Self-Harm

Self-harm, also known as self-injury, means hurting yourself on purpose. While cutting (using a sharp object to pierce your skin) is the most common form of self-harm many other forms exist, including burning, scratching or hitting body parts. Self-harm often first manifests itself in adolescence or young adulthood and is typically used as a way to cope with emotional pain. Individuals who have experienced trauma, neglect or abuse are particularly susceptible to self-harming behaviors. Self-harm can be a passing phase, but it is sometimes a symptom of a more serious psychiatric problem, like anxiety, depression, borderline personality disorder, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia, so it is important to take it seriously. Whether you, or a child in your care, has recently started hurting yourself or you’ve been doing it for a while, there is help available! Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s self-harm experts today.

Meet the specialists

I work with teenagers and adults who use all sorts of behaviors to try to feel better, even when they know those behaviors are hurtful to themselves or others, or aren't in line with their values. I have worked with self-harm, thoughts of suicide, and emotional dysregulation in inpatient and outpatient settings. I rely on behavioral and emotional strategies to help you understand why you're using these behaviors and what to do instead.

— Tricia Mihal, Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX