Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a classic talk therapy technique that helps increase awareness of negative thinking in order to better handle challenging situations. In addition to helping those with mental health disorders (such as anxiety or depression), CBT is also helpful for anyone who is looking to learn how to manage stressful situations. Therapists that use CBT often have a structured program, which involves a set number of sessions. CBT is frequently paired with other treatments, such as medication, when necessary. Think this approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s CBT experts today.

Meet the specialists

One client said that learning CBT was like getting a gift that keeps on giving. Long after we completed therapy, her CBT superpowers continued to generate positive lasting change. For me, CBT comes closest to matching the amazing range and complexity of the human experience. I love it, have used it for decades, and continue to study it. The vibrant focus on the thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes that drive our habits and relationships brings practical results like no other.

— Valerie Keim, Counselor in Pleasant Hill, CA
 

My primary therapeutic approach is Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT). Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) addresses how negative thoughts affect feelings and behaviors. By applying complementary therapy approaches and techniques, you and I will unearth long-standing behavior patterns or negative perceptions that may be holding you back from experiencing a more fulfilling life.

— Amy Castongia, Counselor in Huntersville, NC

I have used CBT in individual and group therapy sessions for many years. It is very effective and helpful especially to people suffering from addictions.

— Cindy Athey, Counselor in Clearwater, FL
 

I help you identify beliefs that keep you work against you and keep you from being happy. Then I help you learn to challenge those beliefs or replace them with more realistic beliefs.

— Lynne Coon, Counselor in Portland, OR

Rebecca is certified in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and has utilized these techniques to address other challenges that an individual may be facing (e.g. anxiety, depression, etc.).

— Rebecca Neubauer, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Santa Monica, CA
 

I have training on CBT for psychosis and CBT for trauma. CBT can be a powerful tool to change thoughts and behaviors quickly.

— Heather Bell, Clinical Social Worker in Vancouver, WA

I have 20 years clinical experience using CBT as the primary modality of therapy with children, adolescents and adults.

— Jennifer Wendt, Clinical Psychologist in San Diego, CA
 

ACT therapists work a little differently..rather than changing or pushing away thoughts, we teach clients to allow, even welcome, all thoughts and feelings and learn to process and observe them all so we can choose those that move us toward a satisfying life of meaning.

— Julie Noble, Clinical Social Worker in Bethesda, MD
 

My training has CBT (including exposure therapy) at its core. CBT is a goal-oriented psychotherapy treatment that takes a practical approach to problem-solving. Its goal is to change unhelpful patterns of thinking and behavior, which often leads to improvement in the way one feels. CBT is helpful for a variety of problems from anxiety and depression to sleep problems and coping with medical illness, relationship problems and life changes and stress.

— Dr. Laura Simonelli, Psychologist in Harleysville, PA
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) focuses on understanding how our thoughts, behaviors, and mood are all impacted by one another. CBT provides a framework and techniques to address distorted thoughts and distressing behaviors.

— Sage Grazer, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA

I enjoy working with CBT because it helps treat problems and boost mood by modifying dysfunctional thoughts and behaviors through solutions. CBT helps you recognize the unhealthy or unhelpful thoughts and develop problem solving skills. It helps you to develop strategies that can be helpful and can be used in your daily life .

— Erin Gray, Counselor in Lake Mary, FL
 

I use a primary CBT focus to work on changing your thoughts which will impact behavior.

— Courtney Ycaza, Licensed Professional Counselor in Charlotte, NC
 

I've always been told that a theoretical orientation is where you believe the problem stems from. I believe that people have these automatic negative thoughts- "I'm a failure", "I'm worthless", "I'm not good enough", and these nasty thoughts are what drive a lot of what is going on with you (and not in a good way).

— Barbara Maulding, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Algonquin, IL

CBT has been around for a long time and is known to be a tried and true intervention for many different issues. The main point of CBT is to teach people that our thoughts and our behaviors are connected and empower others to work to change those so that they can have more rational thoughts and healthier behaviors.

— Jolene Feeney, Mental Health Counselor in Vancouver, WA
 

I use an eclectic approach that combines Mindfulness-Based CBT and other forms of cognitive therapy, such as ACT and DBT to help recognize negative cognitions and beliefs and incorporate skills to increase adaptive thinking and positive cognitions. Using mindfulness-based cognitive therapies to better understand thinking patterns and how we can change our brain in order to move out of autopilot into healthier and more adaptive practices.

