Chronic Pain or Illness

Living with chronic pain or long-term illness can be devastating and often brings up feelings of grief, fear, sadness or anger. Sometimes just getting a diagnosis can be difficult and navigating treatment options can be overwhelming and exhausting. Depression is one of the most common mental health problems facing people with chronic pain. Whether you are struggling to accept a recent diagnosis or you’ve been experiencing chronic pain for some time, a mental health expert can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s specialists today.

Meet the specialists

No matter how long you’ve struggled, no matter how bad the pain might be, there is hope. You deserve a life free from the suffering caused by chronic pain, and I’m here to help make that happen. Drawing on tools from several different therapies, we will work together to help you heal from your chronic pain.

— Jack Rubin, Counselor
 

With my multiple health coaching certifications and knowledge as well as personal experience of autoimmune diseases, I work really well with those who have a chronic illness. I understand and I listen wholeheartedly.

— Dr. Lili Wagner, Psychologist in , CA

Dr. Salomon is experienced in working with chronic and/or complicated health and pain conditions. Her residency and fellowship work in a premier integrative residential treatment program specializing in chronic/complicated health conditions allowed her to work with a multitude of unique/uncommon health conditions. Her ongoing experience in this field has included providing services in hospital, private practice, in-home services, and public speaking.

— Angela Salomon, Psychotherapist in Glendale, AZ
 

Did you know that research shows therapy for chronic pain is as effective as painkillers? You can have much more influence over your pain than you'd imagine and you can get back to living a full life. Like pain medications, therapy works on the physical body but it also addresses two areas that medications don't. Whether you are dealing with chronic pain or chronic illness, you and I will work together to find solutions so you can focus on living a vibrant, satisfying life.

— Alicia Polk, Licensed Professional Counselor in Belton, MO

I have found Mindfulness and CBT to provide greater psychological flexibility in the presence of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors associated with pain. Using functional medicine, we explore how and why illness occurs & balance health by addressing the root causes of a disease. It helps us see the common pathways to disease (e.g., inflammation) the role of diet, stress, & physical activity; sciences of genes and metabolic processes; & the effects of environmental toxins on health and recovery.

— Marissa Harris, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Chicago, IL
 

Chronic Pain or Illness can be traumatizing. Being in constant pain, managing the side effects of a treatment, or trying to get through to medical providers means chronic stress. The psychological and biological impact (see Veronique Mead's blog on cdr & chronic illness) of chronic stress can cause a person to get stuck in shut down mode (freeze) or anxious mode (fight/flight). Together, we'll bring mindfulness, play, and compassion to these experiences to restore your sense of wholeness.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA

Issues resulting from medical conditions often include: grief and loss, family conflict, depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, loss of routine and/or job, trauma, loss of identify, and more. In my work with these populations, I processed their feelings regarding the changes, how to incorporate the changes, while working with them to prevent their entire lives from BEING these changes.

— Keith Elias -Shetland Counseling, LLC, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Parsippany, NJ
 

I spent almost an entire decade shuttered away, homebound with severe fibromyalgia. The agony was constant and there was little relief. Many people did not believe it was a real chronic illness. Now there are millions of people who suffer from Covid-19 Long-Haulers Syndrome, a painful result of contracting the virus (even it was mild at the onset), that can lead to prolonged pain and grounding fatigue. I used my methodology to relieve my pain and get me back to my nearly-best self.

— Anne Graham, Marriage & Family Therapist in Overland Park, KS

As a an active member of the diabetic community, I can relate to having a chronic condition. It will not be the same as yours. Our pain will be different. However, stressors can be similar of doctors visits, insurance, medication, feeling unwell. The list goes on and on! Let someone with firsthand experience support you through this journey.

