Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition that's triggered by a traumatic, scary or dangerous event. PTSD can be caused by either witnessing or experiencing the trauma. Events that sometimes trigger PTSD include everything from sexual assault, war, and violence, to car accidents or other incidents that could cause loss of life. It is not at all uncommon for people who go through something traumatic to have temporary difficulty coping and acute symptoms, but with time, they usually get better. However, if the symptoms last longer than a month, get worse rather than better and affect your ability to function, you may be suffering from PTSD. Symptoms of PTSD may include severe anxiety, anger, nightmares, trouble sleeping, flashbacks to the event, frightening thoughts, avoidance of situations or places, feeling on edge and/or being easily startled. If you think you may be experiencing PTSD, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s specialists today to get help.

Meet the specialists

I believe treating PTSD must be holistic, intentional and inclusive. Through working extensively with this population I've learned that collaboration is also paramount. I think outside the box from an intersectional perspective to determine what might be most helpful set of interventions / treatments for the individual in front of me. Further, I work clinically to create a corrective emotional experience, where the client feels empowered and in control on their current decisions.

— Olivia Carollo, Clinical Psychologist in Chicago, IL
 

Trauma is tough, but also unsettlingly common in the general population. Most people never attend to it as it's always very difficult. And simultaneously it is not noticed as it hides behind dissociative triggers or is normalized if we've been living with it for too long. There are specific techniques that can help people access unprocessed trauma and successfully attend to them as it's the only way to be set free of them. It isn't easy work but crucial for a healthy mind and body.

— Paris Obdan, Psychotherapist in Boulder, CO

I am certified as a Clinical Trauma Professional. Traumatic and adverse childhood experiences are a source of symptoms that continue to affect us. Addressing the myriad ways these experiences are affecting your life and emotional well-being and finding alternatives, is very beneficial to becoming more comfortable and healthy in your life.

— Beth Darby, Clinical Social Worker in Brentwood, TN
 

What's Developmental Trauma Disorder? It refers to adversity that impacted development in childhood. Traumatic stress concerns “something that happened” or “something that failed to happen”. Children who grow up with misattuned parents can grow up to be adults who struggle to relate in healthy ways to themselves and to others. These adults often struggle to feel safe in relationships and behave in ways that reflect this. I'll help you develop a more wholesome relationship with yourself first.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA

PTSD for a long time was thought of as a condition that only military combat caused. That has changed. I have specialized in trauma, including PTSD, and my favorite treatment modalities are CBT & Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR).

— Dennis Smith, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Las Vegas, NV
 

Over 12 years of helping those heal who have experienced physical/emotional/sexual/psychological trauma/abuse. I have been trained in evidence-based treatments specifically for the treatment of PTSD.

— Amy Green, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Online, OR

I have worked with victims of crime in the past and have experience working with shock and complex trauma. As a participant of Somatic Experiencing, I have a focus on regulation and the nervous system after the experience of trauma.

— Dani Villalobos, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Clara, CA
 

Prior to embarking on my private practice journey, I worked for a nonprofit mental health clinic based out of the Center for Child and Family Health (www.ccfhnc.org) in NC which is an NCTSN (National Child Traumatic Stress Network) site. While there I gathered extensive knowledge and practice is working with family affected by sexual abuse, physical abuse, traumatic separation, neglect, adoption, child welfare involvement, death, and chronic illness.

— Halley M. Carmack, Clinical Social Worker in Delray Beach, FL

What's Developmental Trauma Disorder? It refers to adversity that impacted development in childhood. Traumatic stress concerns something that happened or something that failed to happen. Children who grow up with misattuned parents can become adults who struggle to relate in healthy ways to themselves and others. These adults often struggle to feel safe in relationships and behave in ways that reflect this. Together, we'll develop a wholesome relationship with yourself and then with others.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

I view PTSD as a much more complex label than simply PTSD. I work with gradients of traumatic experiences versus adults who have had a "shock trauma" or single incident. I treat adult clients who may have experienced repeated developmental attachment trauma during their early childhood. With my specialized Somatic training, I use an approach to treat the young physiology first and the adult cognition second.

— Vanessa Tate, Marriage & Family Therapist in Denver, CO

I am trained in Somatic Experiencing, Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), and Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT).

— Lina Návar, Psychotherapist in Austin, TX
 

I work alongside survivors of trauma and abuse frequently in my practice of therapy. I use a trauma-focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy lens and Narrative Therapy in order to help you re-story your experience.

— Sprout Therapy PDX, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

Often times, people who have experienced trauma don't present with concerns that exactly fit with PTSD. Especially for people who have experienced chronic and persistent trauma, coming to therapy often means addressing situational and/or life stressors first, before being able to look at some of the underlying experiences of trauma that have exacerbated those stressors. And, there are those instances where one or more very specific and identifiable traumatic events have resulted in PTSD. When people see me as a result of this type of trauma, we'll initially work at ensuring there is safety both inside and outside of the therapy space, while also developing specific skills and strategies to manage the specific impact of the trauma(s) experienced.

— Jeff Levy, Clinical Social Worker in Chicago, IL
 

Trauma can wreak havoc on our bodies and minds. Trauma can lead to feeling out of control in our abilities to make decisions, have health relationships, or even keep a steady job. Having medical or emotional health issues can make self-care difficult or feel even impossible. Let’s talk about how your experiences and current coping might be getting in the way of your emotional and physical health preventing you from enjoying your best life.

— Teresa Coral-Clark, Clinical Social Worker in San Antonio, TX

Therapists talk about Big T trauma, such as car accidents or physical abuse, and little t trauma, which is typically referring to developmental trauma- the subtle experiences we have when we are growing up that cause us persistent issues later in life. I've focused most of my training on helping with both forms of trauma as many of my clients have experienced both. Trauma is pervasive and impacts people's views of themselves, others, and the world around them. It is also often intergenerational

— Tia (Christia) Young, Counselor
 

Often times, people who have experienced trauma don't present with concerns that exactly fit with PTSD. Especially for people who have experienced chronic and persistent trauma, coming to therapy often means addressing situational and/or life stressors first, before being able to look at some of the underlying experiences of trauma that have exacerbated those stressors. And, there are those instances where one or more very specific and identifiable traumatic events have resulted in PTSD. When people see me as a result of this type of trauma, we'll initially work at ensuring there is safety both inside and outside of the therapy space, while also developing specific skills and strategies to manage the specific impact of the trauma(s) experienced.

— Jeff Levy, Clinical Social Worker in Chicago, IL

A significant amount of my training over twenty years has been in PTSD and what we now recognize as complex trauma. My approaches to treating PTSD range from narrative therapy and Dialectical Behavior Therapy to Cognitive Processing Therapy and brainspotting.

— Jason Fairweather, Psychotherapist
 

What's Developmental Trauma Disorder? It refers to adversity that impacted development in childhood. Traumatic stress concerns “something that happened” or “something that failed to happen”. Children who grow up with misattuned parents can grow up to be adults who struggle to relate in healthy ways to themselves and to others. These adults often struggle to feel safe in relationships and behave in ways that reflect this. I'll help you develop wholesome relationships starting with yourself.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA

Find out more about how I can help you with trauma via my specialty webpage: https://www.timholtzmantherapy.com/emdr-trauma-therapy

— Tim Holtzman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Berkeley, CA