— Cara Maksimow, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in chatham, NJ
 

The magic triangle--thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Learn about the interaction between the three and the powerful way in which you can control the way you see and experience the world. CBT has been the first and main focus of my work for 10 years. It's the only modality I use but the research has shown it to be very effective in most areas of mental health.

— Tricia Norby, Counselor in Madison, WI

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is based on the premise that our thoughts, behaviors, and emotions are all connected. Therefore, when we feel depressed, we are more likely to have depressed thoughts like, “I’m a loser” or “I’m a failure,” We are also more likely to engage in depressive behavior such as isolating. On the other hand, when we feel better we are more likely to have positive thoughts like, “I’m a good person.” We are also more likely to increase positive emotion and self esteem.

— Kathy Hicks, Counselor in Whitehouse, TX
 

I've utilized CBT from the beginning of my career and am certified in Cognitive Processing Therapy for PTSD, which is based in CBT principles. I frequently use CBT in combination with mindfulness and am also skilled in Trauma Focused CBT.

— Donna Gardner-Jacoby, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Crystal Lake, IL

CBT (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy) is the first technique I learned, as a new therapist in training. It is a meat and potatoes, or as the vegetarian that I am, a tofu and broccoli basic and practical approach to sorting out feelings and life circumstances that are going awry. It inspects thinking styles and patterns of assumptions that can lead to faulty logic, which necessarily manages to end in less than ideal decisions and outcomes. Also, the part that emotions play in influencing life choices is considered. This approach is one of several strategies that you may see me using at any given moment in a therapy session. Rather than practice it rigidly, I take its best parts and adapt them to each client's needs, so that choices become easier, and goals are reached more harmoniously with one's personality style.

— Carol Tyler, Psychologist in Bellingham, WA

I use the empirically evidenced skills and techniques of CBT in an integrative format in my work: rather than teaching my clients to use the homework or techniques to "fix" problems, I urge them to learn skills (from CBT) and mindfully integrate them to augment overall healing/progress. I use CBT thoughtfully and intentionally in my work.

— Neil Panchmatia, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

CBT is a standard practice for most mental health therapists. It is a way to look at different situations, beliefs, and behaviors in new, less painful ways. By changing our "paradigms" of thought, we create healthier, more productive ways of viewing the world and ourselves. I often combine CBT with mindfulness and other strategies to help clients find new and better ways to deal with life. It is a helpful practice a client can easily use at home as well as in the office.

— Rebecca Waterston, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Kirkland, WA

My longstanding practice has involved CBT for years. With clients we explore how our thoughts, actions, feelings and behaviors effect each other every day. In our work we identify thinking errors that can harm us in our work to resolve conflicts in our relations and within self esteem challenges. I am also certified in Brene' Brown's work around Shame Resilience which involves exploring our thought processes and how they can hinder us.

— Audrianna Gurr, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

How we think will affect how we act which will affect the results we get. I challenge clients to think in differnt ways, frequenlty resulting in them solving their problems

— Mark Kolodziej, Counselor in Calgary,

What you think as you go through your day affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

Challenge old ways of thinking and question if these painful thoughts are still serving you or if you want to embrace new ways of thinking.

— Dana McNeil, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA

I find that CBT and mindfulness CBT give an excellent framework to assist many different types of clients with various issues and concerns. It is evidence-based and has positive outcomes.

— Heather Douglas, Clinical Social Worker in Charlotte, NC

Cognitive behavior therapy is an evidence-based modality that I learned in graduate school and have used ever cents. It is flexible and can be adapted to almost any issue that a client faces. I bring a more spiritual orientation to my understanding of CBT. The bottom line for me is that when we change our thoughts we change our experience.

— Sarah Murphy, Counselor in Bryn Mawr, PA
 

Cognitive Behavior Therapy continues to be a go-to method for talk-therapy. This method focuses on how our thoughts affect our behaviors. I have extensive training in this area. I have and currently teach facility groups on this modality of therapy.

— LaShanna Stephens, Counselor in Macon, GA

CBT is amazing and being able to address in a very concrete manner how our thought process and our behaviors affect our mental health. We are able to work through very specific behavior changes or challenge specific thinking which will change how we interact and what we believe in the future.

