LGBTQ Issues

Just like any other group, the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning (LGBTQ) community faces mental health issues and unique challenges. However, LGBTQ individuals are almost 3 times more likely than others to experience a mental health condition, such as depression or anxiety. Additionally, more than half of individuals who identify as transgender experience depression or anxiety. The LGBTQ community is also at a higher risk for suicide. Young people are even more at risk, as they may experience a lack of support at home and fear, hatred or prejudice in school. If you are a member of the LGBTQ community and are facing mental health challenges, you don’t have to suffer in silence. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s LGBTQ experts and get help today.

Meet the specialists

I came out queer in 1995 at age 17. I have been an active member of LGBTQ+ communities in several states and many local areas since then. My immediate family currently includes a transman, transwomen, and nonbinary people in addition to gay, lesbian, and bi/pansexual people. I am happy to support LGBTQ+ clients through various challenges, including: navigating family of origin, creating or expanding chosen family, building or rebuilding support systems, work-life balance, isolation, etc.

— Caera Gramore, Mental Health Practitioner in Arlington, WA
 

The LGBTQ person has a plethora of shame based internalized messages of devaluation. If you choose to move into a path of knowing who you are with the backdrop inherent worth and connection, we can help.

— Antonia Allison, Marriage & Family Therapist in Diamond Bar, CA

I'm a LGBT communjty member, have volunteered with gay rights non-profits, and centered my clinical specialty on LGBT studies as I earned my Master's degree.

— Andrew Amick, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Valley Village, CA
 

LGBTQI youth who experience family rejection, bullying and violence in school, work, or their community are at an increased rate of engaging in suicidal behavior. Older LGBTQI persons, regarded as an invisible population, report experiences of grief, isolation, elder abuse, and barriers in accessing health care. Acts of violence occur towards transgender persons in the United States of American every two minutes. Many of these acts of violence go unreported due to the sense of fear.

— Alyx MacTernan, Counselor in , CA

I am a member of the LGBTQIA+ community and I have experience working with clients across the spectrum. Whether or not you are experiencing issues directly related to your gender or sexuality, I aim to provide a safe place for all my clients to be open and supported, no matter where you are in your journey to understanding yourself and your identity.

— Stacy Marshall, Licensed Professional Counselor in Dallas, TX
 

As a member of this community (as with the other communities I serve) I have lived experience of the microaggressions and struggles faced by the LGBTQIA+ or SAGA community when attempting to access mental health care. I provide a sex positive and affirming space to explore all aspects of sexuality, gender, and relationship, but also understand the ways in which simply belonging to this community impacts other aspects of a person's life.

— Farrah Bonnot, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Denton, TX

Although I am an ally, I'm not directly in the LGTBQ community; however I'm incredibly supportive, understanding, and open to all persons, lifestyles, and sexualities. I've had the pleasure of gaining more and more persons that are non-binary / transgender over the years and it seems to be a population that can be benefited from my services.

— Danielle Eaton, Counselor
 

Whether it's coming out, working through family dynamics, sex related concerns or even insecurities about entering into a community that is loving and supportive but sometimes emotionally taxing, there is a need to work through these emotions appropriately and effectively. Together we can discuss and problem solve issues related to being in the LGBTQIA+ community.

— Miguel Lopez, Licensed Professional Counselor in Fort Worth, TX

Everyone has the answers that they need in their hearts; in their bodies. As clinicians, our job is to ask questions, express observations, and be a witness to the unfolding of answers that existed long before you meet us. As QTPOC therapist, I am here to support you in asking your questions and standing in your truth without judgement or shame. Your healing is more important than any bias or any fragility that you may encounter from a provider who can’t look past their own limitations.

— Julius Peterson, Clinical Social Worker in Decatur, GA
 

As a member of this community (as with the other communities I serve) I have lived experience of the microaggressions and struggles faced by the LGBTQIA+ or SAGA community when attempting to access mental health care. I provide a sex positive and affirming space to explore all aspects of sexuality, gender, and relationship, but also understand the ways in which simply belonging to this community impacts other aspects of a person's life.

— Farrah Bonnot, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Denton, TX

Has it been hard to find your place in the LGBTQIA+ community because of racism, transphobia, biphobia, aro/acephobia, sizeism, ableism, classism, and other -isms? Have you ever been isolated from community by an abusive partner or group of people? I will use nonjudgment and compassion to listen and help guide you in the directions that you want to heal and grow.

— Jessie Roffe, Counselor in Canton, MA
 

As a social justice driven, queer, non-binary human, I have an understanding of the mental, emotional, and spiritual toll that oppression takes. I believe cultural humility and taking systems into account is imperative in the therapeutic process and is something I intend to uphold in our time together.

— Jules Allison, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

As a member of the LGBTQ community I am aware of the issues around coming out, dealing with family members, reconciling spirituality with sexuality, and the ongoing challenges of living with intersectional marginalized identities.

— Kirsti Reeve, Licensed Professional Counselor in Royal Oak, MI
 

As a queer person in a straight-passing relationship, I recognize the privilege that I bring to the therapy room. In response, I work to continuously develop my knowledge base and "expertise" about both queer issues as well expansive relationships by engaging in continuing education, consultation and my clinical work. I see a large number of LGBTQ individuals and work to expand my personal network of friends and colleagues.

— Olivia Carollo, Clinical Psychologist in Chicago, IL

I have a strong focus on the LGBTQ* community, and offer a safe space to explore and better understand personal identity and expression, and help support individuals in identifying how they can live authentically and wholeheartedly.

— Amy Emery (not currently accepting new clients), Licensed Clinical Social Worker in , CT
 

I have been involved with the LGBTQ+ community since 1987. I began working with kids of LGBTQ parents when my own father came out and I co-founded COLAGE in 1990. I am EFT trained and work with LGBTQ couples and individuals.

— Dr. Ali Dubin, Counselor in North Hollywood, CA

As a member of the LGBTQ community myself, I not only feel a professional but also a personal responsibility to support this often under-served community, to provide a space of safety and security to explore issues connected to sexual identity, and of course issues NOT related to sexual identity that can be made that much more challenging for people who are in sexual minority communities. Providing an empowered space for clients to explore content is a cornerstone in my work.

— Joey Salvatore, Counselor in Baltimore, MD
 

LGBTQ individuals seek counseling for many reasons that may or may not be related to your sexuality or your gender identity. It is important that you have a therapist who you can discuss any area of your life without taking time to explain being LGBTQ. As a member of the LGBTQ community I have both the professional and personal expertise and experience to help you address the concerns you bring to counseling.

— Deborah Robinson-Thompson, Mental Health Counselor in Woburn, MA

Individuals who identify as LGBTQIA+ need a counselor who is understanding and an advocate in the community. I have worked with individuals who are not only looking for a safe place to talk about sexual identity and discrimination but who also want to discuss feelings of depression and anxiety. Let's work together to help you understand how you can feel safe and proud of who you are. Contact me to see if we would be a good fit for counseling.

— Cheryl Perry, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Charlotte, NC