Culturally Sensitive Therapy

Culturally sensitive therapy is an approach in which therapists emphasize understanding a client's background, ethnicity, and belief system. Therapists that specialize in culturally sensitive therapy will accommodate and respect the differences in practices, traditions, values and opinions of different cultures and integrate those differences into therapeutic treatment. Culturally sensitive therapy will typically lead with a thorough assessment of the culture the client identifies with. This approach can both help a client feel comfortable and at ease, and lead to more positive therapeutic outcomes – for example, depression may look different depending on your cultural background. Think this is approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapDen’s culturally sensitive therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

I am a strong advocate for cultural sensitivity. I am experienced in working with people from a variety of cultures, understanding that just as it is important to be trauma informed, it is equally important to be culturally informed.

— Trisha Thornton, Licensed Professional Counselor in El Paso, TX
 

I am culturally sensitive in all my work and experienced in working with clients from a multitude of faiths, life views and ethnicities.

— Simone Ayers, Counselor

My approach values naming and working with external or environmental factors, whether that be cultural, social, economic or ideological forces and the way they impact individuals.

— Davin Reich, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in BROOKLYN, NY

Through my own experiences of feeling "different" or as an "outsider," I strive to accept people of all cultures. I seek to learn about other cultures, and hope to listen and understand your experiences, whether they are related to culture or not. I provide you with a safe space to share your experiences and hopes and provide you with tools to heal the hurt that you may be experiencing.

— Monique Mouchamel, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Northridge,
 

I have researched Women's and Queer Studies. I was a Counselor for a LGBTQ+ agency and I have worked with clients of all ages, orientation, identities, ethnicities, races, abilities, and socioeconomic backgrounds. My work is focused on empowerment and dignity.

— Catina Cole, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Milwaukee, WI
 

Cultural context matters. All parts of your cultural identity, such as race, ethnicity, gender identity/expression, age, sexual/romantic orientation, religious orientation, and ability status are important in exploring your whole experience during the therapy process.

— Canh Tran, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Seattle, WA
 

My moto is: “To honor the scope of human diversity and promote Intercultural Dialogue”. Overall, with my life experience and my specialized training, I utilize a culturally sensitive framework to work with diverse peoples fostering wellbeing in a multicultural world.

— Nadia Thalji, Ph.D, Psychotherapist in San Francisco, CA

Ensuring that the therapeutic environment has an understanding of the clients background, ethnicity, and belief system is essential in building rapport and setting the foundation for the therapeutic relationship. I ensure that this practice is followed when working with clients in order to provide an environment conducive to a healthy therapeutic relationship.

— Diana Hope, Counselor in Mcdonough, GA
 

I am a strong advocate for cultural sensitivity. I am experienced in working with people from a variety of cultures, understanding that it is vital to take a person culture and values into consideration when teaching techniques and addressing issues.

— Trisha Thornton, Licensed Professional Counselor in El Paso, TX

To me, being a culturally sensitive therapist means viewing my client as an intersection of all of their unique identities and accepting and honoring those identities. I identify as a first-generation Pakistani-American Woman of Color and I recognize that even client's who may identify the same or similarly still have their own unique worldview and experiences. My job is to accept my clients as they are and do my own work outside the therapy room too to learn and honor their unique cultures.

— Sarah Shah, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Austin, TX
 

To me, being a culturally sensitive therapist means viewing my client as an intersection of all of their unique identities and accepting and honoring those identities. I identify as a first-generation Pakistani-American Woman of Color and I recognize that even client's who may identify the same or similarly still have their own unique worldview. My job is to accept my clients as they are and do my own work outside the therapy room too to learn and honor their unique cultures.

— Sarah Shah, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Austin, TX

I have worked cross culturally my entire career. Through teachings of Ken Hardy, Shelley Harrell, Beverly Tatum and others I have learned to adopt a cultural humility approach in working with clients. I also continue to unpack and deconstruct issues of white privilege and the institutionalized ways that white supremacy affects everything. I have contributed to book on how to supervise and train White therapists in fostering multicultural competence and humility.

— Jami Winkel, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

I was initially an anthropologist which allowed me to learn and integrate understanding of different cultures, norms, values and religions. This has helped me to explore the inner experiences of my clients with an incorporated lens with my clinical background. As a Latina, I understand the experiences of BIPOC individuals and have experienced microaggressions. This personal experiences, combined with my education has allowed me to reflect to my clients in a more sensitive and personal manner.

— Dr. Natalie Medina-Minton, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY

Racism, discrimination, and microaggressions negatively impact mental health. My therapeutic work is therefore rooted in social justice and conducted from an anti-racist/anti-oppressive lens. I believe you should spend your time in therapy working on the issues, not explaining your culture to your therapist. Therapy works best when you work with someone who understands your struggle and truly gets you.

— Ivone Gutierrez, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Berwyn, IL
 

We live within systems-families, neighborhoods, communities, school, workplaces, recreation, towns, cities, states, countries, the world & each of these systems has a culture of it's own. Our ethnicity, beliefs, customs, gender identity, economic status, religion, etc. all contribute to our cultural identity. I commit to acknowledging, and having awareness of: access, privilege, bias, and systemic barriers, as it is crucial in helping clients achieve their personal goals.

— Christine Babinec, Licensed Professional Counselor in Beaverton, OR

I practice with an "environmental" or "external" lens. While this indicates being attendant to cultural forces I broaden it to include social, economic/material and ideological factors as well as their corresponding systems and institutions.

— Davin Reich, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in BROOKLYN, NY

As a culturally sensitive therapist its my goal to foster support and understanding for clients who come from different cultural backgrounds or experiences. Allowing clients to express themselves through the lens of their cultural understanding and upbringing and working with them to feel comfortable. I am also an immigrant to this country and a third culture kid and have personal experience with acculturation issues and feeling of isolation, and not feeling accepted.

— Olivia Weber, Creative Art Therapist in New York, NY
 

When working with someone who is not white or my own ethnicity, it is important to be curious and open to learning something new. For clients who are not white, there can oftentimes be a recognition that automatically makes people feel at ease. And that has to do with understanding non mainstream culture.

— Lisa Cameron, Licensed Professional Counselor

I am a strong advocate for cultural sensitivity. I am experienced in working with people from a variety of cultures, understanding that just as it is important to be trauma informed, it is equally important to be culturally informed.

— Trisha Thornton, Licensed Professional Counselor in El Paso, TX

As an immigrant myself, I've extensive experience working with immigrant parents who have children who grew up in the United States.

— Ching Ching Ruan, Marriage & Family Therapist in Bellevue, WA
 

I was born and raised in Kenya, studied in the UK , Germany, and the US, and speak four languages. I understand the mental shifts one has to make when encountering different ideas, world views, cultures, and norms. Sometimes it is exciting, at other times it can be exhausting. Our psychology, personality, and behaviors are shaped by our cultural heritage and background. Yet therapy may not always acknowledge these core parts of self that make up our identity and shape our experience.

— Nyambura Kihato, Licensed Professional Counselor in Duluth, GA

As a queer woman of color, I do my best to continue to educate myself, check my own biases, and learn new ways to be the best ally and accomplice to people of all genders, sexualities, ethnicities, races, religious affiliations, and other groups not typically associated as having their own culture like the kink community, geek community, etc.

— Ginger Klee, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Alamitos, CA
 

Much of my graduate school training was in cross-cultural psychology, including understanding how culture is important in helping clients who struggle with various mental health problems. I use a cultural lens to view each of my clients and consider how culture has shaped them over time.

— Catherine Bitney, Clinical Psychologist in Austin, TX