Dissociative Disorders

Dissociative disorders (DD) are mental conditions characterized by disturbances or breakdowns of memory, awareness, identity, or perception. Typically, dissociative disorders occur as a coping mechanism for the brain to deal with a situation too upsetting for the conscious mind to process. Dissociative disorders are thought to be primarily caused by trauma or abuse, causing the individual to escape reality in involuntary and pathological ways. They can also be caused by things like stress or substance abuse. There are three main types of dissociative disorders: 1. dissociative amnesia and/or fugue: selective amnesia of a specific time, person or event. 2. Dissociative identity disorder: an indistinct or distorted sense of identity. 3. Depersonalization disorder: a feeling of being detached from yourself. If you think you may be suffering from a dissociative disorder, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today.

Meet the specialists

I work with people who may experience derealization, depersonalization, and/or don't feel connected to body, space, and/or time. Dissociation is a spectrum that ranges from very mild symptoms through to forms of dissociative identify disorder. The important thing to know is this is what we humans do, you're not crazy! Some of us may need more help to feel grounded and/or present. Incorporated practices of trauma informed yoga, mindfulness can help us gently reconnect.

— Teresa Petersen, Clinical Social Worker in Houston, TX
 

Our remarkable nervous systems provide us with multiple ways to survive overwhelming experiences by disconnecting from our emotions, bodies, surroundings, thoughts, or actions. When this occurs during childhood it can lead to the cutting off of memories and parts of self from the presenting self. This can lead to a dissociative disorder marked by persistent zoning out, emotions that come out of nowhere, and critical or even cruel thoughts towards the self. Dissociation is highly treatable.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA

Our remarkable nervous systems provide us with multiple ways to survive overwhelming experiences by disconnecting from our emotions, bodies, surroundings, thoughts, or actions. When this occurs during childhood it can lead to the cutting off of memories and parts of self from the presenting self. This can lead to a dissociative disorder marked by persistent zoning out, emotions that come out of nowhere, and critical or even cruel thoughts towards the self. Dissociation is highly treatable.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

Our remarkable nervous systems provide us with multiple ways to survive overwhelming experiences by disconnecting from our emotions, bodies, surroundings, thoughts, or actions. When this occurs during childhood it can lead to the cutting off of memories and parts of self from the rest of oneself. This can lead to a dissociative disorder marked by persistent zoning out, emotions that come out of nowhere, and critical or even cruel thoughts towards the self. Dissociation is highly treatable.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA

Our remarkable nervous systems provide us with multiple ways to survive overwhelming experiences by disconnecting from our emotions, bodies, surroundings, thoughts, or actions. When this occurs during childhood it can lead to the cutting off of memories and parts of self from the presenting self. This can lead to a dissociative disorder marked by persistent zoning out, emotions that come out of nowhere, and critical or even cruel thoughts towards the self. Dissociation is highly treatable.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

Dissociative disorders, including DID, are at times hotly debated, even amongst mental health professionals. I have experience working with clients who have been diagnosed with DID, and you can expect empathy, support, understanding, and an approach that is tailored to you and not a blanket approach to your diagnosis.

— Fiona Crounin, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Round Rock, TX
 

I utilize ego state therapy to work with dissociation in order to help create a sense of internal cooperation and wholeness.

— Alexandra Solomon, Clinical Social Worker in Glastonbury, CT

Trauma can have lasting effects on our brains. If you have every felt like you were having an outer body experience or that you are not connected to your body as you once were, you are not alone. As someone who has experience with this first hand and as a clinician it would be my honor to help you on your journey.

— Jason Ducos, Clinical Social Worker in ,
 

I work with people who may experience derealization, depersonalization, and/or don't feel connected to body, space, and/or time. Dissociation is a spectrum that ranges from very mild symptoms through to forms of dissociative identify disorder. The important thing to know is this is what we humans do, you're not crazy! Some of us may need more help to feel grounded and/or present. Incorporated practices of trauma informed yoga, mindfulness can help us gently reconnect.

— Teresa Petersen, Clinical Social Worker in Houston, TX

I have had extensive trauma trainings in multiple modalities and have the skills to help clients deal with all levels of dissociative symptoms. I regularly receive consultation from a more experienced EMDR therapist to insure that I am providing safe and effective treatment for my dissociative clients.

— Michelle Raine, Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

Trauma can have lasting effects on our brains. If you have every felt like you were having an outer body experience or that you are not connected to your body as you once were, you are not alone. Our history with trauma and fear play a big role in how we view the world. I know how scary it is to open up about past traumas. As someone who has experience with this first hand and as a clinician it would be my honor to help you on your journey.

— Jason Ducos, Clinical Social Worker in ,

As a Certified Clinical Trauma Professional, my focus is on working with dissociative disorders, including Dissociative Identity Disorder (formerly called "multiple personality disorder"). In this work, you and I will focus on decreasing the effects of the dissociation on your present day life rather than on remembering the details of the traumatic events, which could be re-traumatizing. We can't change the past, but we CAN change how it affects you now.

— Alicia Polk, Licensed Professional Counselor in Belton, MO
 

It's natural and adaptive to avoid pain, but if we deal with it separately for too long we can lose touch with who we are. What was once a highly adaptive, life -saving strategy becomes a secret prison of shame and doubt. It's easy to get lost in the many faces that were created to survive. I see you and look forward to being a safe place for you to find peace, clarity and wholeness.

— Kerry Ogden, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

I have a strong background in childhood trauma and advanced training and experience in the treatment of dissociative spectrum disorders. I deeply honor persons who have had to struggle with dissociation, and I have years of experience to benefit you.

— Dr. Jill Klingler, Psychologist in Cincinnati, OH
 

Being embodied allows us to experience all of our emotions, and tap into our holistic intelligence, in a way that brings out the best in us. Yet, many who grew up in abusive and neglectful homes learned the only way to protect themselves was to leave this crucial, vital awareness behind. We also live in a society that encourages intellectualization, robbing us of our heart-felt humanity. I work somatically to address this, getting clients out of the "talking chair" and engaging their whole self.

— Inga Larson, Counselor in Denver, CO

The dissociative spectrum is broad and goes all the way from being "in the zone" to Dissociative Identity Disorder. Dissociation is a natural phenomenon and we all do it to a degree. For some of us, this natural protection kicks in so much that it begins to disorder our lives. By combining trauma-informed theory with IFS techniques, I am able to help clients normalize the dissociation process and gently gain more control over their experience by healing their emotional parts.

— Lara Dubowchik, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Highland Park, NJ
 

Trauma can have lasting effects on our brains. If you have every felt like you were having an outer body experience or that you are not connected to your body as you once were, you are not alone. As someone who has experience with this first hand and as a clinician it would be my honor to help you on your journey.

— Jason Ducos, Clinical Social Worker in ,

I am certified in trauma model therapy, which is focused on those who experience dissociation.

— Morenike Olorunnisomo, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Grapevine, TX