Culturally Sensitive Therapy

Culturally sensitive therapy is an approach in which therapists emphasize understanding a client's background, ethnicity, and belief system. Therapists that specialize in culturally sensitive therapy will accommodate and respect the differences in practices, traditions, values and opinions of different cultures and integrate those differences into therapeutic treatment. Culturally sensitive therapy will typically lead with a thorough assessment of the culture the client identifies with. This approach can both help a client feel comfortable and at ease, and lead to more positive therapeutic outcomes – for example, depression may look different depending on your cultural background. Think this is approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapDen’s culturally sensitive therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

I was raised in a family that were open minded. Throughout my life I have sought to be involved in social justice activities. I acquired a minor in ethnic studies and surround myself with people different from myself to continue to grow. I seek opportunities for additional training in cultural competency. The most important thing that makes me an expert in this area is knowing that I am not an expert in others' lives and learning never ends, it is ongoing.

— ShannonElaine John, Counselor in Fort Morgan, CO
 

I was raised in a family that were open minded. Throughout my life I have sought to be involved in social justice activities. I acquired a minor in ethnic studies and surround myself with people different from myself to continue to grow. I seek opportunities for additional training in cultural competency. The most important thing that makes me an expert in this area is knowing that I am not an expert in others' lives and learning never ends, it is ongoing.

— ShannonElaine John, Counselor in Fort Morgan, CO

All of us are conditioned by our surroundings — our families, communities, societies, culture — without exceptions. No matter your creed, gender, colour, etc., we carry experiences from our past, tinted by the world around us. Understanding who we are requires understanding these influences; otherwise, we cannot tease out who we are at our "core," from what we've been taught. Even if there is overlap, there is also a difference! I look forward to sifting through the layers with you.

— I-Ching Grace Hung, Psychologist in San Francisco, CA
 

I view people within the context of their lived experiences. Each person is influenced by the culture of their family of origin, where they grew up and where they have lived, the political climate, their peers, their faith communities, and other social factors differently. The more I appreciate and know who you are, the more I can validate and affirm your identity and positive self-view.

— Deena Hitzke, Counselor in Tucson, AZ

As a Black gay male therapist, I feel I understand people's needs who come from diverse cultural backgrounds. As a person who endeavors to be culturally humble, I encourage exploration in the areas of Age, Developmental disabilities, Indigenous heritage, National origin, Racial identity, Ethnic identity, Gender, Socioeconomic Status, and sexual orientation.

— Uriah Cty M.A., LMFT # 121606, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

As a woman of color I always work from a culturally competent lense. When working with my clients I make sure to inquire about and understand my client’s background, ethnicity, and belief system. As a therapist I incorporate cultural sensitivity into my work to accommodate and respect differences in opinions, values, and attitudes of various cultures and different types of people.

— Jaleesa Black, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA

I am a cultural diversity practitioner and social justice educator. I bring this with me into my practice. It is important that all clients recognize they are valued, seen, and that they are respected.

— Jacqueline Burnett-Brown, Marriage & Family Therapist
 

Our intersections (race, gender, socioecomomics, class, ect..) are who we are. We are all unique beings with unique exeriences. I'd like to get to know what makes you you!

— Erin Callahan, Therapist in Silver Spring, MD

More westernized modalities focus on symptoms, whereas other cultures may include other facets of life like one's story and legacy. Communal trauma exists and can influence biographical change. Without the inclusion of one's culture and communal history; it is possible that both areas of dis-ease and appropriate treatment methods may be overlooked.

— Brittney George, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA
 

Cultural, ethnic, and racial identities of the client are explored with openness and curiosity. Discussion and processing of family systems can be included, such as the clients relationship with parents, siblings, and elders. The therapist offers a safe space to explore cultural identity and how this relates to the process of healing and well-being for the client.

— Robyn Tamanaha, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Irvine, CA

We strive to provide culturally responsive and affirming services that are sensitive to the unique needs and challenges faced by marginalized communities, including Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) and to gender, sexuality or relationship minorities. In our clinical work, we utilize an intersectional, culturally-grounded approach to understand dynamics of power, privilege, and oppression that have shaped our clients identities and lived experiences.

— Aguirre Center for Inclusive Psychotherapy, Psychologist in Atlanta, GA
 

As a Black gay male therapist, I feel I understand people's needs who come from diverse cultural backgrounds. As a person who endeavors to be culturally humble, I encourage exploration in the areas of Age, Developmental disabilities, Indigenous heritage, National origin, Racial identity, Ethnic identity, Gender, Socioeconomic Status, and sexual orientation.

— Uriah Cty M.A., LMFT # 121606, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA