Sensorimotor Psychotherapy

Developed by Pat Ogden, sensorimotor psychotherapy is a body-centered therapeutic approach to treating the somatic (or physical) symptoms of trauma. In combination with techniques from cognitive, affective and psychodynamic treatment theories, Sensorimotor Psychotherapy focuses on the client’s bodily experiences as a way to achieve increased awareness and well-being. Therapists practicing Sensorimotor Psychotherapy will help clients to become aware of their bodies and track their bodily sensations. They will teach clients how to implement physical actions that promote empowerment and competency. Sensorimotor Psychotherapy may be particularly helpful for clients are working through trauma as well as those with anxiety, depression, anger management issues, and addictions. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s Sensorimotor Psychotherapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

I am Level 1 trained in Sensorimotor Psychotherapy and integrate this into my Person-Centered, Strengths-Based approach to all my treatment. I believe there is a strong connection between the mind and body and that sometimes mental health issues can store themselves in the physical body.

— Misty Gibson, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Tacoma, WA
 

SP is a holistic approach integrating somatic, emotional, cognitive, and relational aspects to help clients heal from trauma and attachment experiences. As an SP-informed therapist I use a mindful, experiential approach to guide my clients in processing their experiences. SP is nonviolent, always following the wisdom of the client and never forcing change before someone is ready. SP honors behavior patterns as adaptive and protective for us. I am Level I trained and completing Level II.

— Laura Stephan, Psychologist

I am level-one trained in Sensorimotor Psychotherapy. I also have additional somatic trainings, including yoga, Movement for Trauma (with Jane Clapp), and others.

— Raina LaGrand, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

I have completed Level I and Level II Sensorimotor Psychotherapy trainings in order to work holistically with trauma and attachment wounds on all the levels in which they are stored in the body, including emotions, cognitions, sensations, movement, and impulse.

— Nicole Versaw, Clinical Social Worker in Greenwood Village, CO

Sensorimotor Psychotherapy combines talk therapy and mindful attention to the body, familiarizing us with the ways we show up in the world and in relationship. All of us have adapted brilliantly, based on our early experiences, but sometimes those adaptations can create issues for us as we move outside our family systems. By studying the connection between our body and mind, we can experiment with new ways of being in and finding resources in our bodies that lead to more fulfilling way of being.

— Jennie Bertone, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

Sensorimotor Psychotherapy is a somatic (body-based) therapy for trauma and stress. This therapy uses mindful awareness of your senses and body movement to reconnect with and strengthen your capacity to feel good, and to process through responses that get "stuck" in our systems when we have an overwhelming or traumatic experience. Sensorimotor Psychotherapy allows you to process trauma without having to "tell the story" of the experience.

— Fievel Jack Steller, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

Sensorimotor Psychotherapy uses mindful attention to the body to familiarize us with the ways we show up in the world and in relationship. All of us have adapted brilliantly, based on our early experiences. However, sometimes those adaptations can create issues for us as we move outside our family systems. By studying the connection between our body and mind, we can experiment with new ways of being in and finding resources in our bodies that lead to more fulfilling way of being.

— Jennie Bertone, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

I am currently in the process of training for this amazing modality. The somatic focus builds on my yoga and mindfulness trainings in powerful ways. Sensorimotor psychotherapy is an especially powerful tool for people who recovering from PTSD and CPTSD.

— Jennifer Given-Helms, Counselor in Bellingham, WA

Talk therapy is most effective when integrated through the body. If you are willing, I will work with you to explore movement and sound. I have practiced Continuum Movement since 1988 and have experience with Buteyko breath work. My training in Sensorimotor Psychotherapy, Level I & II, plus assisting at trainings, gives me a foundation to work with trauma.

— Julene Weaver, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

I have completed level 1 and 2 of Sensorimotor psychotherapy as well as advanced trauma training. Sensorimotor is a body oriented approach to trauma and attachment issues which builds mindful curiosity about the patterns we develop in our life from a mind-body approach.

— Nathalie Edmond, Clinical Psychologist in Ewing, NJ

I am nearly done with level II of sensorimotor psychotherapy. When I'm done, it will be a total of 270 hours of training. My trainer asked me to help her teach level I next fall, which should help me understand this approach even more. I love how SP helps us process trauma where it's stored--in the body. You are probably aware of your physical symptoms. SP can help us address those compassionately and directly.

— Rachel Slough-Johnson, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Winona, MN
 

Utilizing sensorimotor psychotherapy with both individuals and couples has offered my clients a chance to deepen into their work with me. By understanding the mind-body connection, and engaging with the felt experience in the body, clients can often move through traumatic experience in meaningful and helpful ways, while also avoiding feeling retraumatized.

— Lisa Katona, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

Sensorimotor Psychotherapy--those are some big words. I think of it more as a way to integrate attachment work, mindfulness, parts work as well as somatic work to understand your body, and help unlock the information it holds. It's not necessarily as simple as that sounds, but working in this way has really helped my clients gain so much more understanding about themselves and how they can begin to take steps to feel more present in their own lives.

— Sherry Alamdari, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in SANTA MONICA, CA