Depth Therapy

Depth therapy, or depth psychology, refers to therapeutic approaches that take the unconscious into account. It is an interdisciplinary approach and therapists that practice depth therapy believe that everyone has traits they may not be aware of that influence their emotions, decisions, work, and life. The unconscious influence that these traits have may be negative, and depth therapy helps individuals better recognize these subconscious forces at work, so that they might better understand their present situation. A therapist specializing in depth therapy will work to help you gain more self-awareness in order to further develop positive traits and cope with the negatives. Think this approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s depth therapy experts today!

Meet the specialists

I have a Masters Degree in Depth Psychology and am pursuing my PhD in Depth Psychology. Depth Psychology views the human experience to be rooted in the deep unconscious and by addressing our wounds through bringing unconscious material into consciousness and integrating it into our current experience facilitates personal growth, healing, and development. We use techniques such as active imagination, dreamwork, and expressive arts to create a relationship with the personal unconscious.

— Augustino-Chloe Tierramar, Counselor in Boulder, CO
 

Depth psychotherapy is a dynamic exploration of your life. Taken with a trusted and skilled guide, this collaborative journey can bring long-lasting relief from suffering and freedom from deeply engrained, self-defeating and unconscious patterns that keep you from being your self in the world and from living a more fulfilling life.

— David Brown, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

Depth psychotherapy is a way of saying that the unconscious is important. In this type of work, we are not just looking to problem solve, although that may be part of the process. Instead, we are looking at underlying patterns, motivations, and origins. We may work with dreams, sand tray, imagery, expressive art, or body posture and sensation to explore what's really going on underneath the presenting story. This kind of work can be deeply healing and restorative as we give the soul a chance to express itself and be heard.

— Jennifer Wohl, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

Psychodynamic and attachment theory are the foundation of my training. While we will not spend every session discussing your family of origin, we will hold this early blueprint and the ways that this shaped you while exploring the impact on your current experience. I incorporate the wisdom traditions and dreamwork to support an understanding of the unconscious.

— Ali Psiuk, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA
 

Having worked extensively with people who have experienced traumas in their early life stages and complex psyches, I have practiced depth therapy to support the people I work with to experience relief and to blossom.

— Ruchika Mehta, Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

Therapy is a space for you to explore more about your inner and outer life. By exploring with a non-judgmental presence in the room, you are able to see your experience with new context and from new perspectives. By expanding your view of your life, you can see new possibilities, lay old hurts to rest, and envision your future for yourself.

— Connor Moss, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

Depth therapy approaches can draw on psychodynamic and humanistic approaches. I aim to assist adults and couples to build insight and work towards individuation through a strong therapeutic alliance.

— Brian Benjamin, Clinical Psychologist in Pasadena, CA
 

Depth therapy utilizes symbols and metaphors to assist clients in understanding their unconscious urges and beliefs. By bringing into consciousness, what drives us, we can better understand who we are. This can lead us to integrate all aspects of ourself so that we can become more authentic and reach our full potential.

— Allison Batty-Capps, Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR

I do medium to long term therapy with my clients, working beyond easy or behavioral fixes.

— Kerry Cohen, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I am a mature therapist, having begun my practice after decades of integrating the natural world and the arts into education and other transformational work. Training under the close supervision of an experienced depth psychotherapist, I have considerable experience with work that is grounded in explorations of both our darkness and our light, where the depth of who we are and all we have experienced can be held and acknowledged so that it may be transformed.

— Amy Benedict, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in New Paltz, NY

I believe that we need to process stories from the past that repeat themselves in the present. This involves looking at themes, patterns, feelings, internal processes that might be buried or glossed over in daily life. By tapping into these feelings, we are able to do the hard work of having integrity internally while dealing externally in different environments.

— Marc Anderson, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

I attended Pacifica Graduate Institute, a renowned school for Depth Psychology. My practice focuses on attending to your underlying core beliefs that are keeping you stuck in painful patterns.