— Mallory Striesfeld, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX
 

Chronic Pain or Illness can be traumatizing. Being in constant pain, managing the side effects of a treatment, or trying to get through to medical providers means chronic stress. The psychological and biological impact (see Veronique Mead's blog on cell danger response and chronic illness) of chronic stress can cause a person to get stuck in shut down mode (freeze) or anxious mode (fight/flight). By bringing mindfulness, play, and compassion to these experiences, we'll restore your wholeness.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA

As a person with a chronic illness, I understand what it's like to have people say, "you don't look sick or disabled." Yet your pain and suffering are real, and they deserve to be honored. I help people live the best they can with the limitations of their physical wellness, so they can still accomplish what they need and want to do.

— Lisa Larsen, Psychologist in Lancaster, CA
 

Being diagnosed with a chronic illness is most likely something that you did not expect to happen in your life. Whether you’re struggling with diabetes, an autoimmune disease, cancer, heart disease, or any other form of chronic illness, the effort that it takes to get through a normal day can feel heavy and at times unbearable. Support is provided in counseling to discuss the challenges. You will be offered a compassionate and nonjudgmental space to discuss your experience.

— April Thomas-Kenney, Clinical Social Worker in Fort Morgan, CO

Life with chronic pain can be overwhelming and isolating. You grieve the life that you once had and the people and things that were once dear to you. I can help you manage your pain, change your relationship with your pain, and rediscover your life. I live with a chronic pain syndrome and know firsthand how pervasive and infuriating it can be.

— Peter Addy, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Being diagnosed with a chronic illness, either personally or to someone you love, can be debilitating. I've worked with individuals, couples, and families navigating grief, loss, and illness. I also consider mental health to be a chronic illness and can be disruptive if not addressed in a safe space. Instead of talking about the illness itself (leave that to your medical team), we'll dig into thoughts, feelings, and emotions that surround the sickness.

— AJ Rich, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Clendaniel is a pediatric psychology who specializes in the treatment of children, adolescents and young adults with anxiety and health-related adjustment issues. She has particular expertise in pain management and treatment of chronic headache and functional gastrointestinal illness.

— Thinking Tree Psychology, Psychologist in SEVERNA PARK, MD
 

You may have just recently been diagnosed with a chronic illness, or you may have been coping with one for years. You are probably exhausted and frustrated with how long it took to get a diagnosis or to find the right treatment. You may feel alone in your experience and like no one understands what you are going through. Therapy can provide education about coping skills for dealing with these changes and emotions, as well as a place to discuss and get support for your experience.

— Ginny Kington, Psychologist in Duluth, GA

Chronic Pain or Illness can be traumatizing. Being in constant pain, managing the side effects of a treatment, or trying to get through to medical providers means chronic stress. The psychological and biological impact (see Veronique Mead's blog on cell danger response and chronic illness) of chronic stress can cause a person to get stuck in shut down mode (freeze) or anxious mode (fight/flight). By bringing mindfulness, play, and compassion to these experiences, we'll restore you to wholeness.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

I have worked as a medical social worker in long term care settings, provided in-home mental health counseling to individuals and worked in hospice and palliative care providing counseling to both the patient and their family. Facing a health crisis and living with chronic illness can force you to make a lot of decisions and your resources and support may be limited. You might feel overwhelmed and paralyzed. I can help assess what you need, navigate and access support and resources in CO.

— Tanya Witman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Colorado Springs, CO

Chronic Pain or Illness can be traumatizing. Being in constant pain, managing the side effects of a treatment, or trying to get through to medical providers means chronic stress. The psychological and biological impact (see Veronique Mead's blog on cdr & chronic illness) of chronic stress can cause a person to get stuck in shut down mode (freeze) or anxious mode (fight/flight). Together, we'll bring mindfulness, play, and compassion to these experiences to restore your sense of wholeness.

— Allison Grimes, Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

Living with a chronic condition can be challenging. You may feel alone, misunderstood, and overwhelmed. For some individuals living with a chronic illness and pain can pose significant barriers to overall daily functioning. Social and medical norms often do not consider the individual's actual lived experience. For instance, conditions such as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) may get chalked up to needing to get more exercise, eating healthier, and developing better sleep patterns.

— Patricia Duggan, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Asheville, NC