Attachment

Attachment issues, or attachment disorders, are broad terms used to describe issues resulting from a failure to form normal attachments to primary caregivers in early childhood. Most children with attachment disorders have had severe problems or difficulties in their early relationships (they may have been neglected or physically or emotionally abused). One specific attachment disorder is Reactive attachment disorder (RAD), a condition typically found in children who have received grossly negligent care and do not form a healthy emotional attachment with their primary caregivers (usually their mothers) before age 5. A mental health professional who specializes in attachment issues can be a great help to both the child and the caregiver affected. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today!

Meet the specialists

It is my belief that attachment style formulates from childhood and can be influenced and repaired well into our senior years. Creating a consistent trusting safe haven space for a client to experience a new way of being in relationship is critical. Additionally, I have participated in specific Somatic training to work with the younger physiology underneath a client's attachment style first versus from the cognitive brain. This has the potential to create longer lasting results.

— Vanessa Tate, Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO
 

Experiencing unreliable caregiving as a young child can set one up for feelings of insecurity and a lack of stability in interpersonal relationships. My training and approach focuses heavily on how my patients' current relationships are replaying old patterns and hurts, keeping them stuck and unsatisfied. Our work sets out to provide them with a healthier model of relating so that they can more compassionately understand themselves and others, and find the connections they've longed for.

— Eileen Brown, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Rafael, CA

Relationships are our source of positive connection but also disappointment and pain. The ways you struggle with trust, forgiveness (of yourself and others), loneliness and care-giving are all related to the kind of attachment you seek and provide in your relationships. Templates for relationship are deeply affected by early experiences but are also shaped over your entire life. Shifting old patterns to build and sustain deeper relationships is crucial to feeling satisfied and whole.

— Jennie Merovick, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Oakland, CA
 

Relationships are our source of positive connection but also disappointment and pain. The ways you struggle with trust, forgiveness (of yourself and others), loneliness and care-giving are all related to the kind of attachment you seek and provide in your relationships. Templates for relationship are deeply affected by early experiences but are also shaped over your entire life. Shifting old patterns to build and sustain deeper relationships is crucial to feeling satisfied and whole.

— Jennie Merovick, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Oakland, CA
 

Healing attachment wounds is an important part of healing. Understanding and building new experiences of attachment in session can help improve your relationships with others and pave the way towards getting your deepest needs met.

— Jessica Improta, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Santa Monica, CA

A secure emotional bond with a trusted other is an insurance policy against life's ups and downs -- it doesn't make the challenges of life disappear, but it can help you feel supported, cared about, and buoyed to handle life's vicissitudes. In attachment-based therapy, the relationship between client and therapist is an object of focus, exploration, curiosity, and interest. As this emotional bond becomes stronger, clients find they have more confidence, courage, and resilience. They themselves then become a more secure attachment figure for others, bringing more satisfaction to their relationships, both inner and outer.

— Jennifer Wohl, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I am trained in AEDP, which is a modality informed by attachment theory and brain science that harnesses the power of the therapeutic relationship to undo aloneness and create lasting transformation for clients.

— Carolyn Moore, Counselor in San Francisco, CA
 

If you ever had the feeling you were not good enough for your family, I can help you address the negative feelings that are occurring within you.

— Mary Nashed, Counselor in Chapel Hill, NC

Who we are as adults including our strengths and struggles are highly influenced by the primary people in our lives growing up: parents, caregivers, siblings and others who may have been significant in some way. Both the presence and absence of these people leave imprints that we carry with us knowingly and unknowingly throughout our lives. Attachment is relevant for all therapy issues because it informs aspects of why individuals think and act the way they do. I incorporate exploration of attachment to help people gain insights, decrease their struggles, and improve their lives.

— Jami Howell, Psychologist in Portland, OR
 

If you ever had the feeling you were not good enough for your family, I can help you address the negative feelings that are occurring within you. Overcoming the feelings of rejection you experienced as a child can be a hurtful journey but I will guide every step of the way until you no longer feel rejected.

— Mary Nashed, Counselor in Chapel Hill, NC

Do you struggle to make and maintain satisfying relationships? Do you feel like, despite your best efforts, you end up pushing people away? Do you have a difficult time trusting others? Do you wish you were closer to people? These questions all relate to issues of attachment. Each person develops a style of relating to others based on their early attachment relationships with their caregivers. Therapy can help you explore your own style and try on new ways of relating.

— Jennifer Newbloom, Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

We all live in relation to others and the world around us, attachment plays a big role in how we interact in the world around us. Our early attachments set up a road map for us about what relationships are, feel like and should be; good, bad, or nutty these road maps impact our current relationships to varying degrees. If your road map has too many pot holes or detours we can find alternate routes that fit your current life and the relationships you want to have.

— Lynda Martin, Counselor in New York, NY
 

Difficulty or preoccupation with relationships may indicate that your attachment style is less than optimal. Examining the patterns of your feelings about the people in your life can offer powerful insights and suggest tactics and strategies to gain more satisfaction and warmth from your social environment. The poet Robert Burns said, "O wad some Power the giftie gie us To see oursels as ithers see us!" English: Oh would some power the gift give us, To see ourselves as other see us!

— Tony Filanowski, Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY

If your someone who is struggling in your current relationships or even with parenting due to an upbringing with less than ideal parents then I can help you feel more confident and comfortable in your role. I provide a safe and nurturing space for you to learn new skills and be the best that you can be.

— Jessica Lang, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Albany, CA
 

I have interest and expertise in early experiences with attachment figures and how these inform adult relationships.

— Lisa Valentine, Psychiatrist in Bellaire, TX