EMDR

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) relies on a client's own rapid, rhythmic eye movements, and is founded on the belief that these eye movements can weaken the intensity of emotionally charged memories. EMDR is most often used to treat PTSD or other traumas, but is also sometimes used for panic attacks, eating disorders, addictions, and anxiety. EMDR sessions can last up to 90 minutes, and usually starts with a client rating their level of distress. A therapist then typically moves their fingers in front of your face (or sometimes toe tapping or musical tones), asking you to follow along with your eyes, while you recall a traumatic event and all the sensations that come with it. You will gradually be guided by the therapist to shift thoughts from the traumatic experience to a more comforting one. The goal of EMDR is to make disturbing memories less immobilizing. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s EMDR specialists today.

Meet the specialists

I love all aspects of EMDR and find the outcomes superior to other trauma modalities. In addition, I use the Flash Technique when needed to bring a disturbance down to a manageable level so that we can process using the full protocol thereafter.

— Niki Saigeon, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Colorado Springs, CO
 

I am EMDR certified and have had a number of additional training's in EMDR for addiction and EMDR for attachment to round out my expertise.

— Valerie Kreger, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Wichita, KS
 

EMDR stands for Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy. It is a body mind integrated therapy that has been proven to be highly effective for those who have experienced trauma. I practice somatic an attachment focused EMDR, which allows the client to process distressing memories with less resistance.

— Paula Kirsch, Clinical Social Worker in Detroit, MI
 

Have completed training through the EMDR institute, Inc. and am in training for Attachment-focused EMDR therapy. I apply all appropriate stages of EMDR based on clients’ unique needs.

— Jaclin Belabri, Counselor in Vancouver, WA

I offer EMDR to clients who may need help getting past traumatic events or feel ‘stuck’ in therapy or their ways of coping. EMDR is a scientifically-proven type of psychotherapy that is targeted to help people heal from emotional distress, trauma, and other difficult life events. It’s been shown to help with a variety of issues, including anxiety, depression, PTSD, addiction, panic attacks etc. EMDR is based on the belief that the mind is geared towards healing when certain ‘blocks’ in processing are removed. Therapists who provide this modality are required to undergo extensive training and credentialing.

— Arianna Smith, Licensed Professional Counselor in Littleton, CO

EMDR is an amazing form of therapy which helps people resolve trauma, anxiety, and negative beliefs they hold about themselves. Often times people are able to reach their therapeutic goals more quickly when EMDR is a part of the therapeutic process.

— Steffanie Stecker, Counselor in Englewood, CO
 

Your brain has an amazing ability to heal itself, but sometimes things overwhelm it’s natural healing ability and you get stuck. Stuck in a past memory, flooded by emotions of something long ago, wanting to just block it out but it breaks through again and again. Let me help you recover. If the memory is too overwhelming we can break it into small pieces and work on a little at a time. If even that sounds like too much, I can use a technique that causes your brain to subconsciously heal while yo

— Tammy Cover, Counselor in Magnolia, TX
 

EMDR is an evidenced-based therapy that uses your own natural ability to heal! It is effective for a number of concerns and can produce quick and long-lasting results. I'm nationally certified in EMDR and my specialties include helping clients of all ages heal from childhood sexual abuse and neglect, assault, bad relationships, PTSD, dissociation, attachment issues, and trauma based on cultural identities and discrimination.

— Kaley Sinclair Jiawon, Counselor in Orlando, FL

I am an EMDR Therapist, trained to help those experiencing trauma. EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) is a psychological approach developed by Francine Shapiro to help people heal from trauma or adversities such as issues of abuse, bullying, domestic violence, grief/loss, attachment wounds, abandonment, PTSD, and many other complicated life issues. EMDR Therapy is now validated as an evidence-based approach.

— Patty Cowan, Psychologist in Lawrence, KS
 

I am trained in EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing), which is an evidence based treatment for PTSD as well as several other concerns (e.g., developmental/attachment trauma, phobias, addiction, anxiety). I will be completing advanced training in Attachment-Focused EMDR in 2019.

— Carly Henderson, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

A specialized approach utilizing specific memories we have attached negative beliefs about ourselves, Meredith will walk you through this short term structured therapy to help alleviate the current suffering from these old beliefs.

— Meredith Riddick, Counselor in Ashburn, VA
 

Unprocessed traumatic experiences often are held in the nervous system and reinforce negative beliefs about the self. EMDR has the potential to reprocess these difficult memories and work to shift harmful beliefs. I am EMDR trained, and have had powerful results treating adults with childhood trauma through EMDR. I believe this model in combination with art therapy and transpersonal counseling can provide a very effective multimodal approach to treating trauma.

