Veterans/Military Service

Veterans and active duty military have a unique set of circumstances and experiences that can lead to mental health issues. The sometimes dangerous and traumatic environment in which members of the military serve can lead to PTSD as well as other issues, such as substance abuse or traumatic brain injury.  When returning home, some veterans have trouble adjusting to life outside of the military and may feel disconnected from family and friends. They may isolate themselves and are at risk for developing mental health issues including anxiety and depression. Military life can also have an effect on other members of the family system. A qualified mental health professional who specializes in working with veterans and their families can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s veterans/military experts today.

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Meet the specialists

I am a Veteran who served in the U.S. Air Force in many capacities for over 17 years. I love this community. I believe that Veteran's and their family members go through a unique experience that others outside of the community usually do not understand. I help people with handling the unique stressors and traumas of serving as well as providing support and guidance during transition outside of military service. I have lived experience and training in supporting this community.

— Joshua Manney, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Ventura, CA
 

As a military retiree, I am familiar with the military life experience. You can feel safe and supported in the therapeutic space. You can take the first step towards hope and healing whether you are experiencing symptoms of trauma from PTSD, sexual abuse, anxiety, depression, or grief. You might also be struggling as you transition from military to civilian life. This can be a time of confusion for you and your family. You don't have to make this journey by yourself. Please contact me.

— Liliana Ramos, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Jose, CA

As a military retiree, I am familiar with the military life experience. You can feel safe and supported in the therapeutic space. You can take the first step towards hope and healing whether you are experiencing symptoms of trauma from PTSD, sexual abuse, anxiety, depression, or grief. You might also be struggling as you transition from military to civilian life. This can be a time of confusion for you and your family. You don't have to make this journey by yourself.

— Liliana Ramos, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Jose, CA
 

I spent 18 months at Mt. Carmel Veterans Service Center working with military servicemembers, veterans, and their families. I've learned the unique aspects of military culture and how the culture impacts veterans - even those who don't have PTSD. I'm able to work with high-achievers to be able to maintain their skills set while development mindfulness and coping mechanisms for civilian life.

— Stacy Andrews, Mental Health Counselor in Colorado Springs, CO

I am a veteran and can understand the lifestyle and challenges that are connected with such a lifestyle.

— Mareba Lewis, Licensed Professional Counselor in Conyers, GA
 

Like any other type of trauma, MST can seriously affect a person’s physical and mental health, causing anxiety attacks, depression, and substance abuse if untreated. In addition, unprocessed military sexual trauma can cause a variety of relationship and/or family problems as well as social functioning difficulties in general. Veterans who have experienced MST commonly report problems with interpersonal relationships, depression, anxiety and PTSD.

— Filippo M. Forni, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

As a Veteran of the USMC and current member of the MN Army National Guard having served on three deployments, I know the struggles of military members and their families. I understand what it is like to want to talk about your experiences and not have someone cringe, or ask all kinds of questions about what the acronyms are/mean. I get that we do not all have PTSD, and that we may just be having "normal" struggles like everyone else. But if you do have trauma, we will address it.

— Eric Strom, Clinical Social Worker in Minnetonka, MN
 

Retired disabled combat veteran with over 20 years experience within the military community.

— Erick Sowell, Clinical Social Worker in Owings Mills, MD

As an Air Force Veteran, I have worked with Active Duty service members, Veterans, and their families.

— Krystal Smith, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

I am a Veteran and have deployment experience as a civilian. I am completed Tier I, II, and III of the Start Behavioral Health program created by the Uniformed Service University and Center for Deployment Psychology. Also, I have complete various trainings to include Military Sexual Trauma and Military Couples Counseling.

— Michele Yurgin, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Rainier, OR

Having served our country for ten years in the Navy, I understand the sacrifices made within serving our country as well as within our personal lives and family units. I desired a level of service while in service I had not received and I now pride myself on being able to provide that very service to the men and women who serve, as well as those who have previously served our country.

— Michael Love, Registered Clinical Social Worker Intern in Jacksonville, FL
 

I am an Air Force veteran, married to a Marine Corps veteran.

— Mary Jarnagin, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Lexington, KY