Person-Centered (Rogerian)

Person-centered therapy, also sometimes called Rogerian therapy or client-centered therapy, was first developed by Carl Rogers in the 1940s. Person-centered therapy borrows from humanistic approaches and is based on Rogers’ belief that all people are fundamentally good and have the ability to fulfill their potential. In person-centered therapy, clients will typically take more of a lead in sessions, with the therapist acting as a compassionate, non-judgmental facilitator. The idea is that, in the process, the client will steer their own journey of self-discovery and will find their own solutions. Think this approach might work for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s person-centered therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

For me, Person-Centered therapy is all about my people. That means the whole person & their whole life. We won't just look at the problems and the struggles, we'll start where you are today & look at your gifts, your strengths, & who you are to personalize your care down to the detail. Person-Centered therapy centers around unconditional positive regard, genuineness, & non-judgemental space between the therapist and their patient. So you can "dare" to be your best self!

— Helen Jennings-Hood, Psychotherapist in Wynne, AR
 

I prefer an egalitarian approach where you and I create a space together that allows for open, honest communication, exploration and understanding.

— Gina Holden, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA

I always put the individual and their experience first. Creating a warm, affirming, and supportive environment based on trust and respect is very important in a successful counseling relationship.

— Ashley Sanders, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Maitland, FL
 

I believe in each persons individual and unique way of experiencing their lives. By creating a space for independence, promoting their dignity and respecting their values, my clients feels supported and understood. They are validated in who they are and the decisions they make in life.

— Artur Lebiedzinski, Psychotherapist in New York, NY

The therpeuctic alliance is the heart of the therapy process. A deep connection between the therapist and client provides a fertile ground for real change and progress.

— Jennifer Driscoll, Counselor in Mamaroneck, NY
 

Person-Centered therapy works to empower you and motivate you in the therapeutic process. Instead of viewing you as flawed, person-centered therapy focuses on your ability and desire for change and personal growth. Focusing on compassion and a nonjudgemental approach, you can focus on your journey of self-discovery and find your own solutions.

— Emmily Weldon, Counselor in Port St. Lucie, FL

I use Person-Centered therapy as my foundation as I believe you are the expert of your life and I am here to be your support. I'll help you iron out the wrinkles so that you can better able to understand yourself and meet your goals of therapy.

— Misty Gibson, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Tacoma, WA
 

An emphatic approach that empowers and motivates the client in the therapeutic process. Rather than viewing people as inherently flawed, with problematic behaviors and thoughts that require treatment, person-centered therapy identifies that each person has the capacity and desire for personal growth and change.

— Jennifer Harvey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Livonia, MI

I believe in each persons individual and unique way of experiencing their lives. By creating a space for independence, promoting their dignity and respecting their values, my clients feels supported and understood. They are validated in who they are and the decisions they make in life.

— Artur Lebiedzinski, Psychotherapist in New York, NY
 

I work from an integrated, trauma-informed, person-centered approach. I believe you are the expert in your experience - even when everything feels confusing and difficult. I am a relational facilitator, here to support you on own path. Together we will co-create a brave and safe enough space to process, heal, create goals, and succeed in ways that are meaningful to you.

— Johanna Karasik, Therapist in Northglenn, CO

In person-centered therapy, the focus is on the person, not the problem. The goal is for the client to achieve greater independence. This will allow the client to better cope with any current and future problems they may face. In other words, a Person-Centered approach is about ensuring that patients are at the center of decisions which relate to their life. A person-centered process involves listening, thinking together, coaching, sharing ideas, and seeking feedback.

— Filippo M. Forni, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Approach therapy through a strength-based, person-centered, relational way

— Sammy Kirk, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

Above all else, I feel the relationship formed in therapy to be the most healing agent for change. I offer my clients a compassionate, nonjudgmental, and curious atmosphere to explore themselves.

— Justin Fink, Licensed Professional Counselor in Hoffman Estates, IL