Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition that's triggered by a traumatic, scary or dangerous event. PTSD can be caused by either witnessing or experiencing the trauma. Events that sometimes trigger PTSD include everything from sexual assault, war, and violence, to car accidents or other incidents that could cause loss of life. It is not at all uncommon for people who go through something traumatic to have temporary difficulty coping and acute symptoms, but with time, they usually get better. However, if the symptoms last longer than a month, get worse rather than better and affect your ability to function, you may be suffering from PTSD. Symptoms of PTSD may include severe anxiety, anger, nightmares, trouble sleeping, flashbacks to the event, frightening thoughts, avoidance of situations or places, feeling on edge and/or being easily startled. If you think you may be experiencing PTSD, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s specialists today to get help.

Meet the specialists

Find out more about how I can help you with trauma via my specialty webpage: https://www.timholtzmantherapy.com/emdr-trauma-therapy

— Tim Holtzman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Berkeley, CA
 

Our team has extensive specialized training in PTSD, Complex Trauma, and Dissociation.

— Stacy Ruse (Founder), Licensed Professional Counselor in Longmont, CO

I work alongside survivors of trauma and abuse frequently in my practice of therapy. I use a trauma-focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy lens and Narrative Therapy in order to help you re-story your experience.

— Sprout Therapy PDX, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

My special therapeutic focus is helping people who are rebuilding their sense of self or their family relationships after disorienting experiences. I treat both simple trauma, such as an accident, and complex trauma resulting from multiple traumatic experiences. I also have specialized training in working with dissociative disorders.

— Kaye-Ailsa Rowan, Marriage & Family Therapist in San Jose, CA

What's Developmental Trauma Disorder? It refers to adversity that impacted development in childhood. Traumatic stress concerns something that happened or something that failed to happen. Children who grow up with misattuned parents can become adults who struggle to relate in healthy ways to themselves and others. These adults often struggle to feel safe in relationships and behave in ways that reflect this. Together, we'll develop a wholesome relationship with yourself and then with others.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

I aim to help you build understanding of the impacts of trauma and gain new skills and strategies for coping or managing your symptoms. With this guidance and support, you can start to feel more capable and empowered and begin to recognize your own potential for recovery.

— Melanie Lopes, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

Trauma is tough, but also unsettlingly common in the general population. Most people never attend to it as it's always very difficult. And simultaneously it is not noticed as it hides behind dissociative triggers or is normalized if we've been living with it for too long. There are specific techniques that can help people access unprocessed trauma and successfully attend to them as it's the only way to be set free of them. It isn't easy work but crucial for a healthy mind and body.

— Paris Obdan, Psychotherapist in Boulder, CO
 

I have specific training in working with trauma, whether it is a one time trauma, or ongoing childhood trauma (i.e., abuse, neglect, etc.).

— Sara Rotger, Marriage & Family Therapist in Montrose, CA

My graduate program and the majority of my clinical work has been focused on helping people understand and overcome traumatic experiences and histories.

— Sarah McCune, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Denver, CO
 

I work with people who experience PTSD, or more often have Complex PTSD stemming from adverse childhood experiences, sexual abuse, developmental trauma and/or childhood abuse/neglect. Some clients are medical professionals, first responders or veteran's who have experienced overseas conflict. I use a trauma informed approach, build a strong therapeutic relationship and provide skills to help you manage symptoms, to prepare and feel more confident in addressing what happened to you.

— Teresa Petersen, Clinical Social Worker in Houston, TX

In traditional psychotherapy, there is an emphasis on putting language to thoughts. However, for someone with trauma, these thoughts are too painful to think about, much less express in words. By integrating the somatic dimension, my clients can build an awareness of how physical symptoms relate to their beliefs and emotions. This reconnection of the cognitive, emotional, and physical elements of our being allows us to be truly engaged with the present and no longer hindered by the past.

— Thomas Meade, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

In traditional psychotherapy, there is an emphasis on putting language to thoughts. However, for someone with trauma, these thoughts are too painful to think about, much less express in words. By integrating the somatic dimension, my clients can build an awareness of how physical symptoms relate to their beliefs and emotions. This reconnection of the cognitive, emotional, and physical elements of our being allows us to be truly engaged with the present and no longer hindered by the past.

— Thomas Meade, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

I have attended multiple trainings over the last 8 years of practicing that focus on trauma and PTSD. I have also worked in the crisis response field. I continue to stay up to date through attending trainings and reading about trauma in my free time.

— Jinger Moore, Licensed Professional Counselor in Twinsburg, OH
 

Often times, people who have experienced trauma don't present with concerns that exactly fit with PTSD. Especially for people who have experienced chronic and persistent trauma, coming to therapy often means addressing situational and/or life stressors first, before being able to look at some of the underlying experiences of trauma that have exacerbated those stressors. And, there are those instances where one or more very specific and identifiable traumatic events have resulted in PTSD. When people see me as a result of this type of trauma, we'll initially work at ensuring there is safety both inside and outside of the therapy space, while also developing specific skills and strategies to manage the specific impact of the trauma(s) experienced.

— Jeff Levy, Clinical Social Worker in Chicago, IL

My approach is always trauma informed and trauma centered. Whatever you present to therapy for help with, it is always impacted by what has come before. The work I do with people dives deep into their histories, identifies their painful experiences, and works to release this pain so they can move on. Clients end therapy with me feeling cleared of a lot of the weight they were bringing into their day to day lives. I am experienced with several exposure techniques for traumatic events.

— Rebecca Rondeau, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Merrimack, NH
 

I have had training in EMDR, TF-CBT, Somatic Experiencing, and CPT.

— Earnell McGhaney II, Licensed Professional Counselor in Sumter, SC

Surviving a life threatening event can open the eyes to a world never thought of before: one of constant dangers and threats surrounding you and your loved ones. This could be anything for anyone, but some examples are car accidents, threats of violence and being held at weapon point, physical or sexual assault, surviving medical emergencies or other major disaster. Together we can work together to relax the hypervigilance enough so you can enjoy the world with some peace.

— Timothy Kelly, Counselor in East Hanover, NJ
 

In 2012, I was trained in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), to provide evidence-based treatment for children and adolescents impacted by trauma and their parents or caregivers, followed by certification in 2014. In 2016, I became a Life is Good Playmaker, to further help children heal from the impact of early childhood trauma. In 2019, I continued training in treatment for trauma and stressors through completion of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR).

— Amy Emery, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in , CT

If you've experienced or witnessed a traumatic event, it can sometimes be hard to cope on your own. I can help you so you can be able to cope through this experience and move forward. I am certified in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and am trainined in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) Therapy.

— Rachelle Fong, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Waipahu, HI