Person-Centered (Rogerian)

Person-centered therapy, also sometimes called Rogerian therapy or client-centered therapy, was first developed by Carl Rogers in the 1940s. Person-centered therapy borrows from humanistic approaches and is based on Rogers’ belief that all people are fundamentally good and have the ability to fulfill their potential. In person-centered therapy, clients will typically take more of a lead in sessions, with the therapist acting as a compassionate, non-judgmental facilitator. The idea is that, in the process, the client will steer their own journey of self-discovery and will find their own solutions. Think this approach might work for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s person-centered therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

I believe you to be the expert of your experience with all the seeds inside you necessary for you to become the person you wish. The pace and style of our work is tailored to you uniquely. I follow your lead on our journey, while acting as ally and guide to keep us the path to the goals you have identified.

— Jennifer Alt, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
 

I believe every person knows on some level what they need and the steps they need to take to find healing or create change. Each person also knows what they are ready to address past traumas or current struggles. I respect each person's process and knowledge of themselves and experiences. Sometimes simply having a place to process our emotions, explore our inner workings, and affirm our experiences lead to breakthroughs.

— Heather Romero, Counselor in Atlanta, GA

I believe every person knows on some level what they need and the steps they need to take to find healing or create change. Each person also knows what they are ready to address past traumas or current struggles. I respect each person's process and knowledge of themselves and experiences. Sometimes simply having a place to process our emotions, explore our inner workings, and affirm our experiences lead to breakthroughs.

— Heather Romero, Counselor in Atlanta, GA
 

As a Person-Centered therapist I strive to create a therapeutic environment that fosters acceptance, congruence, unconditional positive regard, and empathy. As a Person-Centered therapist I believe that clients possess the necessary tools to create the change they desire. I work collaboratively with clients to help them re-author their personal narratives to realize their own potential for growth and develop greater congruence within themselves.

— Dan Schmitt, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Eugene, OR

The therpeuctic alliance is the heart of the therapy process. A deep connection between the therapist and client provides a fertile ground for real change and progress.

— Jennifer Driscoll, Counselor in Mamaroneck, NY
 

I believe that each person is the best authority on themselves. With a person centered approach, the client is the most important person in the therapeutic relationship and plays a major role in guiding the therapeutic relationship and the therapeutic process. By partnering with my clients and giving them the ability to get to know themselves, they are able to make genuine connections with themselves which extends to more genuine connections with others.

— Jacob Butler, Counselor in Canadian, OK

My graduate education was focused in person-centered therapy. I believe the client is the expert on their life story. I collaborate with my clients to guide them on their healing jouney.

— Rebecca Dorfman, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Tustin, CA
 

I have been trained to help you determine whether to adapt to or accept situations by the way you interpret your emotions, cognitions, and behaviors. This helps you bring meaning to your life which leads to self-actualization. I have been helping people grow, develop, and learn to be autonomous. My non-directive approach here provides awareness to you through reflection and by helping you with effective information processing.

— Alan Zupka, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in ORLANDO, FL

For me, Person-Centered therapy is all about my people. That means the whole person & their whole life. We won't just look at the problems and the struggles, we'll start where you are today & look at your gifts, your strengths, & who you are to personalize your care down to the detail. Person-Centered therapy centers around unconditional positive regard, genuineness, & non-judgemental space between the therapist and their patient. So you can "dare" to be your best self!

— Helen Jennings-Hood, Psychotherapist in Wynne, AR
 

Research shows that the quality of the therapeutic relationship is the most pivotal factor in the success or failure of treatment. The three core conditions of the Person-Centered approach are unconditional positive regard, empathy and authenticity and set the stage for an effective therapeutic alliance. I strive to communicate these qualities to my clients to encourage trust and transparency resulting in growth and healing.

— Jennifer Durbin, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Fullerton, CA

Therapy would not exist without the relationship between therapist and client. Carl Rogers believed in exhibiting positive regard to all those who sat in front of him. The client is the expert on their own story.

— Michelle North, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encinitas, CA
 

When we meet, I start building the therapeutic relationship with clients by asking questions and discussing how they see themselves and their situation. I may have ideas for a plan to help them meet their goals, but what's most important is to meet them where they are and stay focused on their priorities and expectations. I'm continuously doing my best to reflect and check my own biases to ensure I remain nonjudgmental in my interactions with my clients.

— Kayce Hodos, Counselor in Wake Forest, NC

With kids, teens, and adults I tailor my sessions to the individual and let them lead with what they find most important. I use a variety of approaches to help support clients in the best way for each individual. Therapy with me is a safe space for clients to be accepted and be themselves. My clients describe me as calm, caring, heartwarming, and supportive. I am also empathetic and practical. I aim to be insightful, reassuring, and non-judgmental.

— Jenna Wonish-Mottin, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in The Woodlands, TX