Culturally Sensitive Therapy

Culturally sensitive therapy is an approach in which therapists emphasize understanding a client's background, ethnicity, and belief system. Therapists that specialize in culturally sensitive therapy will accommodate and respect the differences in practices, traditions, values and opinions of different cultures and integrate those differences into therapeutic treatment. Culturally sensitive therapy will typically lead with a thorough assessment of the culture the client identifies with. This approach can both help a client feel comfortable and at ease, and lead to more positive therapeutic outcomes – for example, depression may look different depending on your cultural background. Think this is approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapDen’s culturally sensitive therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

It is one of my passions to help clients explore the intersection of their different identities and how those various identities have shaped them and their choices. My specialties in this area include helping clients navigate cross-cultural interactions in their lives, healing from cultural and identity- based traumas including experiences of discrimination, and helping cross-cultural couples and families navigate some of their unique struggles.

— Kaley Sinclair Jiawon, Counselor in Orlando, FL

My work style is strongly influenced by feminist-multicultural-social justice frameworks, with the highest priority in understanding and empowering you, and helping you transcend past/present wounds and trauma towards a holistic wellness. This means I would like to fully see and understand you through your historical/socio-cultural backgrounds as well as your intersecting identities and how you have learned to navigate the systems. I would be honored to help you become the empowered you.

— Lina Pranata, Psychologist in Seattle, WA
 

My work style is strongly influenced by feminist-multicultural-social justice frameworks, with the highest priority in understanding and empowering you, and helping you transcend past/present wounds and trauma towards a holistic wellness. This means I would like to fully see and understand you through your historical/socio-cultural backgrounds as well as your intersecting identities and how you have learned to navigate the systems. I would be honored to help you become the empowered you.

— Lina Pranata, Psychologist in Seattle, WA

As a therapist of color, I know how it important it can be to receive support from someone who may connect with my personal journey of being of color. I commit to providing a therapeutic space that honors and invites an individual to show up in all of their identities and find support in what it means to navigate the world in their identities. I strive to hold the strengths and challenges that may be present due to an individual's cultural identities as it integrated throughout the therapy.

— Jeanette Lopez-Urbina, Clinical Social Worker in Berkeley, CA
 

I have had the unique opportunity to practice in a wide variety of settings and cultures. I draw from this background, as I carefully tailor my approach to each individual client. I assess each client’s specific goals, strengths, and challenges, and together, develop an appropriate treatment plan.

— Kadesha Adelakun, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Kennesaw, GA
 

How we see the world is in every way affected by the culture, whether by familial orientation or current surroundings. Culture can mean the ethnic or religious background we come from, but it can also mean the family that we come from or have created. Culture is fluid. And it's essential that when we explore our patterns, values, and goals that we do so with an awareness of how our ideas and thoughts are informed and influenced.

— Tara Genovese, Clinical Social Worker in ,

I have worked cross culturally my entire career. Through teachings of Ken Hardy, Shelley Harrell, Beverly Tatum and others I have learned to adopt a cultural humility approach in working with clients. I also continue to unpack and deconstruct issues of white privilege and the institutionalized ways that white supremacy affects everything. I have contributed to book on how to supervise and train White therapists in fostering multicultural competence and humility.

— Jami Winkel, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

In order to heal, you must be accurately seen and accepted! I see therapy as an opportunity for you to be seen in your wholeness, while we unpack the systemic and structural oppression you combat and survive every day. I utilize careful attunement in session to understand you as the incredible, unique, expansive person you are. Outside of session, I remain active in my own education to better understand various identities you may hold that are different from my own.

— Sam Krehel, Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA

I have worked with many people who are African Americans, from other countries and Queer in the course of my career. I try to be very aware of my clients past and present life and I am always open to being told when I am insensitive.

— Deborah Hellerstein, Therapist in Chicago, IL
 

As an internal student and immigrant from Taiwan almost two decades, I have a deep understanding about the struggle of trying to survive, fit in, or/and adapt to another (dominant) culture and the impact of acculturation. Other than my personal experiences, I've had additional trainings in cultural competency and worked with diverse populations. With cross cultural sensitivity, I create a safe place for clients to explore their internal and external experiences, so that they can heal and grow.

