Relational Therapy

Relational therapy is a therapeutic approach that was founded on the belief that a person must have fulfilling and satisfying relationships with the people around them in order to be emotionally healthy. Relational therapy handles emotional and psychological distress by looking at the client’s patterns of behavior and experiences in interpersonal relationships, taking social factors, such as race, class, culture, and gender, into account. Relational therapy can be useful in the treatment of many issues, but is especially successful when working with individuals seeking to address long-term emotional distress, particularly when that distress related to relationships. Relational therapy will help clients learn skills to create and maintain healthy relationships. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s relational therapy experts today.

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A relational approach to therapy means that I will operate as an active participant in your therapy. The foundation of this work is the relationship between you and I and the dynamics that manifest during our sessions as they illuminate and relate to your other relationships. I often use the immediacy of the therapeutic relationship with the goal of increasing awareness and discovering previously hidden processes and beliefs that undermine well-being.

— Matthew Beeble, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Vancouver, WA

I was trained primarily in a Relational approach to therapy. I love the relational approach because it allows the therapeutic relationship to become a place where we can explore the dynamics that are at play in a client's other relationships in real time during the therapy hour, which I believe can be a truly transformative experience.

— Ashley Eisenlohr, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Everett, WA
 

A relational approach to therapy means that I will operate as an active participant in your therapy. The foundation of this work is the relationship between you and I and the dynamics that manifest during our sessions as they illuminate and relate to your other relationships. I often use the immediacy of the therapeutic relationship with the goal of increasing awareness and discovering previously hidden processes and beliefs that undermine well-being.

— Matthew Beeble, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Vancouver, WA

As a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and Certified Sex Therapist, most of my training has been in working with couples and individuals on relational concerns. When I am meeting with a couple or an individual, I am always thinking about emotional wellness within the context of the relationships. I have training in Gottman Couples Therapy, Emotionally Focused Therapy for Couples, ACT Therapy for Couples, working with open relationships and addressing sexual concerns in relationship therapy

— Kori Hennessy, Addictions Counselor in minneapolis, MN
 

Our relationships with our partners, friendships, & selves are deeply connected to whether we felt heard, understood, & safe growing up. I provide individual & relational therapy with the goal of understanding this context & how it impacts us in order to effectively address problems that you're experiencing today.

— MacKenzie Knapp, Marriage & Family Therapist in Tacoma, WA

Relational therapy is all about how you show up in your life- how your identities interact within your relationships and day to day life. The important piece of this is that we will build rapport, a therapeutic relationship, in order to do work together! It's pretty awesome.

— Elaina Vig, Licensed Clinical Social Worker - Candidate in Saint Louis Park, MN
 

Embracing what happens between us as valuable information needed in our understanding of you and your opportunities for growth and healing.

— David Brown, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

Relational therapy can help individuals recognize the role relationships play in the shaping of daily experiences, attempts to help people understand patterns appearing in the thoughts and feelings they have toward themselves. Based on the idea that strong and fulfilling relationships with other individuals can help people maintain emotional well-being, this model may be beneficial to people seeking therapy for any number of reasons, but in particular to address long-term emotional distress.

— Erica Merrill, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Wesley Chapel, FL
 

Our damage happened through relationships with other people, so it needs to be healed through our relationships with other people. Our earliest experiences starting in the womb shape our bodies and our brains and impact how we are able to interact with the world around us. It takes repeated positive interactions in order to heal the repeated negative interactions that so many experienced as infants and toddlers.

— Tia (Christia) Young, Counselor

Because I work relationally, it’s my goal that we develop a genuine relationship where we can safely have difficult conversations, have and resolve conflicts, and you feel comfortable experiencing vulnerability and a wide range of emotions from joy to pain. Therapy can create a reparative relational experience that brings you more self-understanding and helps you function with resilience and self-love in your interconnected world.

— Jennifer Alt, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
 

We as humans all have a desire and drive to form meaningful relationships and find acceptance. Relational Therapy is an approach that views relationships as central to psychological health and wellbeing and uses the therapeutic relationship to help facilitate awareness, growth, and positive change.

— Meaghan Decker, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Hudson, MA

I'm well trained in psychodynamic and systems-oriented relational therapy. This means that we'll work together to improve your relationships and overall wellbeing, through both exploring the past, and looking with curiosity at your current connections and patterns of communication. We'll be able to learn from the way you and I work and communicate together, trying new behaviors along the way. We'll discover what "old roles" worked in the past, that no longer serve you in the present.

— Joseph Hovey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY
 

Harm happens in relationship, and healing happens in relationship. We often carry our past relationships into our current ones, even if we're not aware of it at first. In psychotherapy, we will tend to the truth of the relationship, and together, welcome all it brings up for you. Healing happens not just in you telling stories, but in the ways we recognize how those stories impact each of us in the moment.

— Sarah Peace, Licensed Professional Counselor in Culver City, CA

My approach to relationship counseling comes from my training in Integrative Systemic Therapy, in which we analyze the positive feedback loops that occur between people and solidify unhealthy patterns of relating, and discover ways to change these sequences to become more responsive than reactive. I am trained in aspects of the Gottman Method, Emotionally Focused Therapy, Imago, and Attachment Theory.

— Grace Martin, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oak Park, IL
 

Relational psychotherapy, an approach that can help individuals recognize the role relationships play in the shaping of daily experiences, attempts to help people understand patterns appearing in the thoughts and feelings they have toward themselves. I look at how to bring balance back into your relational agreements, explore consent and how it shows up in your relationship (or not), how to help clarify communication, and look at attachment styles.

— Adrian Scharfetter, Sex Therapist in Santa Rosa, CA

I have focused on Relational-Cultural Therapy, which recognizes that relationships happen within a cultural context, and that context can be very important in understanding one's relationships. This form of therapy focuses on connection with others as a core human need, and works on modeling relational skills within the therapeutic relationship. I am happy to offer this form of therapy.

— Caera Gramore, Mental Health Practitioner in Arlington, WA