— Amanda Woodard, Licensed Professional Counselor in Centennial, CO
 

CBT works to solve current problems and change unhelpful thinking and behavior. CBT is effective for a variety of conditions, including mood, anxiety, personality, eating, addiction, dependence, tic, and psychotic disorders.

— Kesha Martin, Counselor in San Antonio, TX

I have used CBT for over 12 years in therapy. This approach is based on changing your thoughts from the negative dialog that we each mantra to ourselves daily. I have several different suggestions on how to implement new, positive thinking about yourself, your life, and your situation.

— Christa Vermillera, Counselor in Melbourne, FL
 

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is grounded in the belief that it is a person’s perception of events—rather than the events themselves—that determines how he or she will feel and act. As a cognitive behavioral therapist, I believe that by adjusting our thoughts, we can directly influence our emotions and behavior. CBT involves much more than just sitting and talking about whatever comes to mind. This structured approach ensures that you and I are focused on the goals of each session, ensuring that the time spent in therapy is productive. The person in CBT therapy benefits from a collaborative relationship in which he or she is able to reveal personal issues without fear of judgment and is helped to understand the issues at hand without being told which choices he or she should make. CBT techniques incorporate many different therapeutic tools to help people evaluate their emotional patterns and states and make effective change.

— Robert Nemerovski. Psy.D., Clinical Psychologist in Kentfield, CA

I utilize an integrative approach to therapy that includes Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques, Solution Focused, Narative Therapy, Motivational Interviewing, and Jungian And psychodynamic therapies. I use a multi-pronged approach: we work on the presenting problem(s), which means finding working solutions, gain insight to what underlies them, and find effective coping strategies that you can use that same day.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ

If CBT is a good fit for you then we'll help you to look at the evidence for the negative thoughts and beliefs that influence your emotions. Rather than just believing these negative thoughts are true, we'll help you to be able to take a realistic perspective on situations that will make them easier to cope with. Throughout treatment, we will help you build coping skills such as relaxation techniques, and utilize worksheets to help you understand the relationship between thoughts, emotions, and behaviors.

— Dr. Kevin Hyde, Psychologist in Palm Harbor, FL
 

CBT is a gold-standard approach that can be used to address numerous diagnoses. All of my clinical training has involved CBT approaches, and I integrate CBT into my work.

— Ivy Hall, Psychologist in Berkeley, CA

CBT is my principal theory of practice and I use it to treat depression, anxiety, and PTSD. It's an approach that understands that we're not robots and that our thoughts, emotions, AND behaviors matter. It's a structured therapy and helps you practice all the skills learned in-session outside in the "real world." For this reason, research has shown that CBT has long-lasting effects long after people finish therapy.

— Inga Curry, Clinical Psychologist in SAN DIEGO, CA
 

CBT focuses on challenging and changing unhelpful cognitive distortions (e.g. thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes) and behaviors, improving emotional regulation, and the development of personal coping strategies that target solving current problems. Like Motivational Interviewing it is used for helping people who are seeking rapid change and relief from uncomfortable symptoms that may arise from intrusive thoughts, unwanted habits and irrational beliefs.

— Tony Filanowski, Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY
 

What you think as you go through your day affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a way of helping people identify and change their thought patterns and ways of viewing the world that tend to be unhelpful. The premise is that if you can change your thoughts, you can also change your emotion and behaviors.

— Martha Uhl, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encino, CA

Where your mind goes, your mood goes and then your body follows! Gaining control over these areas can greatly improve how you function in the world.

— Pam Litchford, Licensed Professional Counselor in Columbia, SC
 

How you think has a profound impact on your feelings and your actions. I explore thoughts, feelings, and actions and “flipping the script” to change the negative to the positive.

— Amy Shore, Counselor in Sugar Land, TX

We react at times in ways that are puzzling. These reactions are often based on a set of "automatic thoughts" that occur without our awareness in response to a trigger. Learning how to recognize those thoughts and challenge them can lead to a reduction in stress and an increase in feelings of control and authenticity. "Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom." Viktor Frankl

— Andrea Rogers, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA
 

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a form of psychotherapy that treats problems and boosts happiness by modifying dysfunctional emotions, behaviors, and thoughts. Change Your Thinking To Change Your Behaviors.