— Sarah Klein, Licensed Professional Counselor in Fort Collins, CO

For most people, discussing the trauma is uncomfortable and at times re victimizing. EMDR approaches the treatment with visualization paired with modern neuroscience. There is very little discussion, if any. Result are often immediate and people report their flashbacks and anxiety in general fading fast. I was the recipient of this approach as I worked through my own traumas. From those successes, I gained certification as a practitioner of this approach.

— Jason Walter, Licensed Professional Counselor in Lake Elmo, MN

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is an extensively researched integrative psychotherapy approach that has proven consistently effective in the rapid treatment of trauma, PTSD, and many other presenting issues. Did you realize it could also help you learn to reduce stress, cope with grief and loss, improve your self-esteem, phobias like health/performance/social anxiety, reduce negative self-talk, and move beyond "stuck" points? I've had extensive training in EMDR and can help

— JaLeah Law, Clinical Psychologist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is the gold standard in trauma treatment. It is also extremely helpful for anxiety, intrusive thoughts/memories, and mind/body work.

— Kimberly Fann, Mental Health Counselor in Oviedo, FL

Eye Movement De-sensitization and Reprocessing (what a mouthful!) Basically the training is extensive (I have completed it all) and take every class I can to increase my knowledge. If you feel “stuck” or still bothered by a trauma, no matter how big or small, it is an unprocessed trauma and EMDR is for you. This process un-sticks trauma and removes your bothersome symptoms.

— Laura (Lori) Patin, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Eagle River, AK
 

I completed training and consultation in EMDR to address the pain and suffering that lingers with trauma, grief, anxiety, pain, and depression. EMDR is a powerful whole brain technique to help you move forward by updating memories and emotions and moving trauma out of your body.

— Lisa Hedden, Counselor in Tucker, GA

EMDR is my favorite modality, it's like magic I swear. Okay, it's not really magic, but it feels that way when you are doing it. It feels silly, but the "bi-lateral" stimulation (which can be feeling a buzz in alternating hands, tapping on alternating knees, or shifting your eyes back and forth as you follow my fingers) while working through past trauma and it reduces the emotional component attached to memories. It's even been approved by the VA for treatment of PTSD and they're tough.

— Taunya Gesner, Counselor in Gresham, OR
 

EMDR (eye movement desensitization and reprocessing) is an evidence-based treatment for trauma, overwhelming experiences, and anything that feels disturbing or distressing. It is an experiential method in which difficult memories are recalled while the therapist guides the client to focus on eye movements, left-right tapping, or other forms of "bilateral" (two-sided) stimulation. When EMDR is successful, distressing memories lose their charge and become part of the narrative of one's life, rather than a source of present distress. I have been trained in EMDR at levels I and II and have been practicing this modality since 2009.

— Jennifer Wohl, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

I am fully trained in EMDR and working towards EMDRIA certification. I did my training with Dr. Phil Manfield through JFK University in 2018.

— Laurel Roberts-Meese, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is a fairly new, nontraditional type of psychotherapy. EMDR is a psychotherapy that enables people to heal from the symptoms and emotional distress that are the result of disturbing life experiences. This technique has been very successful in helping people who suffer from trauma, anxiety, panic, disturbing memories, post traumatic stress and many other emotional problems.

— Livewell Behavioral Health, Marriage & Family Therapist in Fresno, CA
 

If you're skeptical about therapy, read on. You may want to try EMDR before you give up. I believe in talk therapy. But I also believe that an hour of EMDR is typically the equivalent of months of traditional therapy. It's different. Its also safe, swift, and very effective. It builds on any therapy you've already had so we won't need to reinvent the wheel. We begin with covering simple micro skills so you can start EMDR with confidence and a framework for understanding your EMDR experiences. After as few as 1 or 2 sessions, most people begin to find that their problems are no longer so hurtful. I've applied EMDR to most conditions. This includes trauma, but also developing positive strengths and mindfulness. It really helps with grief, anxiety, phobias, depression, bipolar disorders, ADHD, creative blocks, codependence, couples' conflict, and anger, sleep, pain, chronic illness, and stress and cravings management.

— Valerie Keim, Counselor in Pleasant Hill, CA
 

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing is pretty much a misnomer nowadays; few people do anything with the eyes. The tool is Bilateral Stimulation. The process is complex and simple both. It is scientific as hell and deeply spiritual. It is the most rapid way of resolving the most complex of traumatic wounds. It is a powerful tool and knowing when it's time to use it is very, very important.

