Chronic Pain or Illness

Living with chronic pain or long-term illness can be devastating and often brings up feelings of grief, fear, sadness or anger. Sometimes just getting a diagnosis can be difficult and navigating treatment options can be overwhelming and exhausting. Depression is one of the most common mental health problems facing people with chronic pain. Whether you are struggling to accept a recent diagnosis or you’ve been experiencing chronic pain for some time, a mental health expert can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s specialists today.

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Meet the specialists

 

Discover everyday practices to help you thrive. Learn how to increase your self-awareness and design the best quality of life for yourself.

— Jenette Mundlin, Associate Professional Counselor in Gresham, OR

My primary training and practice sites have been in pain clinics, HIV clinics, liver clinics, and primary care clinics. Across those experiences I have developed expertise in treating individuals struggling with a body that is not cooperating. I employ evidence-based treatments like ACT and CBT, but also work hard to address ableism, illness stigma, medical trauma, and other experiences that intersect with one's experience of pain and illness.

— Ami Student, Clinical Psychologist
 

I am health psychologist and have worked with people with chronic illness or life limiting illnesses like cancer, autoimmune disease, diabetes, injuries, amputations, functional neurological conditions, GI diseases, as well as many others. I also have worked with clients and their families at the end of their life. Coping with physical symptoms and medical systems can be incredibly stressful and therapy can help improve quality of life while living with medical challenges.

— Amelia Swanson, Clinical Psychologist in Chicago, IL

Living with chronic illness or pain involves regular battles with health insurance companies, figuring out whether dishes or laundry are more crucial when you don’t have enough energy for both, and chronic fatigue no amount of coffee can fix. Here you can get the support you’ve been needing with a therapist who understands the challenges of living with chronic illness in a world that assumes every illness can be cured by a visit to the pharmacist, or through strategic application of turmeric.

— Katie Bautch, Psychologist in Sacramento, CA
 

Did you know that research shows therapy for chronic pain is as effective as painkillers? You can have much more influence over your pain than you'd imagine and you can get back to living a full life. Like pain medications, therapy works on the physical body but it also addresses two areas that medications don't. Whether you are dealing with chronic pain or chronic illness, you and I will work together to find solutions so you can focus on living a vibrant, satisfying life.

— Alicia Polk, Licensed Professional Counselor in Belton, MO

Living with illness, disability, and/or chronic pain can leave you feeling isolated as you navigate changing relationships, medical care, stretched finances, grief for what's been lost, fear about the future, experiences of invisibility/hypervisibility, and anger about how you've been treated. I work from a Disability Justice model, grappling with the ways in which our world often fails to provide accommodation and access, and how our lives become shaped by that lack of care and recognition.

— Abby Weintraub, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in ,
 

Living with illness, disability, and/or chronic pain can leave you feeling isolated as you navigate changing relationships, medical care, stretched finances, grief for what's been lost, fear about the future, experiences of invisibility/hypervisibility, and anger about how you've been treated. I work from a Disability Justice model, grappling with the ways in which our world often fails to provide accommodation and access, and how our lives become shaped by that lack of care and recognition.

— Abby Weintraub, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in ,

I work with people who are chronically ill or have pain and disability. I work from a grief model to help you grieve the "should be" in your life. I can understand that it is incredibly lonely and sad to have to grieve yourself. I am chronically ill myself and understand the ups and down's that you experience. I use EMDR to process the trauma of being chronically ill and navigate the medical and mental health system that is not set up to support success.

— Rachelle Friedman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

My primary training and practice sites have been in pain clinics, HIV clinics, liver clinics, and primary care clinics. Across those experiences I have developed expertise in treating individuals struggling with a body that is not cooperating. I employ evidence-based treatments like ACT and CBT, but also work hard to address ableism, illness stigma, medical trauma, and other experiences that intersect with one's experience of pain and illness.

— Ami Student, Clinical Psychologist

Drawing from CBT, DBT, psychodynamic, and narrative-therapy based approaches, my work surrounding chronic pain / illness aims to build personally-tailored grounding and coping skills in order to support individuals' unique daily needs and, perhaps more importantly, aspires to develop a broader sense of identity/self as a part of ongoing resilience and acceptance of various chronic conditions.

