Chronic Pain or Illness

Living with chronic pain or long-term illness can be devastating and often brings up feelings of grief, fear, sadness or anger. Sometimes just getting a diagnosis can be difficult and navigating treatment options can be overwhelming and exhausting. Depression is one of the most common mental health problems facing people with chronic pain. Whether you are struggling to accept a recent diagnosis or you’ve been experiencing chronic pain for some time, a mental health expert can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s specialists today.

Meet the specialists

I have worked as a medical social worker in long term care settings, provided in-home mental health counseling to individuals and worked in hospice and palliative care providing counseling to both the patient and their family. Facing a health crisis and living with chronic illness can force you to make a lot of decisions and your resources and support may be limited. You might feel overwhelmed and paralyzed. I can help assess what you need, navigate and access support and resources in CO.

— Tanya Witman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Colorado Springs, CO
 

It is so incredibly frustrating and lonely when your life has been sidelined and your wellbeing obscured. Joining my 6-month support group Connect to Overcome - may be just the ticket. You’ll be listened to with understanding, get peer support, try new ways of relating to your pain and emotions. You’ll learn how to better train your focus to attend to what is underlying your suffering. You can help others by sharing your story and listening deeply with compassion. Starting June 2021-join us!

— Lisa Love, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Serving all of Maine online, ME

Being diagnosed with a chronic illness is most likely something that you did not expect to happen in your life. Whether you’re struggling with diabetes, an autoimmune disease, cancer, heart disease, or any other form of chronic illness, the effort that it takes to get through a normal day can feel heavy and at times unbearable. Support is provided in counseling to discuss the challenges. You will be offered a compassionate and nonjudgmental space to discuss your experience.

— April Thomas-Kenney, Clinical Social Worker in Fort Morgan, CO
 

You may have just recently been diagnosed with a chronic illness, or you may have been coping with one for years. You are probably exhausted and frustrated with how long it took to get a diagnosis or to find the right treatment. You may feel alone in your experience and like no one understands what you are going through. Therapy can provide education about coping skills for dealing with these changes and emotions, as well as a place to discuss and get support for your experience.

— Ginny Kington, Psychologist in Duluth, GA

Living with a chronic condition can be challenging. You may feel alone, misunderstood, and overwhelmed. For some individuals living with a chronic illness and pain can pose significant barriers to overall daily functioning. Social and medical norms often do not consider the individual's actual lived experience. For instance, conditions such as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) may get chalked up to needing to get more exercise, eating healthier, and developing better sleep patterns.

— Patricia Duggan, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Fayetteville, NC
 

Chronic Pain or Illness can be traumatizing. Being in constant pain, managing the side effects of a treatment, or trying to get through to medical providers means chronic stress. The psychological and biological impact (see Veronique Mead's blog on cell danger response and chronic illness) of chronic stress can cause a person to get stuck in shut down mode (freeze) or anxious mode (fight or flight). By bringing mindfulness, play, and compassion to these experiences, we'll restore your wellbeing

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA

Many of my clients are dealing with chronic illnesses, including lime disease, chronic fatigue, and HPA axis dysregulation. It is important to me to support these clients on their journey of acceptance and healing. The issue of chronic illness is personal to me as well as professional. My mother has survived (and thrived), with courage and grace, a chronic illness throughout her life.

— Sarah Murphy, Counselor in Bryn Mawr, PA
 

Psychotherapy with clinical hypnosis has been shown to be effective for treating chronic pain to decrease the intensity of pain and how it may interfere with your life. My VA Hospital research Treating Chronic Low Back Pain with Hypnosis or Biofeedback is published. Clinical hypnosis has also been shown to be very effective for treating Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).

— Tenley Fukui, Counselor in Houston, TX

I completed my entire counseling training working within the cancer/chronic illness field and continue to do so. I am passionate about helping clients discover ways to regain control and feel "patient active" after a serious diagnosis.

— Jill Gray, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in St. Petersburg, FL
 

Being diagnosed with a chronic illness, either personally or to someone you love, can be debilitating. I've worked with individuals, couples, and families navigating grief, loss, and illness. I also consider mental health to be a chronic illness and can be disruptive if not addressed in a safe space. Instead of talking about the illness itself (leave that to your medical team), we'll dig into thoughts, feelings, and emotions that surround the sickness.

— AJ Rich, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Almost every client I've worked with has a chronic medical condition, including fibromyalgia, hydrocephalus, epilepsy, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and many more. I have several chronic conditions myself. I know that it's not all in your head and that you would absolutely "snap out of it" if you could, but you can't.

— Christina Reichert, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Vancouver, WA
 

No matter how long you’ve struggled, no matter how bad the pain might be, there is hope. You deserve a life free from the suffering caused by chronic pain, and I’m here to help make that happen. Drawing on tools from several different therapies, we will work together to help you heal from your chronic pain.

— Jack Rubin, Counselor

Training in treating chronic pain/illness through CBT.

— Lori DeBlaker, Counselor in Clayton, NC
 

Chronic Pain or Illness can be traumatizing. Being in constant pain, managing the side effects of a treatment, or trying to get through to medical providers means chronic stress. The psychological and biological impact (see Veronique Mead's blog on cdr & chronic illness) of chronic stress can cause a person to get stuck in shut down mode (freeze) or anxious mode (fight/flight). Together, we'll bring mindfulness, play, and compassion to these experiences to restore your sense of wholeness.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA

With my multiple health coaching certifications and knowledge as well as personal experience of autoimmune diseases, I work really well with those who have a chronic illness. I understand and I listen wholeheartedly.

— Dr. Lili Wagner, Psychologist in , CA
 

As a an active member of the diabetic community, I can relate to having a chronic condition. It will not be the same as yours. Our pain will be different. However, stressors can be similar of doctors visits, insurance, medication, feeling unwell. The list goes on and on! Let someone with firsthand experience support you through this journey.

— Mallory Striesfeld, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX

Issues resulting from medical conditions often include: grief and loss, family conflict, depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, loss of routine and/or job, trauma, loss of identify, and more. In my work with these populations, I processed their feelings regarding the changes, how to incorporate the changes, while working with them to prevent their entire lives from BEING these changes.

— Keith Elias -Shetland Counseling, LLC, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Parsippany, NJ
 

Chronic Pain or Illness can be traumatizing. Being in constant pain, managing the side effects of a treatment, or trying to get through to medical providers means chronic stress. The psychological and biological impact (see Veronique Mead's blog on cdr & chronic illness) of chronic stress can cause a person to get stuck in shut down mode (freeze) or anxious mode (fight/flight). Together, we'll bring mindfulness, play, and compassion to these experiences to restore your sense of wholeness.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA

I have spent over 5 years of my career working with those living with chronic illness and pain. I have training in Stanford's chronic disease self management program, diabetes prevention and management, Mindfulness, meditation to help you feel empowered and proactive in your health.

— Jennifer Harvey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Livonia, MI
 

Hi, I’m Dr. Catalina. I believe our sexual health is the number one indicator of our mental, physical, social and emotional health. As a clinical psychologist for the past 20 years, I’ve worked with individuals affected by the big guns – cancer, death and dying. Through this work I witnessed the one key factor that motivates one to keep on living – relationships. Relationships are essential to who we are and how we experience life.

— Catalina Lawsin, Psychologist in Beverly Hills, CA