— Eli Hastings, Marriage & Family Therapist in Seattle, WA

I have completed the EMDRIA approved EMDR training through the Parnell Institute. This is an attachment focused EMDR and is really valuable in the treatment of trauma, anxiety, and generally places where we may find ourselves "stuck" in the work together. EMDR is something that gets integrated into the other modalities I use with individuals.

— Heather Bradley, Psychologist in San Francisco, CA
 

EMDR therapy is a way to overcome the impact of traumatic events. EMDR helps your brain reprocess what happened in the safety of the present, with me and when you are ready, without ever having to talk in detail about what happened. When the treatment is done, you will not forget what happened, but you will be able to remember it, when needed, without intrusive symptoms that you may be noticing now, like nightmares, anxiety, and avoidance.

— Dana Frederick, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Marietta, GA

EMDR, when done effectively, can be a profound remedy for shock trauma often resulting in PTSD. Preparedness for this includes the development of a contemplative practice, in order to allow the mind to truly roam the matrix of meaning, and the embodiment of the client. My skill in both these areas, honed in supervision groups and advanced trainings, including those with Dr. Shapiro, allow my clients to experience considerable benefit.

— Inga Larson, Counselor in Denver, CO
 

I am trained in EMDR therapy and mix it with creative and verbal therapy in sessions.

— Krista Verrastro, Creative Art Therapist in Reisterstown, MD

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is an evidence based treatment for trauma. Many of the symptoms related to stress, anxiety, and depression that lead individuals to seek therapy are due to developmental, physical or emotional trauma. Even if you have been fortunate enough to avoid suffering any big traumatic events, everyone has had an experience of overwhelm, and trauma is simply an experience of overwhelm that is beyond ones capacity to adapt effectively. EMDR uses bilateral stimulation (side to side eye movement, tapping, vibration and/or sound), which has proven effective in reducing the charge of painful memories and triggering events. EMDR enhances the flow of information between the Brainstem, Limbic Regions and Neocortex, and supports integration between the left and right hemispheres. My goal as an EMDR and Somatic Psychotherapist is to provide you with tools and experiences to create a more integrated life of internal and interpersonal health and wellbeing.

— Erika Shershun, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

EMDR is a hot topic right now because it is AMAZING in helping the brain work through trauma. The therapist assists you in finding the targets you want to work through and then uses bilateral stimulation with either sound, pulses, or visual stimuli. The theory is that these things assist the brain in working through the fragmented memories that couldn't be properly placed while under stress. It is very useful for those who are not able or willing to process through traditional talk therapy.

— Catherine McConnell, Counselor in Arlington, TX

I am EMDR Trained to help you re-process past experiences that are likely causing you discomfort. With EMDR, you can experience enhanced coping with chronic health issues. You'll finally have a chance to breathe when previously you've been stuck. Bilateral processing helps you develop a deeper connection to safety as well as a way for stuck emotions and experiences to finally become free.

— Patrick Tully, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

When something bad happens in your childhood, it can get stuck in the brain. You may even notice when you think about it you can see, smell, and hear the event just like it was happening right now. EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) helps transform the memory into something that does not cause distress in your current life. You will still remember the event, yet it won't feel like it's happening right now, and you won't feel the body sensations (increased heart rate, sweaty palms, fast breathing) you may have experienced previously. I am trained in Level I and II EMDR, and I am pleased to provide this service to my clients.

— Rachel Moore, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA

EMDR, or eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, is a powerful, evidence-based therapeutic tool that has been proven effective for relieving symptoms of trauma as well as other mental health issues. Unlike traditional “talk-therapy”, AF-EMDR therapy (Attachment-Focused EMDR) focuses on the client’s processing that takes place in the subconscious brain, and less about communicating in the prefrontal cortex, or conscious brain. Often, rationalization and denial get in the way, keeping clients stuck when change and healing want to occur. AF-EMDR bypasses these roadblocks, allowing access to the root cause that is keeping the client stuck and a felt sense of change and healing to emerge.

— Kevin Stolper, Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

As of Feb 2018 I will be certified in EMDR to help those with past traumas and for whom traditional talk therapy is not sufficient. EMDR addresses trauma by helping the brain reprocess by using bilateral stimulation, and is a proven and effective trauma treatment.