— Sandra Farrell, Counselor in MASHPEE, MA
 

Thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are directly connected to one another. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a here-and-now approach to focus on one or two issues which will help problem-solve current issues or struggles. Using CBT by itself, or in conjunction with other forms of therapy, this model of care is thoroughly researched and found to be very successful in the treatment of a wide variety of struggles and needs.

— Christy Livingston, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Healdsburg, CA

A lot of my training and background is in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. CBT helps you retrain your brain to think differently instead of jumping into negative thinking patterns and behavioral patterns. I also love to give homework and believe that CBT homework helps client's stay engaged in between sessions which is helpful for healing.

— Anne Rice, Licensed Professional Counselor in Decatur, GA
 

CBT is a wonderful approach that has a strong research base, showing it to be helpful with a variety of symptoms and issues. The main idea is that our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are all connected. CBT takes a look at each of these three areas to see how they are impacting our lives and works to help give you skills to create positive change.

— Audrey Atkinson, Clinical Psychologist in Davidson, NC

I utilize an integrative approach to therapy that includes Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques, Solution Focused, Narative Therapy, Motivational Interviewing, and Jungian And psychodynamic therapies. I use a multi-pronged approach: we work on the presenting problem(s), which means finding working solutions, gain insight to what underlies them, and find effective coping strategies that you can use that same day.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ
 

I have been working from a CBT perspective for over ten years. My clinical supervision was from a cognitive behavioral therapy clinician and have over three years of intense learning to use CBT. I don't generally use worksheets, but I do challenge negative thinking and thought patterns and use logic during sessions to suss out cognitive behavioral patterns to solicit change in my clients.

— Katie Leikam, Clinical Social Worker in Decatur, GA
 

I have studied CBT in great length and have utilized it in schools, community clinics, and in private practice. Rewiring destructive or unproductive thoughts is a powerful tool and I'd be happy to work with you further under a CBT lens.

— Catharine Pritchard Hawks, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or CBT is form of psychotherapy that treats problems and boosts happiness by modifying dysfunctional emotions, behaviors, and thoughts. CBT focuses on solutions, encouraging patients to challenge distorted cognitions and change destructive patterns of behavior. CBT is helpful for many clients to change their outlook on life and future goals.

— Cheryl Perry, Licensed Professional Counselor in Charlotte, NC
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a mainstay of my clinical work and provides the underpinnings for almost every session. It simply involves becoming conscious of your thoughts, feelings and actions and the precursors to the same so that you can change those thoughts, feelings and actions to achieve a new and different outcome.

— Patricia Lee, Licensed Professional Counselor in COLORADO SPRINGS, CO

I utilize CBT to look at thoughts and beliefs that may be causing distress, then help clients see their distorted patterns and how to challenge/replace them with healthier and more realistic ones.

— Aaron Potratz, Counselor in Tigard, OR
 

Using Cognitive Behavioral Therapies I can help you map the territory of your feelings, thoughts and behaviors. With improved self-knowledge, I can teach you skills to navigate your emotions, behaviors and relationships. In this way you can become your best Self and find peace within.

— Melissa Owens, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

What you think as you go through your day affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

Not getting the results you want? Everything starts with your thinking. You are in control over two things - your thinking and action. In between those two elements, we look at the feelings that drive those actions all leading to results. The thoughts that are getting in your way of feeling confident, feeling capable and thinking of yourself as imperfectly perfect are habits and the good news is new habits can all be learned, no matter your age.

— Joanne Royer, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Acradia, CA
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy works strategically to help you identify your thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and how they all interact to create your internal world.

— Emelie Gagliardo, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

There may be a pattern of thinking or stress you’re caught in that is a barrier to you feeling your best or achieving what you hope to. Unhelpful thought patterns can also become a wedge in our relationships with loved ones or even in work places. An unhealthy habit or toxic thinking are like a weed in the mind, and together we will uproot it and replace it with health thoughts and behaviors.

— Katheryn de Arakal, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA
 

A solution focused therapy that proposes the model that our thoughts, our emotions, and our behaviors are synchronized in such a way that our belief will be associated with emotions that we experience, and our behaviors will be aligned with those. If we make changes in the way that we think about something or the way that we feel about something or the way that we act, then those other components will be affected.

