Culturally Sensitive Therapy

Culturally sensitive therapy is an approach in which therapists emphasize understanding a client's background, ethnicity, and belief system. Therapists that specialize in culturally sensitive therapy will accommodate and respect the differences in practices, traditions, values and opinions of different cultures and integrate those differences into therapeutic treatment. Culturally sensitive therapy will typically lead with a thorough assessment of the culture the client identifies with. This approach can both help a client feel comfortable and at ease, and lead to more positive therapeutic outcomes – for example, depression may look different depending on your cultural background. Think this is approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapDen’s culturally sensitive therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

As an immigrant, I recognize that we are all a product of our culture and that cultures contextualize what we believe to be good, acceptable, appropriate or permissible. Cultures also define what success means, what importance failures deserve and our relationships with those around us. I will help my clients by understanding their cultural substructure and help them build solutions that are respectful of the aspects of their cultural tapestry they want to maintain.

— Foad Afshar, Psychotherapist in Manchester, NH
 

You came here to get away from the violence the pain and the inequality and found your self here. Among systems that don’t work in ways that you hoped, wading through new cultural expectations and convincing yourself this was the better path to take. Is there room for you? Room for your pain and room to share your story your pain. I can be of assistance as we navigate through a new culture or re defining yourself. I have significant experience working with refugee and marginalized populations.

— Maile Grace, Therapist in Denver, CO

My work as a therapist and assessor is to see each patient and their many identities. I aim to be culturally aware of possible difference while making space for each individual's self expression.

— Kristen Wortman, Clinical Psychologist in Oakland, CA
 

Understanding cultural competency & respecting differences in opinions, values, and attitudes of various cultures and different types of people

— Ketki Chavan, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

More westernized modalities focus on symptoms, whereas other cultures may include other facets of life like one's story and legacy. Communal trauma exists and can influence biographical change. Without the inclusion of one's culture and communal history; it is possible that both areas of dis-ease and appropriate treatment methods may be overlooked.

— Brittney George, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA
 

Personal life experience and 6 years professional experience

— Myra Flor Arpin, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Shoreline, WA

I work with couples experiencing conflict due to cultural differences lean how to celebrate and enjoy these differences using a unique combination of psycho education and intimacy based communication skills that takes on average 6 months. Learning how to focus on the real cause of your conflict is liberating, and is based in learning how to be selfish by paying attention to your inner cues and identifying needs. I work to help you set healthy adult boundaries that create intimacy.

— Triva A. Ponder, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Beverly Hills, CA
 

As a Black gay male therapist, I feel I understand people's needs who come from diverse cultural backgrounds. As a person who endeavors to be culturally humble, I encourage exploration in the areas of Age, Developmental disabilities, Indigenous heritage, National origin, Racial identity, Ethnic identity, Gender, Socioeconomic Status, and sexual orientation.

— Uriah Cty M.A., LMFT # 121606, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

As a woman of color I always work from a culturally competent lense. When working with my clients I make sure to inquire about and understand my client’s background, ethnicity, and belief system. As a therapist I incorporate cultural sensitivity into my work to accommodate and respect differences in opinions, values, and attitudes of various cultures and different types of people.

— Jaleesa Black, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

We strive to provide culturally responsive and affirming services that are sensitive to the unique needs and challenges faced by marginalized communities, including Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) and to gender, sexuality or relationship minorities. In our clinical work, we utilize an intersectional, culturally-grounded approach to understand dynamics of power, privilege, and oppression that have shaped our clients identities and lived experiences.

— Aguirre Center for Inclusive Psychotherapy, Psychologist in Atlanta, GA

This sensitivity implies knowledge borne of dialog with other cultures in and outside the workspace. Cultural sensitivity includes ethnic, religious and national differences with the cultures created by the dispossessed populations of poor, aged, and LGBTQ+ individuals. This practice is based on respect for all people for in harming others, we are harmed.

— Antonia Allison, Marriage & Family Therapist in Diamond Bar, CA
 

Much of my graduate school training was in cross-cultural psychology, including understanding how culture is important in helping clients who struggle with various mental health problems. I use a cultural lens to view each of my clients and consider how culture has shaped them over time.

— Catherine Bitney, Clinical Psychologist in Austin, TX

Our intersections (race, gender, socioecomomics, class, ect..) are who we are. We are all unique beings with unique exeriences. I'd like to get to know what makes you you!

— Erin Callahan, Therapist in Silver Spring, MD
 

As a bicultural/bilingual therapist, I am attuned to the profound impact of my clients‘ cultural background on their communication.

— Antje Hofmeister, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

I was raised in a family that were open minded. Throughout my life I have sought to be involved in social justice activities. I acquired a minor in ethnic studies and surround myself with people different from myself to continue to grow. I seek opportunities for additional training in cultural competency. The most important thing that makes me an expert in this area is knowing that I am not an expert in others' lives and learning never ends, it is ongoing.

— ShannonElaine John, Counselor in Fort Morgan, CO
 

Many of the clients who see me experience identity issues or trauma symptoms related to racially based or intergenerational traumas. My professional training and experience as an activist and advocate spanning decades underlies much of my focus on racial and social justice. I'm particularly attuned to issues of "difference" among those whose experiences do not reflect dominant thinking regardless of whether that experience reflects marginalization: Mixed-race, interracial and multicultural.

— Meira Greenfeld, Psychotherapist in Phoenix, AZ

As a Black gay male therapist, I feel I understand people's needs who come from diverse cultural backgrounds. As a person who endeavors to be culturally humble, I encourage exploration in the areas of Age, Developmental disabilities, Indigenous heritage, National origin, Racial identity, Ethnic identity, Gender, Socioeconomic Status, and sexual orientation.

— Uriah Cty M.A., LMFT # 121606, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

I was raised in a family that were open minded. Throughout my life I have sought to be involved in social justice activities. I acquired a minor in ethnic studies and surround myself with people different from myself to continue to grow. I seek opportunities for additional training in cultural competency. The most important thing that makes me an expert in this area is knowing that I am not an expert in others' lives and learning never ends, it is ongoing.

— ShannonElaine John, Counselor in Fort Morgan, CO

I continuously educate myself on culturally sensitive skills I can apply to my therapeutic approach. I educate myself on the different cultural backgrounds of my clients. After all, it's my job to educate myself, not my client's job to educate me.

— Diamond Rodgers, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist