Person-Centered (Rogerian)

Person-centered therapy, also sometimes called Rogerian therapy or client-centered therapy, was first developed by Carl Rogers in the 1940s. Person-centered therapy borrows from humanistic approaches and is based on Rogers’ belief that all people are fundamentally good and have the ability to fulfill their potential. In person-centered therapy, clients will typically take more of a lead in sessions, with the therapist acting as a compassionate, non-judgmental facilitator. The idea is that, in the process, the client will steer their own journey of self-discovery and will find their own solutions. Think this approach might work for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s person-centered therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

 

Treatment orientations were super cool in Graduate school and make for some pretty heated arguments during lunch. But when you (as a therapist) sit down with a client, you need to let that all go. To meet a client where they are, to offer support, to lean in and totally align with them in the struggle of life - that's the work. Everything else is just stuff you learn about when you need continuing education credits.

— Scott Levenberg, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in LOS ANGELES, CA

First and foremost, I believe in the capacity of all people for self-healing and personal growth. Through building a strong therapeutic alliance with my clients, I am able to create an environment of trust and safety where expression of life events is not only encouraged, but received without fear or judgment. I provide empathic understanding so that we can work together on your goals.

— Cyndy Rehberg, Licensed Professional Counselor in Fort Collins, CO
 

You can expect unconditional positive regard, empathy, and transparency. By way of talk therapy, individuals experience an increased understanding and awareness of self. Outcomes include improved mood, positive attitude and a better outlook, an increased capacity to express feelings, and greater self esteem.

— Robin Leichtman, Counselor in Lyndhurst, OH
 

I believe that therapy should be client-directed. Using Rogerian therapy, I am able listen in an unbiased, nonjudgemental manner, letting you tell me about what is happening in your life. I strive to create an empathetic environment that allows you to explore and find the answers to many of the struggles you may be facing. I want you to feel at your most comfortable when we are meeting.

— Ande Cappellano, Social Worker in Portland, OR

This was my primary focus in Graduate School. I believe building the client-therapist relationship first is central to accelerating therapy. I am committed to the unconditional positive regard foundation of this therapy.

— Jaclin Belabri, Counselor in Vancouver, WA

In my Masters program, Person-centered therapy was the foundational theory that I was trained in for over of 3 years. I came to love it, because it emphasizes that the client is the master of their own world and the clinician is there to help guide them. I value the core concepts of acceptance, being non-judgmental, unconditional positive regard and empathy. By sticking to these values, I believe that a trusting, working relationship can be built and used as a powerful therapeutic tool.

— SkyeBlu Cutchie, Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

My undergraduate and graduate education in social work provided extensive training on person-centered therapy. I draw on this approach to empower clients and to encourage self-determination both in their counseling sessions and in their lives. I provide a compassionate and empathetic environment which enables clients to discover their many strengths and use them to meet their goals.

— Chelsea Kazmier, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Satellite Beach, FL
 

First and foremost, I believe in the capacity of all people for self-healing and personal growth. Through building a strong therapeutic alliance with my clients, I am able to create an environment of trust and safety where expression of life events is not only encouraged, but received without fear or judgment. I provide empathic understanding so that we can work together on your goals.

— Cyndy Rehberg, Licensed Professional Counselor in Fort Collins, CO
 

Person-centered and other humanistic approaches are a through line in my work as a therapist. My relationship with my clients is the most important aspect of the work we do and I approach it with genuineness and unconditional positive regard.

— Tonia Herrero, Art Therapist in Oakland, CA

I have implemented person-centered therapy since I started practicing therapy in 2011. I have experience using this methodology with individuals and groups. I have found it to be helpful when dealing with anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and various other mental health issues.

— Gina Marquardt, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in ,
 

I am not the expert on you and your life. You are the captain of your vessel. I am simply accompanying you on part of your journey. Your experiences, thoughts, and feelings are valid and important. I am here to witness and affirm that, and to reflect the inner wisdom you already have that can be further developed and strengthened.

— Kimberly Watts Hoggatt, Licensed Professional Counselor in San Antonio, TX
 

Person-Centered Therapy shows up in the way I see you. You can expect to be treated with unconditional positive regard, meaning I will see you as inherently good and accept you without any action or behavior needed on your part. I will try to see things from your perspective; to understand where you are coming from. You can expect for me to show up authentically. This means that I will be real with you; that my facial expressions and words will reflect my actual felt experience in the moment.

— Melissa Hartley, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

Meeting people where they are is the heart of Rogerian and other Person-Centered therapeutic approaches. I don't start out trying to understand how a person's experiences can be understood as a disease or a disorder, instead, I try to humbly understand their experiences and then reflect on how they can be viewed through various psychological lenses.

— Charles Thompson-Shealy, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Kingston, NY