Trauma Therapy

Trauma is defined as a deeply disturbing, threatening or scary event – everything from sexual assault, war, and violence, to car accidents or other incidents that could cause loss of life. Symptoms of experiencing a trauma may include severe anxiety, anger, nightmares, trouble sleeping, flashbacks to the event, frightening thoughts, avoidance of situations or places, feeling on edge and/or being easily startled. It is not at all uncommon for people who go through something traumatic to have temporary difficulty coping and acute symptoms, but with time, they usually get better. However, if the symptoms last longer than a month, get worse rather than better and affect your ability to function, you may need help. When you are suffering in the aftermath of a trauma, it might feel like you'll never get your life back. The good news is that it can be treated. Trauma therapy will help to improve your symptoms, teach you the skills you need to deal with your trauma and help to build your self-esteem. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s trauma therapy experts today.

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Meet the specialists

 

Certified Eye Movement Desensitization (EMDR) therapist for 20+ years.

— David Brooks, Clinical Psychologist in Bismarck, ND

Trauma from a single incident and/or repeated trauma can be healed. When trauma isn't addressed it can result in maladaptive coping strategies that cause additional psychic pain.

— Lorrie OBrien, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Enfield, CT
 

Trauma therapy can be difficult for many clients. It is important you find a therapist who can help you feel safe and understand the nuances of trauma treatment. We will go at your pace and help you increase relaxation skills and process further how you can move forward without the weight of the trauma. Give me a call today to discuss further how I can help.

— Michael Stokes, Mental Health Counselor in Newport, RI

If you’ve ever experienced a traumatic event or a series of overwhelming circumstances, you probably realize how much impact they can have on your life. Many people describe Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) as being consumed by illogical or excessive fears, hypersensitivity, periods of numbness, overwhelm, panic, depression, anxiety, and irritability. I know these fears, because I have been through my own traumas and done the work of moving from a place of surviving to thriving.

— Katie Markley, Licensed Professional Counselor
 

Trauma from a single incident and/or repeated trauma can be healed. When trauma isn't addressed it can result in maladaptive coping strategies that cause additional psychic pain.

— Lorrie OBrien, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Enfield, CT

I am trained in the following trauma-focused therapies: Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT), Prolonged Exposure (PE) and Cognitive-Behavioral Conjoint Therapy for PTSD (CBCT-PTSD). I have worked with individuals and couples who experienced a wide range of traumatic events.

— Krystal Smith, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

Trauma from a single incident and/or repeated trauma can be healed. When trauma isn't addressed it can result in maladaptive coping strategies that cause additional psychic pain.

— Lorrie OBrien, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Enfield, CT

Often, we think of trauma as the "Big T's": Fire, accident, violence. What we don't often talk about is the cumulative "Little t's" that build up over time. I believe in acknowledging all the trauma, big & small, in an effort to integrate & understand feelings & the behaviors that often go along with them.

— Mary-Rose Granlund, Social Worker in Eagan, MN
 

"Trauma is an injury to the capacity to feel", says Jungian analyst Donald Kalsched. In being raised in an emotionally illiterate family, with no place to turn for support, there is a possibility of trauma. The tendency to dissociate is a defense against unbearable feelings. It is possible to heal through a process that entails the psycho-spiritual integration of all aspects of the Self. A return to the primordial drive into wholeness.

— Dr. Nadia Thalji, Psychotherapist in San Francisco, CA

We sustain varying levels of acute and chronic trauma throughout out lives, so I work from a trauma informed perspective that always seeks to understand the various ways trauma has impacted your lived experience. Together, let's create a space of safety to reintroduce your body to a sense of peace

— Sam Krehel, Mental Health Counselor in , WA
 

A focus on grounding, safety, and containment as well as processing and rebuilding relating to trauma.

— Christine Chenitz, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Kennett Square, PA

I have extensive experience working with clients with PTSD, mostly from childhood trauma. I provide education on PTSD, skills to help clients calm themselves down in the heat of the moment, and I specialize in an evidence-based trauma therapy called Prolonged Exposure.

— Tanner Edwards, Psychotherapist in Kansas City, MO
 

I have certification and training as a Certified Clinical Trauma Professional from the International Association of Trauma Professionals and certification/training as an Accelerated Resolution Therapist. I am also trained in Brainspotting and EMDR. These, together with other trainings and hands-on experience, have provided me with an understanding of the interplay between memory, emotion and distress tolerance and how it impacts trauma and anxiety.

— Meira Greenfeld, Psychotherapist in Phoenix, AZ

NASW VA Professional Certification in Trauma and Resilience Informed Care

— Jenine Stallings, Licensed Professional Counselor in Mechanicsville, VA
 

I have been trained in various treatment modalities for trauma and used them in my work.

— Vilmary Lopez, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Franklin, MA

Most of us have experienced trauma in some form during our life. To that end, I incorporate trauma therapy, when appropriate, to consider how certain experiences may have impacted your mental, behavioral, emotional, physical, and/or spiritual well-being. We have learned that trauma can be passed on genetically in our families so it is vitally important to assess, process, and heal from traumas that may be even intergenerationally affecting you.

— Amy Ruesche, Social Worker in Colorado Springs, CO
 

I have worked with many clients who have experienced trauma and need support working through it. I am currently working towards training in Cognitive Processing Therapy for trauma.

— Caley Johnson, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Bellingham, WA