Culturally Sensitive Therapy

Culturally sensitive therapy is an approach in which therapists emphasize understanding a client's background, ethnicity, and belief system. Therapists that specialize in culturally sensitive therapy will accommodate and respect the differences in practices, traditions, values and opinions of different cultures and integrate those differences into therapeutic treatment. Culturally sensitive therapy will typically lead with a thorough assessment of the culture the client identifies with. This approach can both help a client feel comfortable and at ease, and lead to more positive therapeutic outcomes – for example, depression may look different depending on your cultural background. Think this is approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapDen’s culturally sensitive therapy experts today.

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This sensitivity implies knowledge borne of dialog with other cultures in and outside the workspace. Cultural sensitivity includes ethnic, religious and national differences with the cultures created by the dispossessed populations of poor, aged, and LGBTQ+ individuals. This practice is based on not harming others because in doing so, we are harmed. We can draw boundaries in functional ways.

— Antonia Allison, Marriage & Family Therapist in Diamond Bar, CA

Integrating diversity and acceptance of different cultures are in the root of my counseling practice. I believe that the exposure to the rich backgrounds of the diversity of my clients has enriched me. I think that opening ourselves to learning and surrounding ourselves with the rich diversity that we have in this country is important to our personal growth and our growth as a society. My practice offers an accepting and nonjudgmental environment.

— Galit Ribakoff, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Supervisor in Dallas, TX
 

Culturally sensitive therapy is important to me because it helps me to understand a client’s background, ethnicity, and belief system. With me practicing culturally sensitive therapy, I am able to communicate an awareness of my client's culture, beliefs, and practices, and I have an awareness of the client's goals and expectations.

— Chioko Grevious, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Sacramento, CA

I have many years of experience of working with people from different backgrounds. I recognize that clients come to therapy representing a range of experiences specific to race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, gender and gender identity, disability, religious affiliation, and a host of many other factors. I affirm the dignity of all clients and consciously offer services that are inclusive, accepting, and safe for people seeking help.

— Kimberly Collins, Student Therapist in New York, NY
 

I believe strongly that our culture(s) play a huge role in our happiness as well as our dysfunction. I take social, cultural, family, and systems level factors into account when working with clients and believe that healing our relationships to our cultures is a major part of overall mental health.

— Dina Bdaiwi, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Irvine, CA

As a white clinician, I strongly believe it is my job to orient my work around acknowledging systems of oppression, because I know the therapy room exists in the world, not in a vacuum. I believe therapy can be a liberation tool against oppression because the more we can feel, grieve and talk about these systems, the more fortified we are to resist them. Your ancestral roots, intersecting identities, and cultural practices are an honor for me to make space for in our work together.

— Talia Chanoff, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in ,
 

My expertise includes working with intercultural and cross-cultural individuals, couples, and groups. I pay special attention to the dynamics of communication with certain role expectations, values, beliefs, and emotional expression.

— Dr. Nadia Thalji, Psychotherapist in San Francisco, CA

I have worked with BIPOC families entering parenthood for several years. During that time I have learned how important is to consider the ways in which race and culture inform a person's stressors, protective factors, and parenting styles. As a woman of color, I also understand from a personal perspective the importance of recognizing the influence culture and race having in our experiences.

— Luisa Bakhoum, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate
 

We have a diverse staff with different backgrounds that help understand your unique experiences based on the intersectionality of your identities.

— New Patterns Counseling, PLLC, Licensed Professional Counselor in ROUND ROCK, TX

When life hurts, our identity is never the problem. The problem is our world’s biases against people who differ from the dominant group in one or more ways. And the discrimination hurts - emotionally, physically, financially, socially, occupationally, and in ways that are hard to even put into words. To change this problem, we need to constantly check our empathy and our thinking (towards others and ourselves), actively analyze the toxic messages around us, and take action (even small ones).

— Dr. Amy Hsiung, Psychologist in Phoenix, AZ
 

My practice's name (Spring Hill Multi-Cultural Counseling) is after this approach, I strongly believe in this approach and utilize it as the foundation of my counseling profession.

— Wandaliz Marrero, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Spring Hill, FL

I have many years of experience of working with people from different backgrounds. I recognize that clients come to therapy representing a range of experiences specific to race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, gender and gender identity, disability, religious affiliation, and a host of many other factors. I affirm the dignity of all clients and consciously offer services that are inclusive, accepting, and safe for people seeking help.

— Kimberly Collins, Student Therapist in New York, NY
 

I believe that we all see the world through our own cultural lens. Being allowed to learn about a client's world and belief systems is a truly humbling experience. With my experience as a former diversity coordinator coupled with being aware of the various cultural stipulations that exist in society allows me to provide you with the necessary and relevant interventions that would not only be respectful to your beliefs but also catered towards the system we are a part of.

— Jeremy Bissram, Psychologist in Las Vegas, NV

My background working with diverse individuals has been some of the most humbling and rewarding work I've done because it pushes me to examine the biases and assumptions I've accumulated over the years living in the US majority culture. I work from a broad definition of diversity that encompasses not only racial/ethnic identity but also ability status, faith background, family make up, political ideology, and more. I value your uniqueness and building trust with you is my top priority.

— Linda Louden, Psychologist
 

As a Latinx, white passing, big-boned, bilingual, educated, and mindfully sound provider; my intention is to honor the intersections of your identity and the cultures that have shaped you. I understand the impact systems have on culture and the generational or historical trauma that is passed down, as well as the generational wisdom that we carry. My hope is to hold space for what you need to explore this area of your life.

— Angie Hernandez-Harris, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Boise, ID

I have special expertise in bilingual assessment and multicultural competence in both graduate school and internship training. I have extensive clinical experience working with culturally diverse clients and continue to stay current in culturally sensitive therapy through workshops. I have published, conducted workshops, and served as an expert consultant in several states in the area of bilingual assessment.

— Marylyn Sines, Psychologist in Southlake, TX
 

I was raised in a family that were open minded. Throughout my life I have sought to be involved in social justice activities. I acquired a minor in ethnic studies and surround myself with people different from myself to continue to grow. I seek opportunities for additional training in cultural competency. The most important thing that makes me an expert in this area is knowing that I am not an expert in others' lives and learning never ends, it is ongoing.

— ShannonElaine John, Counselor in Fort Morgan, CO

Much of my graduate school training was in cross-cultural psychology, including understanding how culture is important in helping clients who struggle with various mental health problems. I use a cultural lens to view each of my clients and consider how culture has shaped them over time.

— Catherine Bitney, Clinical Psychologist in Austin, TX
 

My healing framework is explicitly trauma-informed, anti-racist, queer and trans-affirming, fat and body positive and anti-oppressive. I also offer anti-racism coaching for white folx seeking a well-held supportive container to unlearn whiteness and racism.

— horizon greene, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Seattle, WA