Cultural and Systemic Oppression

The term cultural and systemic oppression refers to the mistreatment of people of a specific group that is supported and enforced by society and its institutions. It can be formal or implicit, and appears in many forms, including racism and sexism. Oppression of any kind, especially over an extended period of time, can deeply affect your mental health and your sense of self. Working with a therapist who is well-versed in these constructs can help you better recognize when they are influencing your life, and how to better manage that influence. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s cultural and systemic oppression specialists today.

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Facing daily sociocultural pressures can be incredibly painful. Regardless of what brought them to therapy, many of my patients have a social identity that has impacted their mental health in some way. My goal is to help you harness resources, both in your environment and within yourself, that can help you navigate persistent and oppressive social forces. No matter how you identify, my door is always open.

— Saira Malhotra, Therapist in Denver, CO

Did you know that research indicates that microaggressions have the same effect on our systems as a Big T Trauma? If you live with cultural and systemic oppression, its effects on your wellbeing and health cannot be understated. If you live in a world where your experiences are minimized and silenced, it's especially important to seek spaces where you can fully exist and express what it's like to be you. And therapy can be one of those safe spaces where you can take up space without apology.

— Ji Eun Ko, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA
 

I practice liberation counseling from an anti-oppressive lens and focus on how oppression impacts relationships, health (physical, mental, spiritual), work, and all other life domains.

— Cathy Harrington, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Everett, WA

All of us are brilliant students of our society, — our families, communities, societies, culture. These factors shape our identities based on creed, gender, colour, etc. — which then shape our realities. To know who we are requires understanding these influences, which reflect this imperfect world as well as how it has shaped who we are. By doing so, we can tease out who we are at our “core,” from what we’ve been taught. I look forward to shifting through these layers with you to find your true

— I-Ching Grace Hung, Psychologist in San Francisco, CA
 

We examine racism and its impacts on mental health and provide positive psychology techniques o manage the impacts of racism on one's life.

— Ebony Davis, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Supervisor

I practice using a liberation framework where I understand that traditional, Western psychology practice are often not sufficient in addressing the mental health concerns of the historically oppressed.

— Taryn Hodison, Licensed Professional Counselor in Kansas City, MO
 

Living in this world can take a toll on your sense of self, your self love, and your self-esteem. In our work together, I seek to understand the forms of oppression that have impacted you most so that we can start to unlearn the harmful systemic messaging that has taken away some of your sense of self-wonder and (re)introduce you to your own majesty.

— Sam Krehel, Mental Health Counselor in , WA

In my personal life, I have experienced cultural/systemic oppression. I know all too well the impacts it can have on someone's mental health and relationships. I utilize a cultural framework to highlight how oppression impacts the problem and how to cope with the effects.

— Diamond Rodgers, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Las Vegas, NV
 

Research shows that the impacts of discrimination and marginalization can manifest in both mental and physical health. I strive to take into account factors related to culture, context, privilege and marginalization, as we explore therapeutic concerns.

— Dr. Luana Bessa, Psychologist in Boston, MA
 

Social structures, policies, and institutions that serve to oppress people of color has a severe impact on mental health. Systemic racism not only puts marganalized groups at a socioeconomic disadvantage, but it also takes a toll on their mental health. Systemic racism puts marginalized groups at an economcial disadvantage; and the social structures, policies, and institutions that serve to oppress people of color both taking extreme toll on their mental health.

— Roman Haas, Counselor in , CO

The historical system of oppression (white supremacy) that our society operates under impacts all of us regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, ability, body size, etc. Our seek therapists seek to understand dynamics of power, privilege, and oppression that have shaped our clients identities and lived experiences & work towards helping you heal the wounds from racial stress and racial trauma (microaggressions, racism, violence, & discrimination).

— Aguirre Center for Inclusive Psychotherapy, Psychologist in Atlanta, GA
 

Being Hispanic myself, I want to make a big change in what the system tells us as minorities. Most have been lies!! I also want to help with Transgenerational PTSD. Trauma is like ghost that haunt our families for generations . Until we heal from those traumas!! Then they can become ancestors and spread wisdom to future generation. Let me help you make ancestors that spread wisdom!

— Jose Feliciano, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in La MESA, CA

Clinically, I work from a holistic, relational, empowerment focused and intersectional feminist perspective. I recognize that areas of oppression are linked and cumulative. In response, I work to help clients navigate these complex dynamics and improve their quality of life. As a cis-white, able-bodied female, it is my job to do the background work and create a space where clients can explore, learn and understand themselves better. You are the expert of your life.

— Olivia Carollo, Clinical Psychologist in Chicago, IL
 

Facing daily sociocultural pressures can be incredibly painful. Regardless of what brought them to therapy, many of my patients have a social identity that has impacted their mental health in some way. My goal is to help you harness resources, both in your environment and within yourself, that can help you navigate persistent and oppressive social forces. No matter how you identify, my door is always open.

— Saira Malhotra, Therapist in Denver, CO

I have worked in and adjacent to the activist community in Chicago and am familiar with the was that systemic oppression impacts cultures of the global majority. I work to affirm my clients, help to repair their racial stress/traumatic memories and organize their strategies for managing the structural oppression they have and may continue to face and experience.

— Shelly Quiles, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Chicago, IL
 

Systemic oppression can be damaging to your life, mental health and impact your sense of self. As a Black therapist, I understand the damage that this can cause and I also understand that there are times when western psychology practice is not always sufficient in addressing the mental health concerns of the historically oppressed and marginalized.

— Chioko Grevious, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Sacramento, CA