Attachment

Attachment issues, or attachment disorders, are broad terms used to describe issues resulting from a failure to form normal attachments to primary caregivers in early childhood. Most children with attachment disorders have had severe problems or difficulties in their early relationships (they may have been neglected or physically or emotionally abused). One specific attachment disorder is Reactive attachment disorder (RAD), a condition typically found in children who have received grossly negligent care and do not form a healthy emotional attachment with their primary caregivers (usually their mothers) before age 5. A mental health professional who specializes in attachment issues can be a great help to both the child and the caregiver affected. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today!

Meet the specialists

Attachment issues concern “something that happened” or “something that failed to happen” between child and parent. Children with attachment wounds can become adults who struggle to relate in healthy ways to themselves and to others. They scrabble for safety in relationships and behave in ways that reflect this. In therapy clients with attachment wounds develop more wholesome relationships with parts of them that were ridiculed and belittled or other parts that didn't get their needs met.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

In my work with childhood issues; much of what I've seen throughout treatment leads me back to a rupture of attachment with a primary caregiver. I am passionate about learning more about infant/toddler mental health; serving those who would like to heal broken familial connections.

— Brittney George, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA

I've worked for the past 8 years with clients on Attachment issues and how it affects their relationships. I've also done extensive therapy for my own attachment issues and taken several CEUs on attachment work.

— Anne Crawford, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX
 

In my work with childhood issues; much of what I've seen throughout treatment leads me back to a rupture of attachment with a primary caregiver. I am passionate about learning more about infant/toddler mental health; serving those who would like to heal broken familial connections.

— Brittney George, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA

It is my belief that attachment style formulates from childhood and can be influenced and repaired well into our senior years. Creating a consistent trusting safe haven space for a client to experience a new way of being in relationship is critical. Additionally, I have participated in specific Somatic training to work with the younger physiology underneath a client's attachment style first versus from the cognitive brain. This has the potential to create longer lasting results.

— Vanessa Tate, Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO
 

I focus on how we learned to attach to others throughout our lives. What lesson's did we learn about trust? What emotions were accepted and which were rejected? I have seen how learning about how we connected with others from a very young age teaches us about how we connect with others now. When we explore these learned reactions we can relearn our relationships and be more compassionate with ourselves in our own journeys to connect with others.

— Stephanie Boulton, Counselor in Broomfield, CO

Relationships are such an important part of our lives. It is critical in developing healthy relationships to understand our attachment styles and how we can overcome the challenges of it. Through exploring family history, patterns and relationships, clients can find their way to being the best child, parent, friend or partner.

— Britney Watson, Counselor in Austin, TX
 

Attachment therapy is another love of mine. I recognize that most adult problems are a result of some form of neglect in childhood. As a result, I have sought training therplay that works to support children in developing healthy attachments with their caregivers. I find that this form of treatment works well with adults as well. I have utilized this form of treatment with my clients for over 3 years and find it to be very successful especially with children in foster/adoption.

— Silva Sheklanian, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Clovis, CA

The crux of all of the work that I do includes an attachment-based tenet.

— Chris Burner, Clinical Social Worker in Durham, NC
 

I take an interpersonal lens when working with clients in order to understand how we relate to others. I believe humans are social creatures (even if we don't want to be) that were socialized through our caregivers, taking those lessons with us into our present. I find it beneficial to look at interpersonal dynamics to help inform treatment. I've worked within the couples framework, as well as invididual's sessions to take a closer look at our insight in how we attach to others.

— Megan Marshall, Counselor in Corvallis, OR

Attachment refers to how we relate to others. These patterns, of both behavior & thought were needed for us to adapt to our family, to connect & feel safe with our parents. Although these patterns were helpful growing up, as we get older, these very same patterns may be creating unhealthy relationships with others. This is why we feel the same thing keeps happening in our relationships. The good news is that creating new patterns fosters the healthy relationships we want and deserve.

— Christianne Porta, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Tampa, FL
 

Attachment is the basis of how we connect to other people. If you are having difficulties creating and maintaining healthy relationship with others or even yourself, the attachment style you developed could be interfering. The good news is that attachment styles can be changed with a bit of work.

— Charice Corbin, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Northport, AL

How well we connect with others determines how lonely we feel in life. Working with clients in high school and with adults in the hospital, I have helped many people find a more secure way of connecting with others and trusting loved ones in appropriate ways.

— Joshua Swanson, Counselor in St. Paul, MN
 

I love looking deeply at human connections and I am drawn to understanding, uncovering and exploring our earliest connections on earth - our attachments to our parents and other loved ones. These early attachment create templates we use in all relationships moving forward and sometimes we need to do some healing on our templates in order for us to love and be loved to the best of our abilities.

— Margie Slater, Clinical Psychologist in Encino, CA

A specialty of mine is working with adoptees and foster youth to work through their grief, loss, and trauma and grow meaningful relationships. I also help parents and caregivers to foster youth and adoptees learn how to make their home trauma informed to help establish stronger relationships with their children and help them thrive.

— Amy Wilkerson, Clinical Social Worker in ,
 

I help participants gain and explore their relational awareness as well as form a more secure attachment through consistency and safety built over time and felt in our alliance.

— Ariana Chemtob, Psychotherapist in New York, NY

Attachment issues concern “something that happened” or “something that failed to happen” between child and parent. Children with attachment wounds can become adults who struggle to relate in healthy ways to themselves and to others. They scrabble for safety in relationships and behave in ways that reflect this. In therapy clients with attachment wounds develop more wholesome relationships with parts of them that were ridiculed and belittled or other parts that didn't get their needs met.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA