Person-Centered (Rogerian)

Person-centered therapy, also sometimes called Rogerian therapy or client-centered therapy, was first developed by Carl Rogers in the 1940s. Person-centered therapy borrows from humanistic approaches and is based on Rogers’ belief that all people are fundamentally good and have the ability to fulfill their potential. In person-centered therapy, clients will typically take more of a lead in sessions, with the therapist acting as a compassionate, non-judgmental facilitator. The idea is that, in the process, the client will steer their own journey of self-discovery and will find their own solutions. Think this approach might work for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s person-centered therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

 

Carl Rogers got it right. 1. Congruance 2. Empathy And 3. Unconditional Positive Regard are my three main tools. I was fortunate enough to do indepth studies of Person-Centered theory with many of the students of Natalie Rogers.

— Genevieve Saenz, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

I have been trained to help you determine whether to adapt to or accept situations by the way you interpret your emotions, cognitions, and behaviors. This helps you bring meaning to your life which leads to self-actualization. I have been helping people grow, develop, and learn to be autonomous. My non-directive approach here provides awareness to you through reflection and by helping you with effective information processing.

— Alan Zupka, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in ORLANDO, FL
 

My clinical training is built on a foundation of Rogerian techniques. I began my career in intensive crisis intervention training from Mental Health America which was based entirely on Rogerian theory and skills. Person-centered therapy operates on the concept that the client is the expert of their own experience and the therapist can help by creating a safe environment in which both therapist and client can be open and authentic.

— Laura Angelucci, Therapist in Austell, GA

You come first, that is a golden rule of mine in counseling. When you sit down with me in the therapy room the floor is yours, so first and foremost it is my duty to help you realize that. In our day-to-day life there is not much, if any, time for that to be acknowledged; that our own well-being and mental state comes before being able to help others.

— Austin Knight, Counselor in Grand Rapids, MI

In person-centered therapy, the focus is on the person, not the problem. The goal is for the client to achieve greater independence. This will allow the client to better cope with any current and future problems they may face. In other words, a Person Centered approach is about ensuring that patients are at the center of decisions which relate to their life. A person centred process involves listening, thinking together, coaching, sharing ideas, and seeking feedback.

— Filippo M. Forni, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Person-centered therapy, also referred to as Rogerian therapy, was developed and cultivated by psychologist Carl Rogers from the 1940s through the 1980s. The aim of person-centered therapy is to facilitate a client's innate drive toward personal growth and "self-actualization." This is done by providing the conditions now generally recognized by other therapeutic methods as necessary for change, including unconditional positive regard, therapist congruence (genuineness), and empathic understanding. Rogers is quoted as having said "I can't make corn grow, but I can provide the right soil and plant it in the right area and see that it gets enough water; I can nurture it so that exciting things happen. I think that's the nature of therapy."

— Barton Shulman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Francisco, CA
 

Person-Centered (Rogerian) Therapy was my focus throughout my graduate education and a focus of research, as well as work, since then. Through the use of honesty (both on your part and my own), empathy and a nondirective process led by you, we can identify and realize the inherent potential that is yours alone. I belong to Society for Humanistic Psychology and The Association for the Development of the Person-Centered Approach.

— Susan Rooney, Counselor in Portland, OR

A subset of Humanistic Therapy; Person-Centered Therapy relies on the relationship between you and me to help you rediscover your true identity. I do not find that judging you for your actions will help you in any way. Only through support and empathy can you really discover your true self.

— Kyle Stepler, Counselor in Greenwood, IN
 

I believe fully seeing someone and giving them the space and acceptance to be who they are is central to human connection and therefore, the foundation of all therapy.

— Steffanie Stecker, Counselor in Englewood, CO
 

The goal of this therapy is to provide you with an opportunity to develop a sense of self where you can realize how your attitudes, feelings and behavior are being negatively affected

— Kesha Martin, Counselor in San Antonio, TX

I resonate with the basic tenets of person-centered therapy, which include the therapist providing unconditional positive regard, or non-judgmental acceptance and support, empathetic understanding, and congruence (genuineness). This in turn provides an environment in which you can freely express yourself and discover paths for change and fulfillment. I draw from your expertise on yourself and your own life so that we can work as equal partners on what is troubling you.

— Courtney Wade, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Columbus, OH

When working with clients I believe that it’s important to look at the whole context of life – family, work, finances, physical health – as well as broader currents in society – the pressures to be successful, or to achieve a certain lifestyle – in order to understand how problems have formed.

— Peter Rivkees, Counselor in Clermont, FL

I approach all my sessions with a person-centered approach and the goal of offering each client my unconditional positive regard. This means that I see each client as valuable, worthy of respect, and doing the best they can with what they have.

— Rena McGrath, Licensed Professional Counselor in Salem, OR

Every one of us has a drive toward healing and growth. Therapy provides a relationship and an environment where you can learn to trust yourself, trust your experience, accept yourself more fully, and ultimately move toward a more authentic you.

— Sarah McIntyre, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX
 

This was my primary focus in Graduate School. I believe building the client-therapist relationship first is central to accelerating therapy. I am committed to the unconditional positive regard foundation of this therapy.

— Jaclin Belabri, Counselor in Vancouver, WA

I believe that therapy should be client-directed. Using Rogerian therapy, I am able listen in an unbiased, nonjudgemental manner, letting you tell me about what is happening in your life. I strive to create an empathetic environment that allows you to explore and find the answers to many of the struggles you may be facing. I want you to feel at your most comfortable when we are meeting.

— Ande Cappellano, Social Worker in Portland, OR
 

I believe that therapy should be client-directed. Using Rogerian therapy, I am able listen in an unbiased, nonjudgemental manner, letting you tell me about what is happening in your life. I strive to create an empathetic environment that allows you to explore and find the answers to many of the struggles you may be facing. I want you to feel at your most comfortable when we are meeting.

— Ande Cappellano, Social Worker in Portland, OR

Taking on the role of a coach or a guide, helping the client to find methods of change for themselves. This process has helped the client to boost their self-esteem, improve their sense of self-worth, and empower & trust themselves them to make healthy decisions.

— Edwyna Piert, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Long Beach, CA
 

Person-centered therapy is important because I believe that the therapeutic relationship is the main healing component. How many times have you met a therapist or helping professional that you didn't connect with or trust entirely? I'd go out on a limb and say that the therapy wasn't effective or you didn't go back. I know this well, I've done it myself as a client. Building rapport takes time and patience, but I truly believe that it is the catalyst to all healing.

— Patrick Casale, Counselor in asheville, NC
 

I believe that therapy should be client-directed. Using Rogerian therapy, I am able listen in an unbiased, nonjudgemental manner, letting you tell me about what is happening in your life. I strive to create an empathetic environment that allows you to explore and find the answers to many of the struggles you may be facing.

— Ande Cappellano, Social Worker in Portland, OR
 

Person-Centered therapy started early in my training and education and found that it has been a very effective foundation for treatment. I believe mental health treatment should be about you- where you choose your own goals. This approach allows you the ability to make choices for your treatment. We will develop specific goals for your needs and spend time reviewing preparedness for them as well as aiming for goals within your reach.

— Sheilagh McGreal, Creative Art Therapist in Rochester,