our adult life even if we are not yet conscious of it. While many of us were hurt by not receiving the love and nurturance we deserved as little ones, we also heal in loving supportive authentic relationships. These are possible.

— Megan Satterfield, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Austin, TX
 

Ideally, we would all grow up in a delightfully safe and warm environment, with caregivers perfectly attuned to our every need and supporting us every step of the way. Most of us do not experience this perfection, and that is totally ok. Without placing blame on your caregivers, we will identify the attachment experiences that were lacking for you and heal what was lost. Attachment therapy can help deepen your relationships, give you stronger emotional regulation skills, and spark your inner joy

— Laura Stephan, Psychologist