LGBTQ Issues

Just like any other group, the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning (LGBTQ) community faces mental health issues and unique challenges. However, LGBTQ individuals are almost 3 times more likely than others to experience a mental health condition, such as depression or anxiety. Additionally, more than half of individuals who identify as transgender experience depression or anxiety. The LGBTQ community is also at a higher risk for suicide. Young people are even more at risk, as they may experience a lack of support at home and fear, hatred or prejudice in school. If you are a member of the LGBTQ community and are facing mental health challenges, you don’t have to suffer in silence. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s LGBTQ experts and get help today.

Meet the specialists

I have dedicated time and energy into education and practice being an ally. As someone who is also a member of the LGBTQ community, it is important to me that people feel safe, heard and understood.

— Katie Huskey, Counselor in Appleton, WI
 

Being a member of the LGBT community and also someone with an academic background in gender and LGBT issues, I understand both the personal and societal toll having a marginalized sexuality or gender identity can take on you. Despite this, I take a strengths-based perspective to highlight the available resiliency and community resources available to those in the LGBT community.

— Corinne (Kyriaki) Galatulas, Therapist in Garden City, NY

As a member of queer community myself, I know how important it is to find a therapist who'll welcome and recognize all the parts of you. My interests include questioning gender and/or sexual identity, exploring new facets of one's relationship to sex, asexuality, navigating non-traditional relationship structures (e.g. polyamory, Dominant/submissive, etc.), kink/BDSM, sex work, couples grappling with differences in desire, the impact of sexual trauma, and coping with isolation/lack of support.

— Abby Weintraub, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

I work primarily with queer and trans folks, and am myself a queer transwoman.

— Amina Elfiki, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in OAKLAND, CA

I'm A Gay Therapist, And I Have Been A Member Of Atlanta's LGBTQ Community For Over 20 Years. You can trust that my office is a place where you won't be judged for who you are, who you love, or how you live your life. You can also be assured that I am a therapist who gets what it's like to be gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender and that I am informed on the current issues we face both as individuals and as an LGBTQ community. It's safe to be yourself.

— Brian Gieringer, Marriage & Family Therapist in Atlanta, GA
 

I have deep familiarity and extensive experience working with members of the LGBTQ communities.

— Samuel Talone, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY

I am an LGBTQIA+ affirmative therapist and strive to help my LGBTQIA+ clients fully love their identities. Identifying as LGBTQIA+ can come with a wide range of issues, such as fear of coming out, anxiety, depression, feeling isolated and misunderstood, family issues, social issues, self esteem issues, substance use, and more. I am happy to work with LGBTQIA+ client individually or within the context of family therapy, but strive to find ways to increase support for the LGBTQIA+ person.

— Angela Shankman, Therapist in Agoura Hills, CA
 

Our sexual orientations, gender identities and expressions (SOGIE) are integral parts of how we know ourselves and relate to one another. In my practice, I embody a loving acceptance for who you are. Together, we may explore how the gender binary system, transphobia and homophobia have inflicted harm. We may also draw upon your inner wisdom to move towards healing from these wounds.

— Ashley Gregory, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

For many queer people, finding a health care practitioner can be a daunting task. You must take into account many questions: Do I feel safe with them? Will they understand my worldview and my experiences? Do I have to educate them on the social structures which are inherent in my life? Will I be labeled as sick or abnormal? As a queer person myself I can relate to the feelings all of these questions bring up. As a therapist I strive to make sure my clients feel safe, comfortable & understood.

— Nick Venegoni, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

I have worked with the LGBT+ community since I began practicing at an LGBT+ focused counseling center 13+ years ago.

— Jill Pressley, Counselor in Austin, TX

As a member of queer community myself, I know how important it is to find a therapist who'll welcome and recognize all the parts of you. My interests include questioning gender and/or sexual identity, exploring new facets of one's relationship to sex, asexuality, navigating non-traditional relationship structures (e.g. polyamory, Dominant/submissive, etc.), kink/BDSM, sex work, couples grappling with differences in desire, the impact of sexual trauma, and coping with isolation/lack of support.

— Abby Weintraub, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

As a member and advocate of the LGBTQIA community I am truly passionate about working with other individuals who identify or are allied with the community. Many issues that individuals a part of the community can deal with is gender identify, social injustices, and discrimination. I want to be able to provide a safe space for my clients to express themselves and feel no judgement when exploring who they are.

— Tristin Malone, Therapist in Laurel, MD
 

I believe that many of the LGBTQ issues are issues in which society has made into LGBTQ issues. I have worked with many in the community to help them work with coming out to families, moving forward in the transition process, and dealing with their own internal struggles.

— Tara Clifford, Licensed Professional Counselor in Fort Smith, AR

I center LGBTQ+ folx in my practice and have long moved through the world in way that seeks to honor and uplift the lives of queer people. My building, office, work and humanness are committed to making sacred space for all people amidst the spectrums of gender and sexuality. Note: I embrace the word queer yet understand that's not true for all--I will ask about, follow and honor your language and experience.

— Kelly Storck, Counselor in St. Louis, MO
 

I have over 25 years of experience working with the LGBTQ+ community in a variety of roles. As a psychotherapist, it is my passion to create a safe and affirming space for LGBTQ+ youth and adults. If you are seeking therapy for gender and sexual identity issues or just want a safe space to be you to address other life challenges, I am here to support you.

— Jennifer Rickard, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA
 

Specialize in working with couples and multi-partner relationships on communication issues, relational issues, rebuilding trust, reducing conflict, codependency, and managing needs within a relationship. Collaborate WITH you to find solutions to your problems because everyone has their own strengths to bring to the table. Include a focus on holistic healing, such as mindfulness and meditation, in treatment. LGBTQ-affirmative, polyamory-affirmative, and kink-aware

— A Compass Within, Mental Health Counselor in Rochester, MI

As part of the LGBTQ community our issues are near and dear to my heart! I love working with "family." Minority stress is real! Many of us have suffered trauma of one kind or another. I believe the "work" that we do to figure out who we are (and how to survive an environment that is often hostile) contributes to our resilience. My internship was at Affirmations LGBT Community Center, where I learned a great deal about the issues we face as a community and how to overcome them,

— Paula Kirsch, Clinical Social Worker in Detroit, MI
 

I specialize in working with LGBTQIA+ individuals and couples and subspecialize in working with intersex individuals. I am also a member of WPATH and can assist those individuals requiring a pre-surgical assessment for gender affirming surgeries. My approach to such letters is to assume that you know yourself best (unless you are asking for assistance exploring your identity) and that my role is to focus on assessing medical decision making capacity and to advocate for medical necessity.

— Matthew Malouf, Psychologist in Baltimore, MD
 

We’ve made great strides as a society towards accepting ways of loving that fall outside the rigid binary that has long dominated the social order. But, we have a looooong long way to go towards fully accepting, embracing, and honoring the spectrum of sexual expression that makes human kind so interesting, rich, and diverse. Therapy is a space to recover, heal, and reclaim the parts of yourself that this world so sadly didn’t celebrate as it should have.

— Ben Greenberg, PsyD, Clinical Psychologist in Athens, GA

I have extensive experience working with people who identify as LGBTQ and their allies. During my career I have worked with many clients who are seeking support around some facet of their sexual orientation, as well as clients who are not looking for support with their sexuality specifically, but who want a therapist that "gets them."

— Megan McDavid, Sex Therapist in Portland, OR