Integral Therapy

Integral therapy is a blended therapeutic approach that draws from several other methods and theories, including pharmacological, psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, existential, feminist, multicultural, somatic, and transpersonal. It was first developed by Ken Wilber and is founded on the idea that all insights on life contain partial truths and that weaving together a range of cultural, psychological, socioeconomic, biological, spiritual, and behavioral perspectives can often provide the best treatment. Integral therapy has much in common with holistic therapy and has a focus on increased mindfulness. It can be broadly applied to a number of issues, including trauma and relationship problems. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s integral therapy specialists today.

Meet the specialists

Integral therapy, similar to holistic therapy, is a therapeutic practice that takes an integrative approach and looks at the connections between a client’s mind, body and spirit. Like other types of mindfulness-based therapy, integral therapy is designed to help a client’s attention focus on the present moment and achieve clarity. Integral therapists use multiple approaches to addresses issues and encourage self-awareness and self-acceptance in clients.

— Jeremy Jones, Licensed Professional Counselor in Hillsboro, OR
 

My approach is unique to each person yet with a similar thread: that is, to ultimately help to unveil the wisdom that is already within you. I work with individuals, couples and groups within a framework of Transpersonal, Psychodynamic, Family Systems, Humanistic-Existential, Body-Oriented, and Expressive Art approaches to psychotherapy.

— Amelia Hall, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Integral psychotherapy proposes that all insights on life contain partial truths and that weaving together a range of cultural, psychological, socioeconomic, biological, spiritual, and behavioral perspectives can offer hope for healing, increased mindfulness, and social and cultural evolution. Integral approach draws from several theoretical orientations, leaning heavily on theories of transpersonal psychology. An integral approach embraces an attitude towards that affirms the inherent value of each individual. It is a unifying psychotherapy that responds appropriately and effectively to the person at the affective, behavioral, cognitive, and physiological levels of functioning, and addresses as well the spiritual dimension of life. Integral refers to the process of integrating the personality: taking disowned, unaware, or unresolved aspects of the self and making them part of a cohesive self. It is the process of making whole.

— Sarwang Parikh, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

“I heal in parts because systemic dis-ease took me apart.” - Dr. Jennifer Mulan, Decolonizing Therapy, author, therapist, community organizer My belief in the therapeutic process is that it is a tool in helping to integrate various pieces of our experience that have been forced to dissociate due to stress, trauma & systemic oppressions. We’ll pace our work at your rhythm in order to process various feelings and experiences, intentionally connecting & integrating them into your whole being.

— Jonathan Julian, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

Integral Psychotherapy involves the application of Ken Wilber’s AQAL model in the world of psychotherapy. The result is a meta-orientation – a way to connect the central ideas and interventions of the world’s major approaches to psychotherapy. The goal of Integral Psychotherapy is to help us move beyond the limits of postmodern thinking into a truly comprehensive, holistic understanding of mental health and well-being.

— Todd Schmenk, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Providence, RI

This style of Freud's "talking cure" is more than words. We explore places in your body that have messages for you, like a constant tension in your chest, or stomach pangs when you think of someone. Perhaps your heart-strings are attached to people in ways that deserve attention and reconsideration. We also look at those thoughts that keep circling, those patterns of cognition that trip you up, and even those deep, core beliefs that may no longer be true. Bringing soul into therapy is a way of connecting with the larger human experience, seeing ourselves as unique while sharing in the collective. Spirit is the lens that shows us there is more to the world than meets the eye. Here we examine questions of meaning and purpose.

— Matthew Breuer, Counselor in San Francisco, CA