Culturally Sensitive Therapy

Culturally sensitive therapy is an approach in which therapists emphasize understanding a client's background, ethnicity, and belief system. Therapists that specialize in culturally sensitive therapy will accommodate and respect the differences in practices, traditions, values and opinions of different cultures and integrate those differences into therapeutic treatment. Culturally sensitive therapy will typically lead with a thorough assessment of the culture the client identifies with. This approach can both help a client feel comfortable and at ease, and lead to more positive therapeutic outcomes – for example, depression may look different depending on your cultural background. Think this is approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapDen’s culturally sensitive therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

I am an immigrant myself and worked with multicultural issues.

— Junko Yamauchi, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Clara, CA
 

It is one of my passions to help clients explore the intersection of their different identities and how those various identities have shaped them and their choices. My specialties in this area include helping clients navigate cross-cultural interactions in their lives, healing from cultural and identity- based traumas including experiences of discrimination, and helping cross-cultural couples and families navigate some of their unique struggles.

— Kaley Sinclair Jiawon, Counselor in Orlando, FL

Diversity characterizes today’s mental health field. I believe that a culturally congruent practice can improve access, promote positive outcomes and reduce disparities. I am fascinated with your cultural values, beliefs, worldview. Please share them with me, let me into your world and together we'll work on improvements to better your life.

— Radmila Hollnagel, Licensed Professional Counselor in Charlotte, NC
 

I often say that while CBT and psychoanalysis are my preferred treatment orientations, Multicultural Competence is my orientation to treatment. Being multiculturally competent means shutting up and really listening when someone's experience of the world is different from yours because of differences in race, gender, class, culture, and sexuality. It also means not assuming that because you share a cultural identity, that this somehow erases the other person's individuality and personality. It means sitting in that tension between what makes us different, and what makes us all the same. For me, it also means owning to your mistakes, and understanding that while one's intent may not be malicious, it's the results of one's behavior that matters.

— Daniel Gaztambide, Psychologist in New York, NY

It is one of my passions to help clients explore the intersection of their different identities and how those various identities have shaped them and their choices. My specialties in this area include helping clients navigate cross-cultural interactions in their lives, healing from cultural and identity- based traumas including experiences of discrimination, and helping cross-cultural couples and families navigate some of their unique struggles.

— Kaley Sinclair Jiawon, Counselor in Orlando, FL