Culturally Sensitive Therapy

Culturally sensitive therapy is an approach in which therapists emphasize understanding a client's background, ethnicity, and belief system. Therapists that specialize in culturally sensitive therapy will accommodate and respect the differences in practices, traditions, values and opinions of different cultures and integrate those differences into therapeutic treatment. Culturally sensitive therapy will typically lead with a thorough assessment of the culture the client identifies with. This approach can both help a client feel comfortable and at ease, and lead to more positive therapeutic outcomes – for example, depression may look different depending on your cultural background. Think this is approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapDen’s culturally sensitive therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

Ensuring that the therapeutic environment has an understanding of the clients background, ethnicity, and belief system is essential in building rapport and setting the foundation for the therapeutic relationship. I ensure that this practice is followed when working with clients in order to provide an environment conducive to a healthy therapeutic relationship.

— Diana Hope, Counselor in Mcdonough, GA
 

I have worked cross culturally my entire career. Through teachings of Ken Hardy, Shelley Harrell, Beverly Tatum and others I have learned to adopt a cultural humility approach in working with clients. I also continue to unpack and deconstruct issues of white privilege and the institutionalized ways that white supremacy affects everything. I have contributed to book on how to supervise and train White therapists in fostering multicultural competence and humility.

— Jami Winkel, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

I often say that while CBT and psychoanalysis are my preferred treatment orientations, Multicultural Competence is my orientation to treatment. Being multiculturally competent means shutting up and really listening when someone's experience of the world is different from yours because of differences in race, gender, class, culture, and sexuality. It also means not assuming that because you share a cultural identity, that this somehow erases the other person's individuality and personality. It means sitting in that tension between what makes us different, and what makes us all the same. For me, it also means owning to your mistakes, and understanding that while one's intent may not be malicious, it's the results of one's behavior that matters.

— Daniel Gaztambide, Psychologist in New York, NY

Each person on staff receives training in this area multiple times a year. Culture sensitivity is also part of our mission.

— NYC AFFIRMATIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY, Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY
 

It is one of my passions to help clients explore the intersection of their different identities and how those various identities have shaped them and their choices. My specialties in this area include helping clients navigate cross-cultural interactions in their lives, healing from cultural and identity- based traumas including experiences of discrimination, and helping cross-cultural couples and families navigate some of their unique struggles.

— Kaley Sinclair Jiawon, Counselor in Orlando, FL

It is one of my passions to help clients explore the intersection of their different identities and how those various identities have shaped them and their choices. My specialties in this area include helping clients navigate cross-cultural interactions in their lives, healing from cultural and identity- based traumas including experiences of discrimination, and helping cross-cultural couples and families navigate some of their unique struggles.

— Kaley Sinclair Jiawon, Counselor in Orlando, FL
 

We are all informed and shaped by layers of cultural contexts, inseparable from our material and psychological realities. I engage in relentless interrogation of psychology's false neutrality and unacknowledged cultural influences, and practice self-reflexivity towards the role my social locations play. Attention to how our perspectives, experiences, and selves are culturally mediated recognizes the complex nuances beyond theories and simplistic categories.

— Jessamyn Wesley, Licensed Professional Counselor in portland, OR

Over the decades of counseling I have had the privilege and good fortune to work with people of diverse ethnicities, religions, sexual identities, classes, sizes, educational levels and so on. Many of the couples I have worked with have been cross cultural and from every different country, culture, religion, ethnicity that you can imagine. It's been a really wonderful experience for me and I, of course, hope I have served them well.

— Esther Lerman, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

Diversity characterizes today’s mental health field. I believe that a culturally congruent practice can improve access, promote positive outcomes and reduce disparities. I am fascinated with your cultural values, beliefs, worldview. Please share them with me, let me into your world and together we'll work on improvements to better your life.

— Radmila Hollnagel, Licensed Professional Counselor in Charlotte, NC

I recognize that each of us has a unique story lived during the years of being on the planet. This story is impacted by various factors which create the human body into which we were born. I take these aspects of a person's individual experience and identity into account. These include, but are not limited to: age, developmental and physical disability, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, indigenous heritage, nation of origin, gender and body shape/size.

— Maggie Ritnour, Therapist in Brooklyn, NY