Culturally Sensitive Therapy

Culturally sensitive therapy is an approach in which therapists emphasize understanding a client's background, ethnicity, and belief system. Therapists that specialize in culturally sensitive therapy will accommodate and respect the differences in practices, traditions, values and opinions of different cultures and integrate those differences into therapeutic treatment. Culturally sensitive therapy will typically lead with a thorough assessment of the culture the client identifies with. This approach can both help a client feel comfortable and at ease, and lead to more positive therapeutic outcomes – for example, depression may look different depending on your cultural background. Think this is approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapDen’s culturally sensitive therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

I have been involved with Culturally Sensitive Therapy for over a decade. I found interest in it on my journey as a multiethnic individual myself. I have attended workshops during my college years and was a part of Intercultural Community Builders and served as Board President for a short time. This is a program educating individuals grades 7 to college and professionals in a 3-day workshop teaching subject matter on cultural diversity. I want my clients to feel safe, unjudged, and accepted.

— Jennifer Stephenson, Counselor in Fort Collins, CO
 

I often say that while CBT and psychoanalysis are my preferred treatment orientations, Multicultural Competence is my orientation to treatment. Being multiculturally competent means shutting up and really listening when someone's experience of the world is different from yours because of differences in race, gender, class, culture, and sexuality. It also means not assuming that because you share a cultural identity, that this somehow erases the other person's individuality and personality. It means sitting in that tension between what makes us different, and what makes us all the same. For me, it also means owning to your mistakes, and understanding that while one's intent may not be malicious, it's the results of one's behavior that matters.

— Daniel Gaztambide, Psychologist in New York, NY
 

It is one of my passions to help clients explore the intersection of their different identities and how those various identities have shaped them and their choices. My specialties in this area include helping clients navigate cross-cultural interactions in their lives, healing from cultural and identity- based traumas including experiences of discrimination, and helping cross-cultural couples and families navigate some of their unique struggles.

— Kaley Sinclair Jiawon, Counselor in Orlando, FL

Diversity characterizes today’s mental health field. I believe that a culturally congruent practice can improve access, promote positive outcomes and reduce disparities. I am fascinated with your cultural values, beliefs, worldview. Please share them with me, let me into your world and together we'll work on improvements to better your life.

— Radmila Hollnagel, Licensed Professional Counselor in Charlotte, NC
 

Over the decades of counseling I have had the privilege and good fortune to work with people of diverse ethnicities, religions, sexual identities, classes, sizes, educational levels and so on. Many of the couples I have worked with have been cross cultural and from every different country, culture, religion, ethnicity that you can imagine. It's been a really wonderful experience for me and I, of course, hope I have served them well.

— Esther Lerman, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

I am an immigrant myself and worked with multicultural issues.

— Junko Yamauchi, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Clara, CA
 

As a German-Norweigen-Polish American (basically a white guy) who grew up in the midwest who married a woman who immigrated from Korea I learned a great deal about myself and how I and others experience differences as well as similarities. I was immersed in the Korean-American community for 17 years and playfully consider myself an American-Korean-American. A diversity of life experiences and view points is beautiful and it is a joy to learn from one another.

— John Loppnow, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in La Canada, CA

It is one of my passions to help clients explore the intersection of their different identities and how those various identities have shaped them and their choices. My specialties in this area include helping clients navigate cross-cultural interactions in their lives, healing from cultural and identity- based traumas including experiences of discrimination, and helping cross-cultural couples and families navigate some of their unique struggles.

— Kaley Sinclair Jiawon, Counselor in Orlando, FL