— Linnea Logas, Counselor in Minneapolis, MN
 

Since being trained in EMDR I have seen clients gain freedom from unwanted emotional and physiological responses. I heard someone describe EMDR this way, “I have all these files in my brain and I don’t know where to slot my traumas so they effect every file. After EMDR they have their own file and I can access them when I want to or just let them stay in the file. My trauma no longer defines me.”

— Aimee Grimm, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Montrose, CA

EMDR is becoming widely used to treat trauma. This method helps the body reveal what has long since been hidden from our consciousness related to past trauma or painful events. This can keep us feeling stuck, anxious & depressed in a every day. Chronic overwhelming feelings often indicate the body is working hard to manage outward stress/experiences while managing inward fears from the past. It is possible to feel more safe & at ease in your body as well as move forward in your life.

— Kathleen Thompson, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I am an EMDRIA Approved EMDR Therapist. EMDR is a healing journey. With EMDR, we search out the unresolved memories tied to your current symptoms or discomfort. Then one by one, we revisit them and have another chance to understand them, and resolve them in a prepared non overwhelming way.

— William Portis, Licensed Professional Counselor in Bloomington, IL

I am an EMDRIA Approved EMDR Therapist. EMDR is a healing journey. With EMDR, we search out the unresolved memories tied to your current symptoms or discomfort. Then one by one, we revisit them and have another chance to understand them, and resolve them in a prepared non overwhelming way.

— William Portis, Licensed Professional Counselor in Bloomington, IL
 

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a specialized treatment which requires extensive education, training, and supervision in order to be able to practice. It's a way to unlock trauma and help particular memories to not be so painful. Together we can discuss if this would be beneficial for you.

— Erin Grasmeyer, Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Alamitos, CA

EMDR has been found to effectively treat mood and anxiety disorders, including depression, phobias, and panic disorder. It is also a fabulous therapy for PTSD and traumas in general.

— Henry Grayson, Psychologist in New York, NY
 

I have been providing EMDR to clients for over 2 years. I am trained to provide EMDR to clients with both PTSD as well as recent event traumas where PTSD has not yet been diagnosed.

— Liz Imparato, Licensed Professional Counselor in Phoenix, AZ
 

I have completed the Level 1 and Level 2 trainings for EMDR. I am currently pursuing my EMDR certification through EMDRIA. This is a unique and proven therapy that has traditionally been used to treat trauma, but can also be helpful in many other disorders including chronic pain, anxiety, depression and addictions. Please visit emdria.org for further information.

— Julie Bivins, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Henrico, VA

I am EMDR trained and in the process of becoming EMDR certified. I am training with Dr. Christie Sprowls, one of the most renowned and respected EMDR practitioners and trainers worldwide.

— SALLY RUMSEY, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX
 

I have completed the two weekends of EMDR Basic Training and I have experience using the EMDR protocol with adults. I receive consultation for my work with EMDR from an EMDRIA-approved consultant.

— Lauren Krzyzaniak, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Oregon City, OR

Certified EMDRIA therapist (trained in 2001) and EMDRIA Approved Consultant-in-Training (to supervise other therapists training in EMDR)

— Robyn Brickel, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Alexandria, VA

Completed EMDRIA approved training through EMDR Institute and Parnell Institute. Specializing in treating PTSD and attachment.

— Erica Thompson, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA
 

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, or EMDR, is a powerful new psychotherapy technique which has been very successful in helping people who suffer from trauma, anxiety, panic, disturbing memories, post traumatic stress and many other emotional problems. Until recently, these conditions were difficult and time-consuming to treat. EMDR is considered a breakthrough therapy because of its simplicity and the fact that it can bring quick and lasting relief for most types of emotional distress. EMDR is the most effective and rapid method for healing PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) as shown by extensive scientific research studies. The EMDR therapy uses bilateral stimulation, right/left eye movement, or tactile stimulation, which repeatly activates the opposite sides of the brain, releasing emotional experiences that are "trapped" in the nervous system. This assists the neurophysiological system, the basis of the mind/body connection, to free itself of blockages and reconnect itself.

— Kimberly Krueger MSW, LCSW, Counselor in Davidson, NC
 

Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing therapy helps you process past disturbing issues and find relief.

— Gerda Phillips, Counselor in Phoenix, AZ

I'm a certified EMDR Practitioner.

— Lili Wagner, Psychologist in Newhall, CA
 

EMDR is a bodymind process of moving what is stuck in the brain into normal adaptive functioning. For appropriate clients, it can work faster than talk therapy and work at a deeper level. This paves the way for other therapies like CBT to work with less resistance.

