Emotionally Focused Therapy

Emotionally focused therapy (EFT) – or emotionally focused couples therapy as it is sometimes known – is a short-term therapy technique focused on adult relationships. EFT seeks to help clients better understand both their own emotional responses and those of significant people in their lives. A therapist using EFT will look for patterns in the relationship and identify methods to create a more secure bond, increase trust, and help the relationship grow in a healthy direction. In a session, the therapist will observe the interactions between clients, tie this behavior into dynamics in the home, and help guide new interactions based on more open feelings. Sometimes, this includes clients discovering more emotions and feelings than they were aware they had. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of

Meet the specialists

Unfortunately suffering is a part of life. It is unavoidable, although people employ various types of strategies to avoid suffering and the feelings associated with suffering. It is my belief that in order to withstand suffering, and to heal from it, we must submit to our experience and acknowledge our uncomfortable feelings. I assist my clients in acnowledging their various emotions, and encourage a curiosity about the emotion that initiates a process of healing.

— Arielle Fettman, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Portland, OR
 

I utilize emotional focused therapy in my work with couples and attachment-based theory in work with all of my clients. We'll look at how your early relationships are impacting you now and then how to heal and move forward from those wounds that are holding you back.

— Lauren Consul, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist

I utilize techniques to help you experience your emotions in session- and then you'll learn how to manage them. You won't control, stuff, or explode, but you'll manage your emotions, gaining the information that they bring to you and honoring the experience you have of them in your body.

— Molly Johnson, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Phoenix, AZ
 

In couple's counseling, I use emotionally focused therapy to gain a deeper understanding of the emotions and attachment needs of each partner. In this way, the issues of relating and communicating have more to do with what is underlying the frustrations and disconnect. The "cycle" is the problem, not the couple. Therefore, the work becomes bringing awareness to the cycle and then redefining a new shared way of bonding between partners.

— Karly Meola, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Based in attachment theory, I have found Emotionally Focused Therapy to be especially successful when mending and supporting relationships, and for navigating life after trauma. Trauma has been an emphasis in my education, and I am especially skilled in working with children, teens and families struggling to form and maintain a healthy lifestyle and thriving relationships after enduring relational devastation.

— Kathryn Willis, Therapist in ,
 

I have been trained in the EFT model. This model empahisis how healthy attachement needs are vital to a working relationship. It looks at healing trauma and past wounds that have created an atmoshpere of resentment, anger and distancing.

— Anthony Gambuzza, Psychologist in Stamford, CT

I have advanced training in EFT, including completing the EFT Externship and EFT Attachment Injury Repair Model training.

— Ryan Hill, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Alamitos, CA
 

Utilize our own emotions both in and out of the therapy room to understand ourselves and others.

— Casey Cullen, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Dallas, TX
 

Based in attachment theory, I have found Emotionally Focused Therapy to be especially successful when mending and supporting relationships, and for navigating life after trauma. Trauma has been an emphasis in my education, and I am especially skilled in working with children, teens and families struggling to form and maintain a healthy lifestyle and thriving relationships after enduring relational devastation.

— Kathryn Willis, Therapist in ,

Many couples find that they keep having the same fight over and over again. They try to compromise, problem solve, and mediate the disagreement. But nothing seems to help. That's because the fights aren't really about the "problem", they are about deep emotional needs and wounds that get activated by the intimacy of a relationship. EFT helps couples recognize the underlying emotional triggers and teaches them to support each other's emotional needs while resolving conflicts.

— Jacob Brown, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Corte madera, CA
 

Emotionally focused therapy is designed to address distress in the intimate relationships of adults. Therapists who provide emotionally focused couples therapy typically work with couples and families to help facilitate the creation of secure lasting bonds between intimate partners and family members and reinforce any preexisting positive bonds, with the goal of helping those in treatment increase security, closeness, and connection in intimate relationships.

— Eric Henley, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Mesa, AZ

Emotionally Focused Therapy's primary goal is to increase awareness along with regulating emotions. Utilizing this treatment orientation, the objective is to help clients cope with difficult and intense emotions. "Emotion transformation refers to the process of changing or transforming one emotion into another. The ability to transform a maladaptive emotion into an adaptive one is clearly a valuable skill, and research suggests that this is a purely emotion-based skill" (Greenberg, 2004)

— Susie Ibrahim, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Tustin, CA
 

As an EFT therapist, I observe the dynamics between clients in the therapy setting, which often ties into the dynamics in their home lives, and help direct new conversations and interactions based on more honest feelings. To accomplish this, I will encourage you to look at your current emotional issues and then help you discover feelings and emotions that you may not realize you have. You may discover deeper past feelings and vulnerabilities that are blocked by the more immediate emotions.

