Chronic Pain or Illness

Living with chronic pain or long-term illness can be devastating and often brings up feelings of grief, fear, sadness or anger. Sometimes just getting a diagnosis can be difficult and navigating treatment options can be overwhelming and exhausting. Depression is one of the most common mental health problems facing people with chronic pain. Whether you are struggling to accept a recent diagnosis or you’ve been experiencing chronic pain for some time, a mental health expert can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s specialists today.

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I have spent over 5 years of my career working with those living with chronic illness and pain. I have training in Stanford's chronic disease self management program, diabetes prevention and management, Mindfulness, meditation to help you feel empowered and proactive in your health.

— Jennifer Harvey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Livonia, MI

Chronic Pain or Illness can be traumatizing. Being in constant pain, managing the side effects of a treatment, or trying to get through to medical providers means chronic stress. The psychological and biological impact (see Veronique Mead's blog on cell danger response and chronic illness) of chronic stress can cause a person to get stuck in shut down mode (freeze) or anxious mode (fight/flight). By bringing mindfulness, play, and compassion to these experiences, we'll restore your wholeness.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

I completed my entire counseling training working within the cancer/chronic illness field and continue to do so. I am passionate about helping clients discover ways to regain control and feel "patient active" after a serious diagnosis.

— Jill Gray, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in St. Petersburg, FL

In my own life, I have struggled with 14+ years' worth of biotoxin illness that compromised my performance at every level. I understand how hard it is to function amidst lack of compassion & understanding for chronic illness. Everything is a challenge. Cooking, cleaning, organization, focus, memory... No energy for basics, no stamina to do enjoyable things, constant confrontation with grief & death. Constant overwhelm. So much energy just on survival! I get it... Support helps.

— Jen-Mitsuke Peters, Mental Health Counselor in Denver, CO
 

As a an active member of the diabetic community, I can relate to having a chronic condition. It will not be the same as yours. Our pain will be different. However, stressors can be similar of doctors visits, insurance, medication, feeling unwell. The list goes on and on! Let someone with firsthand experience support you through this journey.

— Mallory Striesfeld, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX

Chronic Pain or Illness can be traumatizing. Being in constant pain, managing the side effects of a treatment, or trying to get through to medical providers means chronic stress. The psychological and biological impact (see Veronique Mead's blog on cdr & chronic illness) of chronic stress can cause a person to get stuck in shut down mode (freeze) or anxious mode (fight/flight). Together, we'll bring mindfulness, play, and compassion to these experiences to restore your sense of wholeness.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

Chronic Pain or Illness can be traumatizing. Being in constant pain, managing the side effects of a treatment, or trying to get through to medical providers means chronic stress. The psychological and biological impact (see Veronique Mead's blog on cell danger response and chronic illness) of chronic stress can cause a person to get stuck in shut down mode (freeze) or anxious mode (fight or flight). By bringing mindfulness, play, and compassion to these experiences, we'll restore your wellbeing

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA

You may have just recently been diagnosed with a chronic illness, or you may have been coping with one for years. You are probably exhausted and frustrated with how long it took to get a diagnosis or to find the right treatment. You may feel alone in your experience and like no one understands what you are going through. Therapy can provide education about coping skills for dealing with these changes and emotions, as well as a place to discuss and get support for your experience.

— Ginny Kington, Psychologist in Duluth, GA
 

Dr. Clendaniel is a pediatric psychology who specializes in the treatment of children, adolescents and young adults with anxiety and health-related adjustment issues. She has particular expertise in pain management and treatment of chronic headache and functional gastrointestinal illness.

— Thinking Tree Psychology, Psychologist in SEVERNA PARK, MD

Managing longstanding medical concerns and rehabilitation is draining. I have worked for years with people who manage major illnesses such as diabetes, multiple sclerosis or have history of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) or stroke. Through my work in hospitals and on multidisciplinary teams I have the knowledge and experience to support you as you manage your pain/illness and traversing medical care with providers that often overlook, underappreciate the emotional toll recovery takes.

