Person-Centered (Rogerian)

Person-centered therapy, also sometimes called Rogerian therapy or client-centered therapy, was first developed by Carl Rogers in the 1940s. Person-centered therapy borrows from humanistic approaches and is based on Rogers’ belief that all people are fundamentally good and have the ability to fulfill their potential. In person-centered therapy, clients will typically take more of a lead in sessions, with the therapist acting as a compassionate, non-judgmental facilitator. The idea is that, in the process, the client will steer their own journey of self-discovery and will find their own solutions. Think this approach might work for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s person-centered therapy experts today.

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Person-centered therapy uses a non-authoritative approach that allows clients to take more of a lead in discussions so that, in the process, they will discover their own solutions. The therapist acts as a compassionate facilitator, listening without judgment and acknowledging the client’s experience without moving the conversation in another direction.

— Amelia Jayanty, Therapist in San Francisco, CA

I believe that in order for a therapeutic relationship to thrive, it needs to be built on a foundation of non-judgment and trust. I also believe that the client knows themselves best, and my job is to facilitate your ability to reflect and process.

— Eliza McBride, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Beaverton, OR
 

Person-centered therapy, also called Rogerian therapy, was first developed by Carl Rogers in the 1940s. Person-centered therapy borrows from humanistic approaches and is based on the belief that all people are fundamentally good and have the ability to fulfill their potential. In person-centered therapy, clients will typically take more of a lead in sessions, with the therapist acting as a compassionate, non-judgmental facilitator to guide the client to find their own goals and solutions.

— Colby Schneider, Marriage and Family Therapist Associate in Portland, OR

Extensive experience in providing person centered care in residential and hospital facilities and community mental health.

— Jenine Stallings, Licensed Professional Counselor in Mechanicsville, VA
 

I believe you to be the expert of your experience with all the seeds inside you necessary for you to become the person you wish. The pace and style of our work is tailored to you uniquely. I follow your lead on our journey, while acting as ally and guide to keep us the path to the goals you have identified.

— Jennifer Alt, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist

Person-Centered therapy works to empower you and motivate you in the therapeutic process. Instead of viewing you as flawed, person-centered therapy focuses on your ability and desire for change and personal growth. Focusing on compassion and a nonjudgemental approach, you can focus on your journey of self-discovery and find your own solutions.

— Emmily Weldon, Counselor in Port St. Lucie, FL
 

As a person-centered provider I meet my clients as they are and collaborate with them to make common goals that feel obtainable and congruent. You will be met with a non-judgmental and compassionate approach with respect to your own beliefs and perspectives.

— Kassondra Wilson, Mental Health Counselor in , WA

This all begins (for my clients) in-session with Person-Centered (Rogerian) therapy, because arguably no other modality is better at establishing the beginning (and cultivating) what we refer to as the therapeutic alliance (relationship). Most in this field will agree that without the therapeutic rapport there is no real counseling taking place, and without it the client would basically be wasting their time on that couch.

— Dennis Smith, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Las Vegas, NV
 

I believe in each persons individual and unique way of experiencing their lives. By creating a space for independence, promoting their dignity and respecting their values, my clients feels supported and understood. They are validated in who they are and the decisions they make in life.

— Artur Lebiedzinski, Psychotherapist in New York, NY

I received in-depth academic and experiential training in Person-Centered (Rogerian) Therapy throughout my graduate program at Cleveland State, and used that approach almost exclusively during my 700-hour graduate internship.

— Megan Matthews, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Lakewood, OH
 

Approach therapy through a strength-based, person-centered, relational way

— Sammy Kirk, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

My graduate education was focused in person-centered therapy. I believe the client is the expert on their life story. I collaborate with my clients to guide them on their healing jouney.

— Rebecca Dorfman, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Tustin, CA
 

Person-centered therapy is non-directive. I won't take charge and tell you what you should do. Instead, I will ask gentle questions and listen carefully to your answers, reflect back what I hear, share my observations, and help you to find the answers that are already inside you. In this type of therapy, you are the expert in you. Additionally, I practice Compassion-Focused Therapy which was not an option for me to indicate. CFT can help you change your relationship with your inner critic.

— Alicia Polk, Licensed Professional Counselor in Belton, MO

When we meet, I start building the therapeutic relationship with clients by asking questions and discussing how they see themselves and their situation. I may have ideas for a plan to help them meet their goals, but what's most important is to meet them where they are and stay focused on their priorities and expectations. I'm continuously doing my best to reflect and check my own biases to ensure I remain nonjudgmental in my interactions with my clients.

— Kayce Hodos, Counselor in Wake Forest, NC