— Nikki Nolet, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Del Mar, CA

Our emotions are POWERFUL! Sometimes it seems that we have no control over them, and cannot seem to ground ourselves, so we repress them, and hope that they go away. Repressed emotions turn into triggers, and when those triggers are activated, we can feel like we're in a downward spiral. Through carefully selected techniques such as EFT Tapping, Guided Hypnotherapy, and Mindfulness, I can teach you how to ground yourself, and step into your most powerful self.

— Darya Potyagova, Clinical Social Worker in North Hollywood, CA

Training in 4-day EFT Externship + Sue Johnson's "Hold Me Tight" Conference and other trainings

— Ciara Braun, Licensed Professional Counselor in Birmingham, MI
 

I have completed EFT Level 1 and often incorporate emotion-focused techniques and chair work into my practice.

— Naomi Reesor, Psychotherapist in Vaughan,

Using an integrated EFT approach I help couples and individuals identify their primary emotions, work through maladaptive responses, and develop empathy and compassion for themselves and others.

— Alana Ogilvie, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR
 

Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) is a well-known humanistic approach to psychotherapy formulated in the 1980’s and developed in tandem with the science of adult attachment, a profound developmental theory of personality and intimate relationships. This science has expanded our understanding of individual dysfunction and health as well as the nature of love relationships and family bonds. Attachment views human beings as innately relational, social and wired for intimate bonding with others.

— Sophia Sims, Marriage & Family Therapist in Tucson, AZ

Experiencing many different specific emotions (anger, shame, sadness) may have more adaptive value than experiencing fewer states or more general ones (like just feeling bad), as these specific emotions provide richer information to guide our everyday decisions and help us deal with challenges.

— Douglas Rugh, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Washington, DC
 

I have advanced training in Emotionally Focused Therapy, having completed the 4-day externship, the Core Skills Advanced Training and supervision hours in EFT.

— Rose Kormanyos, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Sharonville, OH

I have advanced training in Emotion Focused Family Therapy which is designed to help loved ones work with those in their lives that are struggling with mental illness (eating disorders and self-harm in particular), and other behavioral concerns. I frequently use this approach to augment direct work with my clients so they have the greatest amount of support possible, especially when they aren't in my office.

— Elizabeth Bolton, Licensed Professional Counselor in Katy, TX
 

I frequently utilize EFT when working with couples in monogamous or open relationships.

— Lacie Rasmussen, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Vancouver, WA
 

I use this type of therapy when individuals, families and couples are addressing relationship issues. During this process, we break down communication dynamics to draw out the negativity, address it, and replace it with a loving approach. This therapy also helps individuals better understand, process and manage their emotions so that every day interactions with others or their environment don't hinder them from living a peaceful and productive life.

— Gini Reeves, Counselor in Marietta, GA

A basic premise of this therapy is that shaping new emotional experiences is the paramount pathway to experience change. From this stance, I am engaged in awakening and expanding emotional experience that goes beyond superficial reactive responses. As this corrective emotional experience builds and is incorporated into the client's life they are also exploring new ways to understand themselves and the dilemmas that they are facing.

— Dorice Neir, Mental Health Counselor in Cumming, GA
 

Secure bonding. Emotionally available, responsive, and expressive. Not possible for your partner? It can be done.

— Dustin Hodgkin, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Olympia, WA

A basic premise of this therapy is that shaping new emotional experiences is the paramount pathway to experience change. From this stance, I am engaged in awakening and expanding emotional experience that goes beyond superficial reactive responses. As this corrective emotional experience builds and is incorporated into the client's life they are also exploring new ways to understand themselves and the dilemmas that they are facing.

— Dorice Neir, Mental Health Counselor in Cumming, GA
 

EFT is an attachment-based model of working with intimate partners. Together we'll explore the underlying emotions that drive distressing communication and behavioral patterns and you'll learn more about your partner as you work towards building safe and secure attachment.

— Deanna Richards, Mental Health Counselor in NEW YORK, NY