— K Wortman, Clinical Psychologist in Oakland, CA
 

I have worked with many individuals who suffer with chronic pain conditions. I found that most times the hardest part is the loneliness of chronic pain, especially when it comes from a condition that is not visible to others. People often understand hardship if they can see some proof, but for most painful conditions the proof is not evident. This leaves patients feeling misunderstood and alone in their suffering.

— Mariana Carabantes, Clinical Psychologist in Coral Gables, FL

At least 10% of people with mild acute Covid infection are now thought to fail to make a full recovery from their symptoms and return to their pre-existing level of functioning. Long haulers as they have been colloquially named by the peer community in the US refer to the multi symptom, multi system post viral syndrome. As a former long hauler myself, now mostly recovered, I am working with those who have not in my practice.

— Sally E. Riggs, Psychologist in New York, NY
 

Being diagnosed with a chronic illness is most likely something that you did not expect to happen in your life. Whether you’re struggling with diabetes, an autoimmune disease, cancer, heart disease, or any other form of chronic illness, the effort that it takes to get through a normal day can feel heavy and at times unbearable. Support is provided in counseling to discuss the challenges. You will be offered a compassionate and nonjudgmental space to discuss your experience.

— April Thomas-Kenney, Clinical Social Worker in Fort Morgan, CO

Chronic Pain or Illness can be traumatizing. Being in constant pain, managing the side effects of a treatment, or trying to get through to medical providers means chronic stress. The psychological and biological impact (see Veronique Mead's blog on cdr & chronic illness) of chronic stress can cause a person to get stuck in shut down mode (freeze) or anxious mode (fight/flight). Together, we'll bring mindfulness, play, and compassion to these experiences to restore your sense of wholeness.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

Receiving a medical diagnosis can be life altering. Countless medical appointments, new medications, attempting to maintain some sort of normalcy while feeling frustrated, isolated and perhaps grieving the life you once knew. My own medical struggles and my professional experience have allowed me to connect with my clients and help them move through these difficult moments.

— Kristin Miyoko Papa, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in San Jose, CA

Coping with a chronic illness or pain can be draining and exhausting. It may seem like things will never get better and your life will never be the same. By examining your values, you can discover new priorities that can reinvigorate your life and lead you to growth and satisfaction. Cognitive Behavioral Therapies and Compassion Focused techniques can make a big difference in your wellbeing. Let's work on these together and get you back on track!

— Beth Perlmutter, Clinical Social Worker in Atlanta, GA
 

Chronic Pain or Illness can be traumatizing. Being in constant pain, managing the side effects of a treatment, or trying to get through to medical providers means chronic stress. The psychological and biological impact (see Veronique Mead's blog on cell danger response and chronic illness) of chronic stress can cause a person to get stuck in shut down mode (freeze) or anxious mode (fight/flight). By bringing mindfulness, play, and compassion to these experiences, we'll restore you to wholeness.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA

I spent almost an entire decade shuttered away, homebound with severe fibromyalgia. The agony was constant and there was little relief. Many people did not believe it was a real chronic illness. Now there are millions of people who suffer from Covid-19 Long-Haulers Syndrome, a painful result of contracting the virus (even it was mild at the onset), that can lead to prolonged pain and grounding fatigue. I used my methodology to relieve my pain and get me back to my nearly-best self.

— Anne Graham, Marriage & Family Therapist in Overland Park, KS
 

EMDR and CBT provide greater psychological flexibility in the presence of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors associated with pain. Using functional medicine, we explore how and why illness occurs & balance health by addressing the root causes of a disease. It helps us see the common pathways to disease (e.g., inflammation) the role of diet, stress, & physical activity; sciences of genes and metabolic processes; & the effects of environmental toxins on health and recovery.

— Marissa Harris, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Chicago, IL

Dr. Salomon is experienced in working with chronic and/or complicated health and pain conditions. Her residency and fellowship work in a premier integrative residential treatment program specializing in chronic/complicated health conditions allowed her to work with a multitude of unique/uncommon health conditions. Her ongoing experience in this field has included providing services in hospital, private practice, in-home services, and public speaking.

— Angela Salomon, Psychotherapist in Phoenix, AZ