— Daniel Lee, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Brooklyn, NY
 

Chronic pain and illness are prevalent concerns in every community. Living with chronic conditions can feel isolating, confusing, and overwhelming at times. While therapy cannot cure your chronic illness, it can help you learn how to be with your pain and illness in new ways. I use a combination of somatic therapy, mindfulness, expressive arts, and other therapy modalities to help clients bring more awareness and compassion to their bodies. I also help clients make support plans and toolkits.

— Summar Abdallah, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist

Chronic pain and illness change your life significantly. Sometimes, it can be difficult finding answers from doctors and you can feel really hopeless about what to do next. Therapy can be a great place to talk about all of these experiences. I'm very open to finding a way to make therapy a helpful addition to any other treatment you may be having.

— Gina Pellicci, Clinical Social Worker in , NY
 

Pain can cause you to limit social engagements, avoid meet new people and fear things that used to bring you pleasure. It can sometimes feel like a terrible game of which came first, the chicken or the egg. Stress tenses your muscles and can create a flare up of symptoms… but the our bodies naturally respond to pain with fear. When you’re living with a chronic condition finding a way with pain that allows you to live a meaningful and full life is a necessity.

— Sydney Rose, Therapist in New York, NY

Health problems - including sleep issues, sexual concerns, and pain - are increasingly common, but not often discussed in a meaningful, productive way. Your concerns may be related to illnesses or injuries, medications, or normal aging. They may also have an unknown cause but create distress in your life or relationships. I provide an opportunity to address underlying psychological contributions to your health concerns. You will also CBT techniques to have a more fulfilling and healthy life.

— Dr. Jessica Carlile, Clinical Psychologist in Seattle, WA
 

Psychotherapy with clinical hypnosis has been shown to be effective for treating chronic pain to decrease the intensity of pain and how it may interfere with your life. My VA Hospital research Treating Chronic Low Back Pain with Hypnosis or Biofeedback is published. Clinical hypnosis has also been shown to be very effective for treating Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and hotflashes.

— Tenley Fukui, Counselor in Houston, TX

I also work with clients who have been diagnosed with one or more chronic illnesses. They often experience symptoms of anxiety or depression due to the toll that the illness has taken on their lives. We work together to develop a plan to decrease their anxiety and depression and to help them cope with the symptoms of their illness. We also work to help them increase their support network, and to become more willing to ask for help from others since this can often be difficult for them.

— Ginny Kington, Psychologist in Duluth, GA
 

Managing chronic illness as a woman comes with unique challenges, and I specialize in providing empathetic support. In our collaborative journey, we develop coping strategies and a personalized approach to enhance your overall well-being. With a focus on resilience, I guide you in navigating the complexities of living with chronic conditions. Together, we'll empower you to thrive and find joy despite the challenges that chronic illness may bring.

— Cindy Lineberger, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in HICKORY, NC

Managing chronic illness as a woman comes with unique challenges, and I specialize in providing empathetic support. In our collaborative journey, we develop coping strategies and a personalized approach to enhance your overall well-being. With a focus on resilience, I guide you in navigating the complexities of living with chronic conditions. Together, we'll empower you to thrive and find joy despite the challenges that chronic illness may bring.

— Cindy Lineberger, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in HICKORY, NC
 

I have helped hundreds of clients who are actively suffering from chronic pain, chronic illnesses, and debilitating disabilities. Coming-to-terms with your physical struggles, learning how to navigate life with them, and finding your personal strengths all are very useful ways to beat the depression and anxiety that these issues cause. Good therapy can help.

— Joshua Shuman, Psychologist in Beavercreek, OH

Issues resulting from medical conditions often include: grief and loss, family conflict, depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, loss of routine and/or job, trauma, loss of identify, and more. In my work with these populations, I processed their feelings regarding the changes, how to incorporate the changes, while working with them to prevent their entire lives from BEING these changes.

— Keith Elias -Shetland Counseling, LLC, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Mountain Lakes, NJ