Psychobiological Approach to Couple Therapy (PACT)

Meet the specialists

A PACT couple session may differ somewhat from what clinicians and couples experience in other forms of couple therapy. A PACT therapist’s focus on moment-to-moment shifts in a client’s face, body, and voice, and each partner’s active involvement in paying close attention to these as a couple. A PACT therapist creates experiences similar to those troubling a relationship and helps the couple work through them in real time during the session. PACT sessions often exceed the 50-minute hour

— Tom Bolls, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX
 

This was the closest category I could pick from to represent the polyvagal and bodymind approaches I use with couples to understand and find compassion for the embodied habits that make it difficult to change behaviors even when we want to. We have all been shaped by those that raised us to have the patterns of regulation we have. Unfortunately, they can have negative consequences on relationships in the present. Once accepted and understood, lasting change is possible.

— Shelly Melroe, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Wayzata, MN

Entrenamiento en PACT- un método para trabajar con parejas con complicaciones

— ANA MARCELA RODRIGUEZ, Marriage & Family Therapist in Frisco, TX
 

PACT looks at what’s really happening in your brain and your emotions when you fight. If you were in a couples therapy session and you were stuck, your therapist might slow you down (we all know how sped up and out of control it can get when you’re in conflict) and help point out what’s happening with your body and your emotions.

— Jor-El Zajatz, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

PACT stands for Psychobiological Approach to Couple Therapy and it has been developed by Stan Tatkin, PsyD. Its goal is to integrate mind-body functioning and give couples the tools to create a safe, “secure-functioning” relationships. PACT has been developed thanks to exciting, cutting-edge research in three areas: Neuroscience, Attachment Theory & Human Arousal.

— Noelle Benach, Counselor in Baltimore, MD
 

PACT was developed out of research in three areas: attachment theory, neuroscience, and the biology of human arousal. Neuroscience provides an understanding of how people act and react within relationships. The biology of human arousal explains the moment-to-moment ability to manage our energy, alertness and ability to engage with others. rPACT uses the science of how our brains work in relationship to help partners form closer, more creative, loving relationships with better communication.

— Jennifer Creson, Counselor in Seattle,

This approach blends attachment theory, developmental neuroscience and arousal regulation in order to help move couples towards a securing functioning relationship. In our work I will focus on moment-to-moment shifts in your face, body, and voice, and ask you to pay close attention to these as a couple. We will create experiences similar to those troubling your relationship and help you work through them in real time during the session.

— Renee Tate, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

PACT was developed out of research in three areas: attachment theory, neuroscience, and the biology of human arousal. Neuroscience provides an understanding of how people act and react within relationships. The biology of human arousal explains the moment-to-moment ability to manage our energy, alertness and ability to engage with others. PACT uses the science of how our brains work in relationship to help partners form closer, more creative, loving relationships with better communication.

— Jennifer Creson, Counselor in Seattle,

A PACT couple session may differ somewhat from what clinicians and couples experience in other forms of couple therapy. A PACT therapist’s focus on moment-to-moment shifts in a client’s face, body, and voice, and each partner’s active involvement in paying close attention to these as a couple. A PACT therapist creates experiences similar to those troubling a relationship and helps the couple work through them in real time during the session. PACT sessions often exceed the 50-minute hour

— Tom Bolls, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX
 

PACT stands for Psychobiological Approach to Couple Therapy and it has been developed by Stan Tatkin, PsyD. Its goal is to integrate mind-body functioning and give couples the tools to create a safe, “secure-functioning” relationships. PACT has been developed thanks to exciting, cutting-edge research in three areas: Neuroscience, Attachment Theory & Human Arousal.

— Susan Stork, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Baltimore, MD

PACT looks at what’s really happening in your brain and your emotions when you fight. If you were in a couples therapy session and you were stuck, your therapist might slow you down (we all know how sped up and out of control it can get when you’re in conflict) and help point out what’s happening with your body and your emotions.

— Jor-El Zajatz, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

PACT stands for Psychobiological Approach to Couple Therapy and it has been developed by Stan Tatkin, PsyD. Its goal is to integrate mind-body functioning and give couples the tools to create a safe, “secure-functioning” relationships. PACT has been developed thanks to exciting, cutting-edge research in three areas: Neuroscience, Attachment Theory & Human Arousal.

— Noelle Benach, Counselor in Baltimore, MD

My approach to couples work is primarily influenced by Psychobiological Approach to Couple Therapy (PACT), which draws upon the body, neuroscience, attachment theory, family systems, mindfulness, psychoanalytic/psychodynamic, and social justice.

— Kelifern Pomeranz, Clinical Psychologist in Menlo Park, CA