Racial Identity

Racial identity is a multifaceted construct, the development of which is a lifelong process that involves how a person interprets messages about racial groups. Racial identity has been described as the significance and meaning of race in one’s life. Our racial identity is an important part of how we see ourselves and how others see us. Racial identity development is relevant to all racial groups – but typically plays a larger role in the experiences of minorities. Many things can influence an individual’s racial identity, including pop culture and current events. If you are working through issues related to racial identity, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today.

Meet the specialists

There are many individuals who are facing multiple forms of violence through relationships with toxic systems. In my work, I stress that real love does not require one to give up their freedom for the sake of belonging. It’s in the power of our ability to use our voice and to think and feel for ourselves that we find the power to stand alone and stand with others. The ability to do both is what real freedom and real love requires. You deserve to be free and to feel love.

— Julius Peterson, Clinical Social Worker in Decatur, GA
 

My work is informed by my lived experience, including my journey as a woman of color with vitiligo universalis and my lifelong quest to confront internalized misogyny, racism, and ableism. My doctoral dissertation and my subsequent peer-reviewed publications disrupt dominant cultural narratives of racism, colorism, ableism, and heteronormativity.

— Dr. E. Rose Sierra, Psychotherapist in Wichita Falls, TX

As a black man in America i first hand understand and have the lived experience of what it is like being black in this country. As a first generation African American, i also have the lived experience of being raised in two different cultures and navigating the different cultural dynamics.

— Eric Katende, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Helping you work through racial identity and the trauma created by systemic racism and intolerance.

— Kwabena Siaka, Psychotherapist in PORTLAND, OR
 

There are many individuals who are facing multiple forms of violence through relationships with toxic systems. In my work, I stress that real love does not require one to give up their freedom for the sake of belonging. It’s in the power of our ability to use our voice and to think and feel for ourselves that we find the power to stand alone and stand with others. The ability to do both is what real freedom and real love requires. You deserve to be free and to feel love.

— Julius Peterson, Clinical Social Worker in Decatur, GA

Understanding the process behind our racial experiences, whether traumatic, confusing, or anything in between, takes time and effort. I make the concerted choice to truly help any and all people make sense of who they are within the framework - in themselves, from where they're from, and where they are now.

— Sarah Akunebu, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

This challenging time can leave us feeling confused about our identities and place in the world. Whether you are exploring what it means to be an ally, or navigating more complex issues such as biracial, multiracial, or racism or systemic issues, I can provide a safe space to support your feelings. I work within a trauma-informed, and systemic framework while remaining nonjudgemental and kind.

— Gloria Zhang, Psychotherapist in Toronto,

As a person of color living in today's society, it's important to recognize that race matters and continues to show up in our interactions with others. Therapy would focus on how to own your racial identity and not be bogged down by the limitations placed on you due to your racial identity. Therapy is about being your authentic self, but how can you do that if you are constantly masking who you are to not present as the stereotypical version of who others perceive you to be?

— Lastenia Francis, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
 

I'll never forget the first time I filled out a standardized test in school. I was in elementary school and I remember the words "Choose One" being written in bold under the heading "Race." Biracial was not an option. I remember choosing white because I was the only nonwhite student in my class and I didn't want to be different. Thus began a long and complicated relationship with my racial identity. It's hard when you are forced to choose a box and it's hard when others automatically put you in a box. I enjoy helping clients explore the complexities of racial identity and the very real stress that it can cause.

— Anne Rice, Licensed Professional Counselor in Avondale Estates, GA

Many people just like you are struggling with the same concerns and are also looking for help. Have you been told you are "not really black" and feel as if you are not accepted by your own people?

— Christopher Jackson, Counselor in Racine, WI
 

I specialize in working with multi-racial individuals and those from multi-racial, multi-cultural families.

— Loretta Staples, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in New Haven, CT

I work with people who are struggling with racial, ethnic, and cultural identity. This includes multi-racial,multi-ethnic and multi-cultural individuals, and couples in mixed racial or ethnic/cultural partnerships. As well as first generation immigrants and the children of immigrants. I also work with folks who are struggling with their identity at the intersection of their sexuality, gender, spirituality, and dis/ability status.

— Jennie Powe Runde, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

I am a nationally recognized expert for my research and work with biracial, multi-ethnic/racial, and interracial families. I am biracial, Austrian-Hungarian/African American.

— Dr. Patricia D. Johnson, Marriage & Family Therapist in Encino, CA