— Juei-Chen Chao, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

Public Safety Culture Health Care Culture Diverse Ethnic Groups Mixed ethnicity relationships

— Jenna Hawton-Calingasan, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Fairfield, CA
 

Over the decades of counseling I have had the privilege and good fortune to work with people of diverse ethnicities, religions, sexual identities, classes, sizes, educational levels and so on. Many of the couples I have worked with have been cross cultural and from every different country, culture, religion, ethnicity that you can imagine. It's been a really wonderful experience for me and I, of course, hope I have served them well.

— Esther Lerman, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

I'm non judgmental and culturally humble. I don't make any attribution in advance. I'm open to listen without bias.

— Gioia Schuler, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA
 

I recognize that each of us has a unique story lived during the years of being on the planet. This story is impacted by various factors which create the human body into which we were born. I take these aspects of a person's individual experience and identity into account. These include, but are not limited to: age, developmental and physical disability, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, indigenous heritage, nation of origin, gender and body shape/size.

— Maggie Ritnour, Therapist in Brooklyn, NY

It is one of my passions to help clients explore the intersection of their different identities and how those various identities have shaped them and their choices. My specialties in this area include helping clients navigate cross-cultural interactions in their lives, healing from cultural and identity- based traumas including experiences of discrimination, and helping cross-cultural couples and families navigate some of their unique struggles.

— Kaley Sinclair Jiawon, Counselor in Orlando, FL
 

Being attuned to each person or couple/family's developmental background and experienc broadens the concept Culturally sensitive therapy to include anything and EVERYTHING that may be relevant. Attitudes, values, beliefs, and behaviors develop and/or are promoted for each person to survive the stress, demands, challenges... and sometimes, trauma of their childhood and/or community. That community may be an ethnic, racial, or religious community, but it also may be one's family of origin.

— Ronald Mah, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Leandro, CA

My work as a therapist and assessor is to see each patient and their many identities. I aim to be culturally aware of possible difference while making space for each individual's self expression.

— Kristen Wortman, Clinical Psychologist in Lafayette, CA
 

Cultural, ethnic, and racial identities of the client are explored with openness and curiosity. Discussion and processing of family systems can be included, such as the clients relationship with parents, siblings, and elders. The therapist offers a safe space to explore cultural identity and how this relates to the process of healing and well-being for the client.

— Robyn Tamanaha, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Irvine, CA

I often say that while CBT and psychoanalysis are my preferred treatment orientations, Multicultural Competence is my orientation to treatment. Being multiculturally competent means shutting up and really listening when someone's experience of the world is different from yours because of differences in race, gender, class, culture, and sexuality. It also means not assuming that because you share a cultural identity, that this somehow erases the other person's individuality and personality. It means sitting in that tension between what makes us different, and what makes us all the same. For me, it also means owning to your mistakes, and understanding that while one's intent may not be malicious, it's the results of one's behavior that matters.

— Daniel Gaztambide, Psychologist in New York, NY
 

I was raised in a family that were open minded. Throughout my life I have sought to be involved in social justice activities. I acquired a minor in ethnic studies and surround myself with people different from myself to continue to grow. I seek opportunities for additional training in cultural competency. The most important thing that makes me an expert in this area is knowing that I am not an expert in others' lives and learning never ends, it is ongoing.

— ShannonElaine John, Counselor in Fort Morgan, CO
 

In my graduate training, I had several opportunities to work people with varying cultural identification. Your culture is a system, it can impact you and your relationships more than you realize. I will not shy away from topics regarding race, class, religion, sexual orientation, sub-cultures, white privilege, etc. If applicable to therapy, we will discuss our own possible differences and how that may impact our therapeutic alliance. I will not ask you to be my educator during your therapy time

— Jamie Nicole Short, Registered Marriage and Family Therapist Intern in Portland,, OR

I have advanced post graduate training in multiculturally responsive psychotherapy as well as training as a transgender ally.

— Kelly Kampf, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Doylestown, PA