Culturally Sensitive Therapy

Culturally sensitive therapy is an approach in which therapists emphasize understanding a client's background, ethnicity, and belief system. Therapists that specialize in culturally sensitive therapy will accommodate and respect the differences in practices, traditions, values and opinions of different cultures and integrate those differences into therapeutic treatment. Culturally sensitive therapy will typically lead with a thorough assessment of the culture the client identifies with. This approach can both help a client feel comfortable and at ease, and lead to more positive therapeutic outcomes – for example, depression may look different depending on your cultural background. Think this is approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapDen’s culturally sensitive therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

More westernized modalities focus on symptoms, whereas other cultures may include other facets of life like one's story and legacy. Communal trauma exists and can influence biographical change. Without the inclusion of one's culture and communal history; it is possible that both areas of dis-ease and appropriate treatment methods may be overlooked.

— Brittney George, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA
 

I am a cultural diversity practitioner and social justice educator. I bring this with me into my practice. It is important that all clients recognize they are valued, seen, and that they are respected.

— Jacqueline Burnett-Brown, Marriage & Family Therapist

All of us are conditioned by our surroundings — our families, communities, societies, culture — without exceptions. No matter your creed, gender, colour, etc., we carry experiences from our past, tinted by the world around us. Understanding who we are requires understanding these influences; otherwise, we cannot tease out who we are at our "core," from what we've been taught. Even if there is overlap, there is also a difference! I look forward to sifting through the layers with you.

— I-Ching Grace Hung, Psychologist in San Francisco, CA
 

As a Black gay male therapist, I feel I understand people's needs who come from diverse cultural backgrounds. As a person who endeavors to be culturally humble, I encourage exploration in the areas of Age, Developmental disabilities, Indigenous heritage, National origin, Racial identity, Ethnic identity, Gender, Socioeconomic Status, and sexual orientation.

— Uriah Cty M.A., LMFT # 121606, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

As a Black gay male therapist, I feel I understand people's needs who come from diverse cultural backgrounds. As a person who endeavors to be culturally humble, I encourage exploration in the areas of Age, Developmental disabilities, Indigenous heritage, National origin, Racial identity, Ethnic identity, Gender, Socioeconomic Status, and sexual orientation.

— Uriah Cty M.A., LMFT # 121606, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

We strive to provide culturally responsive and affirming services that are sensitive to the unique needs and challenges faced by marginalized communities, including Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) and to gender, sexuality or relationship minorities. In our clinical work, we utilize an intersectional, culturally-grounded approach to understand dynamics of power, privilege, and oppression that have shaped our clients identities and lived experiences.

— Aguirre Center for Inclusive Psychotherapy, Psychologist in Atlanta, GA

I have worked cross culturally my entire career. Through teachings of Ken Hardy, Shelley Harrell, Beverly Tatum and others I have learned to adopt a cultural humility approach in working with clients. I also continue to unpack and deconstruct issues of white privilege and the institutionalized ways that white supremacy affects everything. I have contributed to book on how to supervise and train White therapists in fostering multicultural competence and humility.

— Jami Winkel, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

I have worked with clients from diverse cultural backgrounds from the beginning of my career in 2003, and it is something that will always be of high value to me. I have been fortunate to always have had supervisors that focused on being culturally sensitive and from them, I learned the importance of viewing each individual and their mental health needs within the context of their own culture, while being careful to adapt my treatment to be culturally responsive to my clients.

— Taina Aceves, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Chula Vista, CA

Part of the reason for starting my company came through the understanding that I cannot help everyone in a culturally aware way as a heterosexual white woman. Having people work with a therapist they feel connected and safe with is the first priority, so real support and change can occur. The only way that is possible is through connecting a diverse group of therapists and offering the choice to the person seeking support. They can ask for what they need and find the person who fits those needs.

— Emery Mikel, Therapist in New York, NY
 

As a Black gay male therapist, I feel I understand people's needs who come from diverse cultural backgrounds. As a person who endeavors to be culturally humble, I encourage exploration in the areas of Age, Developmental disabilities, Indigenous heritage, National origin, Racial identity, Ethnic identity, Gender, Socioeconomic Status, and sexual orientation.

— Uriah Cty M.A., LMFT # 121606, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Awareness and understanding of how your values, beliefs and culture influence who you are and how you interpret your experiences. SomeI acknowledge that you are a member of a group (age, immigrant issues, gender, ethnicity, race, religion, sexual orientation, family history class, etc.) Accepting

— Lucinda Cadet, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Washington, DC
 

As a multicultural person, providing a space that is not only trauma-informed, but culturally sensitive is vital to me as a mental health professional. I believe therapy not only should be culturally-sensitive, but creative in the ways we reach clients to make therapy accessible, meaningful, and impactful. By providing this space, I keep in mind I am not an expert on everyone's culture, while not expecting those to educate me so that they feel comfortable.

— Cheyenne Bellarosa, Counselor in Lakewood, CO

Since beginning my career in Social Work, I've strived to understand each client’s background, ethnicity, and belief system. I incorporate cultural sensitivity into my work to accommodate and respect differences in opinions, values, and attitudes of various cultures. I use my cultural sensitivity to gain and maintain cultural competence. I believe this is especially important when the client's culture differs from mine.

— Raenisha Love, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Norwalk, CA
 

My work as a therapist and assessor is to see each patient and their many identities. I aim to be culturally aware of possible difference while making space for each individual's self expression.

— Kristen Wortman, Clinical Psychologist in Lafayette, CA