Dissociative Disorders

Dissociative disorders (DD) are mental conditions characterized by disturbances or breakdowns of memory, awareness, identity, or perception. Typically, dissociative disorders occur as a coping mechanism for the brain to deal with a situation too upsetting for the conscious mind to process. Dissociative disorders are thought to be primarily caused by trauma or abuse, causing the individual to escape reality in involuntary and pathological ways. They can also be caused by things like stress or substance abuse. There are three main types of dissociative disorders: 1. dissociative amnesia and/or fugue: selective amnesia of a specific time, person or event. 2. Dissociative identity disorder: an indistinct or distorted sense of identity. 3. Depersonalization disorder: a feeling of being detached from yourself. If you think you may be suffering from a dissociative disorder, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today.

Meet the specialists

I have experience with, and passion for working with people who struggle with dissociation including Dissociative Amnesia, Depersonalization / Derealization, OSDD, and Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID). https://praxisthriving.com/dissociation

— Kristen Henshaw, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX
 

I work with people who may experience derealization, depersonalization, and/or don't feel connected to body, space, and/or time. Dissociation is a spectrum that ranges from very mild symptoms through to forms of dissociative identify disorder. The important thing to know is this is what we humans do, you're not crazy! Some of us may need more help to feel grounded and/or present. Incorporated practices of trauma informed yoga, mindfulness can help us gently reconnect.

— Teresa Petersen, Clinical Social Worker in Houston, TX

Our remarkable nervous systems provide us with multiple ways to survive overwhelming experiences by disconnecting from our emotions, bodies, surroundings, thoughts, or actions. When this occurs during childhood it can lead to the cutting off of memories and parts of self from the presenting self. This can lead to a dissociative disorder marked by persistent zoning out, emotions that come out of nowhere, and critical or even cruel thoughts towards the self. Dissociation is highly treatable.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

Our remarkable nervous systems provide us with multiple ways to survive overwhelming experiences by disconnecting from our emotions, bodies, surroundings, thoughts, or actions. When this occurs during childhood it can lead to the cutting off of memories and parts of self from the presenting self. This can lead to a dissociative disorder marked by persistent zoning out, emotions that come out of nowhere, and critical or even cruel thoughts towards the self. Dissociation is highly treatable.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA

Dissociative disorders, including DID, are at times hotly debated, even amongst mental health professionals. I have experience working with clients who have been diagnosed with DID, and you can expect empathy, support, understanding, and an approach that is tailored to you and not a blanket approach to your diagnosis.

— Fiona Crounin, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Round Rock, TX
 

Our remarkable nervous systems provide us with multiple ways to survive overwhelming experiences by disconnecting from our emotions, bodies, surroundings, thoughts, or actions. When this occurs during childhood it can lead to the cutting off of memories and parts of self from the presenting self. This can lead to a dissociative disorder marked by persistent zoning out, emotions that come out of nowhere, and critical or even cruel thoughts towards the self. Dissociation is highly treatable.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA

Our remarkable nervous systems provide us with multiple ways to survive overwhelming experiences by disconnecting from our emotions, bodies, surroundings, thoughts, or actions. When this occurs during childhood it can lead to the cutting off of memories and parts of self from the rest of oneself. This can lead to a dissociative disorder marked by persistent zoning out, emotions that come out of nowhere, and critical or even cruel thoughts towards the self. Dissociation is highly treatable.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA

Providing a safe therapeutic space and attentive listening, I use an integration of EMDR, structural dissociation theory, and ego state therapy/"parts work" to help heal the effects of long-term trauma. I have been receiving advanced training since 2018 with ongoing consultation and education.

— Kathryn Gelinas, Licensed Professional Counselor in Waterbury, CT
 

I have attended multiple trainings on working with dissociative disorders and participate in an ongoing consultation group for therapists working with dissociative disorders. I have worked with individuals with symptoms of derealization and depersonalization and I have treated multiple people who have Dissociative Identity Disorder.

— Stephanie Holtgrefe, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in West Chester, OH

The thing about dissociative disorders is that they hide, so it is likely that you may come to see me for depression or anxiety, and when we meet, you might have been previously diagnosed and treated for all kinds of disorders. It's okay, we will figure it out. It takes a lot of time and perseverance, but the worst is behind you.

— Chelle Epstein, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Miami, FL
 

Trauma can have lasting effects on our brains. If you have every felt like you were having an outer body experience or that you are not connected to your body as you once were, you are not alone. As someone who has experience with this first hand and as a clinician it would be my honor to help you on your journey.

— Jason Ducos, Clinical Social Worker in ,

I have had specialized training, supervision, consultation, and experience with treating dissociative disorders. Part of my training and supervision was with a renowned expert in the field of trauma and dissociation.

— Paula Zepke, Licensed Professional Counselor in Middletown, CT
 

I have training integrating Ego State Therapy and EMDR to help relieve symptoms of dissociation at the clients pace. An important factor in treating dissociation is to identify the symptoms of dissociation and develop an understanding of how past experiences may be contributing to the current distress.

— Sara Galindo, Clinical Social Worker in Texas,

One of my main areas of passion is working through dissociation with clients and with EMDR consultees or supervisees- this is an often-ignored and stigmatized, albeit natural, side-effect of profound trauma. I help clinicians learn to work with so many dissociative presentations, and I help clients feel empowered by the system of coping they have naturally put in place in response to their trauma. Together, we learn how to make it work for clients, rather than trying to make it stop happening!

— Rebecca Toner, Counselor in Southington, CT
 

I have completed training with Kathleen Martin LCSW using EMDR and Structural Dissociation Theory. In learning about trauma and working with clients who have trauma I also have experience working with dissociation. While we all experience some dissociation, using this coping skill often can have its disadvantages. I believe in the integration of of the self. We can decide if we are a good fit.

— Annia Salas, Licensed Professional Counselor

Trauma can have lasting effects on our brains. If you have every felt like you were having an outer body experience or that you are not connected to your body as you once were, you are not alone. A person's history with trauma, fear and anxiety play a big role in how we view the world. I know how scary it is to open up about past traumas. As someone who has experience with this first hand and as a clinician it would be my honor to help you on your journey.

— Jason Ducos, Clinical Social Worker in ,
 

Dissociation can manifest in a variety of ways, all of which can feel disconcerting and overwhelming. I have extensive training and experience in working with individuals who feel 'outside themselves' and not fully apart of their day to day lives.

— Morgan Grace, Psychotherapist in Austin, TX

Dissociation is an incredible skill that helps a person survive horrible things. It's time to come back into your body and move past the things that happened.

— Seal Dwyer, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in St. Cloud, MN
 

Currently I receive supervision on working with clients with DID, and other dissociative symptoms. I work to assist the invidual in coping and grounding and decrease in crisis responses.

— Carly Wolfram, Counselor in Buffalo Grove, IL