— SHANE HENNESEY, Counselor in Richmond, TX

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a therapy more and more people are requesting. I took my training through an EMDRIA (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing International Association) which is the governing board to ensure clinicians are doing the therapy correctly and staying true to following the structure in which it was created for. EMDR can help folks with a variety of struggles such as PTSD, Acute Stress Disorder, anxiety, specific phobias, urges, eating disorders and addictions. I personally have used EMDR and that is what encouraged me to seek training to help my clients seek relief that is typically quicker than traditional talk therapy. Before we get into EMDR, I like to educate my clients on the process and what sessions will look like moving forward.

— Erica Faulhaber, Licensed Professional Counselor in Lakewood, CO
 

I am trained to Level II in EMDR by Francine Shapiro and have practiced this therapy for many years. I use EMDR extensively to treat a wide variety of traumas, and I also use approved therapeutic offshoots of EMDR to address compulsive behaviors, dissociated parts of oneself, and other special issues. I am careful to enhance your strengths and sense of safety, and work with you on the issues that you would like to resolve.

— Melissa Owens, Counselor in Portland, OR

Negative life events can have a lasting impact, as our brains are not able to process them in a helpful way. This can have a direct impact on how we experience the world around us. EMDR therapy uses bilateral stimulation (side-to-side motion) which mimics what is naturally happening during REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. The result of EMDR therapy is being able to process negative life experiences in a helpful way.

— Mallory Lyons, Counselor in Redmond, WA
 

I became interested and trained in EMDR due to its effectiveness at clearing residual stress from certain memories/experiences. I use EMDR in combination with grounding and mindfulness techniques to help my clients overcome their experiences and build resiliency.

— Katherine Hughes, Clinical Social Worker in Alexandria, VA
 

Since being trained in EMDR I have seen clients gain freedom from unwanted emotional and physiological responses. I heard someone describe EMDR this way, “I have all these files in my brain; the spouse file, friend file, career file. I don’t know where to slot my traumas so they have pieces in every file. After EMDR they now have their own file and I can access them when I want to or just let them stay in the file. My trauma no longer defines me.”

— Aimee Grimm, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Montrose, CA

I am an EMDRIA-Trained therapist and have been for about 2 years, working with children and young adults to help them through traumatic events of varying severity.

— Estepha Francisque, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Sacramento, CA
 

I completed EMDR training in 2016 and have been using the technique in my practice ever since. I have also completed workshops on special topics in EMDR and continue to grow my skills as often as possible.

— Lacey Stewart, Counselor in Albuquerque, NM
 

When something disturbing happens it gets stored in the brain in a way that our human system feels that event is either going to happen again at any moment, or is happening now. When some event happens that may be similar or just has an element that reminds the system of that disturbing event, the brain reacts as if the original disturbing event is happening. EMDR helps to move the storage of that memory to a more functional part of the brain

— jan weber, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Bloomington, MN

Have completed training through the EMDR institute, Inc. and am in training for Attachment-Focused EMDR therapy. I apply all appropriate stages of EMDR based on clients’ unique needs.

— Jaclin Belabri, Counselor in Vancouver, WA
 

EMDR is becoming widely used to treat trauma. This method helps the body reveal what has long since been hidden from our consciousness related to past trauma or painful events. This can keep us feeling stuck, anxious & depressed in a every day. Chronic overwhelming feelings often indicate the body is working hard to manage outward stress/experiences while managing inward fears from the past. It is possible to feel more safe & at ease in your body as well as move forward in your life.

— Kathleen Thompson, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

In 2014 I was trained in EMDR and found how amazing it is both personally and professionally. I have seen huge transformations and growth happen with EMDR, and so I continue to use it regularly with clients and continue to get advanced training in it. While EMDR is a very powerful therapy for people that have experienced trauma, it also drastically helps reduce anxiety and can uplift depressed moods.

— Lindsey Lowrance, Counselor in Lakewood, CO

I am trained in EMDR and I use it as a tool among other tools to work though trauma that is blocking moment as it relates to relational dynamics.

— Kristine Sandt, Counselor in Glendale, AZ
 

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is a fairly new, nontraditional type of psychotherapy. EMDR is a psychotherapy that enables people to heal from the symptoms and emotional distress that are the result of disturbing life experiences. At Livewell we are trained and certified in using this therapeutic approach to help people who suffer from trauma, anxiety, panic, disturbing memories, post traumatic stress and many other emotional problems.

— Livewell Behavioral Health, Marriage & Family Therapist in Fresno, CA