Emotionally Focused Therapy

Emotionally focused therapy (EFT) – or emotionally focused couples therapy as it is sometimes known – is a short-term therapy technique focused on adult relationships. EFT seeks to help clients better understand both their own emotional responses and those of significant people in their lives. A therapist using EFT will look for patterns in the relationship and identify methods to create a more secure bond, increase trust, and help the relationship grow in a healthy direction. In a session, the therapist will observe the interactions between clients, tie this behavior into dynamics in the home, and help guide new interactions based on more open feelings. Sometimes, this includes clients discovering more emotions and feelings than they were aware they had. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of

Meet the specialists

Over 15 years of training and practicing EFT and attachment-focused therapy modalities with individuals and couples.

— Amy Green, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Online, OR
 

Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) is a short-term form of therapy that focuses on adult relationships and attachment/bonding. The therapist and clients look at patterns in the relationship and take steps to create a more secure bond and develop more trust to move the relationship in a healthier, more positive direction.

— Devona Stalnaker-Shofner, Licensed Professional Counselor

We all have needs. From the day we were born until the day we will die. We will need to know that we are connected to others, that our experiences matter to others, that if we are hurt we will be comforted, and that even when we are absent we hold space in someone's mind. When one or more of these needs is not met, or when we fail to acknowledge that we desire for that need to be met, that's when we can run into problems. By addressing and acknowledging these needs is how we thrive.

— Crystal Clark, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA
 

When we suppress or numb our emotions we don't get to pick and choose the ones we want to feel, they all get suppressed. Emotions are information and they are often trying to tell us important things. Recognizing and sitting with our emotions is a practice that we can get better at; allowing us to move deeper into our understanding of ourselves and others.

— Lindsay Anderson, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

I was trained in Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy in Graduate school and have been using it for the past 3.5 yrs. I find it to be very effective in helping clients easily recognize their patterns of behavior that lead them into the cycle of negativity and eventual despair for the relationship. This therapy allows couples to practice restructuring their "dance" moves or cycle both in and out of session eventually each partner can sooth and feel soothed by the other creating a secure attachment

— Alicia Bradshaw, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Chattanooga, TN
 

When we suppress or numb our emotions we don't get to pick and choose the ones we want to feel, they all get suppressed. Emotions are information and they are often trying to tell us important things. Recognizing and sitting with our emotions is a practice that we can get better at; allowing us to move deeper into our understanding of ourselves and others.

— Lindsay Anderson, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

Using EFT, it is possible to understand what is happening when you and your partner are plagued by the same unproductive, dysfunctional patterns over and over again. Let me show you how to understand what is really happening and how you can solve it once and for all.

— Ashley Evans, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Dallas, TX
 

Find out more about how I can help you with Emotionally Focused Therapy via my speciality webpage for couples: https://www.timholtzmantherapy.com/couples-therapy

— Tim Holtzman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Berkeley, CA

I have received training in EFT directly from the founder of the modality: Dr. Sue Johnson, as well as one of her most well-known trainers: Dr. Rebecca Jorgensen. I have completed two 4-day EFT externships, & am currently receiving advanced training & supervision in the modality (Core Skills).

— Madalina Coman, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Gatos, CA
 

Using an integrated EFT approach I help couples and individuals identify their primary emotions, work through maladaptive responses, and develop empathy and compassion for themselves and others.

— Alana Ogilvie, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR

Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) has quickly become one of the most popular approaches to working with couples. It is widely recognized as one of the most effective forms of couples therapy. The focus is on understanding how our emotions, interactions, and attachments come together to form healthy and unhealthy patterns in our relationship. EFT aims to encourage the growth of new healthy patterns and move away from unhealthy patterns.

— Jacob Santhouse, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Nampa, ID
 

I have received advanced formal training in EFT for Couples, and it is a topic I enjoy learning even more about.

— Dave Payne, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Burlington, KY

Emotion Focused Therapy takes place in the present moment; it focuses on how emotions drive our interactional patterns and it aims to strengthen human attachments by normalizing our most basic needs of belonging and acceptance.

— Miriam Porat, Counselor in Madison, WI
 

Nearly seven years of clinical experience and advanced training in Emotionally Focused Therapy.

— Ross Kellogg, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Carlsbad, CA

Our most vulnerable feelings such as fear, sadness, loneliness, etc. are often masked with secondary emotions such as anger and contempt. This happens because it is much more comfortable to express secondary feelings like anger than to express feelings like loneliness. Learning to talk about your vulnerable feeling with a safe person can help you feel more accepted, build more meaningful relationships, and become more present for your loved ones.

— Manny Romero, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Clemente, CA
 

Mind mapping. It is a skill that I use in almost every session and helps my clients understand their historical emotions and figure out what they want to do with their emotions in the future. This is only one skill that I infuse into sessions to help give emotions the primary focus.

— Matt Coffman, Licensed Professional Counselor