— Grace Porter, Counselor
 

Depth Psychology is one modality that is used to mine unconscious material that may be trying to come to our awareness. I use dreamwork as one way to work with the unconscious and other meditative techniques to drill down to find causes of the symptoms you may be dealing with daily. Identifying the root of the problem and creating an individualized plan is key in helping you find true life harmony.

— Kristen Griego, Counselor in Westminster, CO

Depth psychotherapy describes a range of approaches to therapy that take the unconscious into account, rather than one specific modality. This interdisciplinary approach to treatment is based on the idea that all people possess traits or elements of nature that may influence, often unconsciously, their natural processes. These approaches combine elements of psychoanalysis and Jungian psychology, with transpersonal psychology and existentialism among the other notable influences.

— Alex Tsai, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in SAN CARLOS, CA

Depth Therapy involves exploring deeply rooted, often unconscious negative beliefs that can limit and hurt us. Those beliefs are formed in early childhood, but they affect us at any age unless we explore and understand them. Depth therapy is a long-term process because it allows people resolve their difficulties once and for all by healing old traumas and learning healthy coping skills. I use depth approach to bring love and compassion into your relationship with yourself and others.

— Tatiana Morris, Licensed Professional Counselor in Minneapolis, MN
 

So much of who we are lies under the surface of our thoughts. Our psyche speaks to us in dreams, emotion, bodily symptoms, and images. Depth therapy takes us on a journey to our inner world where we can reconnect with creativity, inspiration, and forgotten aspects of our self.

— Devona Snook, Counselor in San Francisco, CA
 

Jungian and depth psychotherapy are the approaches that made me feel at home with psychotherapy, and one of the biggest ways that I personally approach my own integrated wellness. Considering the deeper processes of the psyche, at work in dreams, art, stories, and imagery, is a process that often underlies the situations and struggles we experience on the surface. Not all clients are looking for deeper explorations, but for those who are, I am willing to dive the depths with you.

— Rae Blaisdell, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Colorado Springs, CO

I fell in love with Depth therapy during my Masters program and received training in it for over a year. Depth therapy refers to accessing parts of ourselves that may be deep within us, or in the subconscious. In my practice, I aim to help people become aware of those parts of themselves and to work through those emotions and experiences. The result is becoming a more whole and integrated human being, one who can bring to light their hidden parts, soothe them and gain awareness.

— SkyeBlu Cutchie, Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

There are times in our lives when we reach a spiritual crisis. It may be as a result of a loss. Someone in the church may betray us. We may remember our past abuse. These crises in faith may rob us of our spiritual foundation. We may become alienated from our former beliefs. I believe that we are not just a brain in a body. We are all spiritual as well as physical being. Relating to our depths can make all the difference.

— Daniel Davis, Counselor in Santa Clara, CA

Depth Therapy involves exploring deeply rooted, often unconscious negative beliefs that can limit and hurt us. Those beliefs are formed in early childhood, but they affect us at any age unless we explore and understand them. Depth therapy is a long-term process because it takes time to build trust in therapeutic relationship.

— Tatiana Morris, Licensed Professional Counselor in Minneapolis, MN
 

I have a Masters Degree in Depth Psychology and am pursuing my PhD in Depth Psychology. Depth Psychology views the human experience to be rooted in the deep unconscious and by addressing our wounds through bringing unconscious material into consciousness and integrating it into our current experience facilitates personal growth, healing, and development. We use techniques such as active imagination, dreamwork, and expressive arts to create a relationship with the personal unconscious.

— Augustino-Chloe Tierramar, Counselor in Boulder, CO
 

Much of my personal work has been deeply existential and transformative in a way I did not know possible for much of my life. I recognize that both the conscious and unconscious play crucial roles in how we exist within the world, and it is a unique path for each individual to awaken to the unconscious within themselves. This can include exploration of the feminine and masculine archetypes, the patriarchy of our culture today, the shadow self, and other Jungian concepts.

— Emma Shearer, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Atlanta, GA