— Douglas Rugh, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Washington, DC

Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) has been shown in more than 1,000 research studies to be effective for many different disorders and problems. CBT is a solution-focused approach to treatment, oriented toward solving problems and learning skills by identifying and replacing self defeating thoughts and behaviors with self affirming ones.

— Deborah Blum, Counselor in North Miami Beach, FL
 

What you think affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

Using the theory of how thoughts, feelings and behaviors influence one another, we can explore how this is impacting your life. Many people with triggers for their maladaptive behaviors, find CBT to be useful in understanding how those behaviors are influenced by past experiences, emotions, automatic thoughts, etc. Working together, we can learn about how to change behavioral responses to things that are happening around you.

— Ande Cappellano, Social Worker in Portland, OR

I have been practicing since CBT since 2009 and feel adept and very skilled at employing this approach.

— Rachel Stapleton, Clinical Social Worker in Kirkland, WA

My Masters Degree is in the CBT track. CBT is a type of psychotherapeutic treatment that helps clients understand that their thoughts influence their feelings and that influences their behaviors. This treatment helps clients become aware of negative thoughts, which reinforce negative behaviors. They learn to develop alternative ways of thinking and behaving. CBT is found to be an effective treatment for a wide range of disorders including PTSD, phobias, anxiety, and depression.

— Paula Kirsch, Clinical Social Worker in Detroit, MI
 

What you think affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

In treating sex offenders, CBT is the treatment of choice to help the offender identify cognitive distortions, including criminal thinking patterns, identifying risk factors, developing a relapse prevention plan and reducing risk of offense or re-offense. CBT can be very effective, especially when combined with other approaches such as transactional analysis, psychodynamic, family and reality therapy.

— Stephen Finstein, Marriage & Family Therapist in Dallas, TX
 

The majority of the interventions that I utilize are CB in nature. I often set goals with clients and ask them to work on specific goals of their choosing between sessions. I believe that understanding our thoughts and core beliefs can help us to change ones that are not helpful or healthy and impact our emotional state and how we cope with difficult emotions. I utilize the ABC technique, journaling, thought stopping and reframing, amongst others.

— Christina McGrath Fair, Counselor in Port St. Lucie, FL

CBT is simply learning to pay attention to how you think; AKA "mindfulness". We all can tend to make "thinking mistakes". In other words, sometimes how we perceive things in a way that causes us to feel stress. There are several common "thinking mistakes". (black & white thinking, over-generalizing, catastrophizing, mindreading, "yes, but" thinking, should statements, etc,) By learning when you fall into these traps, you can begin to learn new ways of thinking about yourself and others. This, in turn, tends to help change the way we feel. It also helps us to feel more in control of our lives.

— Gordon Brewer, Counselor in Kingsport, TN

CBT is based on thoughts - behaviors - feelings. In this type of therapy, the goal is to shift the behavior in order to change the subsequent feelings about the situation. Through practice and thought restructuring, the goal is for this to become habit the client can use throughout their life.

— Amanda Dutton, Licensed Professional Counselor in Gainesville, GA
 

What you think affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

Sometimes the biggest barriers we face are the thoughts in our heads. CBT is a powerful and active technique to help you identify and change negative thought patterns in order to feel better about yourself and your life.

— Megan McDavid, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR

I adore CBT but I rarely use it on its own. In order for the brain to really absorb the logical thinking patterns, one must be calm enough that panic brain doesn't interfere. For this reason I often do groundwork in mindfulness and coping before we work to restructure the thinking patterns. CBT is beautiful because it offers you a skill set that you can use long after you've left therapy. It sets you up to notice your triggers and be able to manage your own emotions rather than suffering through

— Catherine McConnell, Counselor in Arlington, TX
 

I was trained by the Beck Institute (founder Aaron Beck developed CBT) in CBT and use it, along with mindfulness, to treat many issues including depression and anxiety.

— Jenna Rasmussen, Counselor in Portland, OR

CBT helps people to think about their world a bit differently. I help people to look at and to change disruptive beliefs. Positive thoughts tend to have a positive or advantageous impact on a person’s behaviors and emotions. I believe humans tend to have many negative and self-defeating thoughts and beliefs which have a detrimental impact on behaviors, emotions and overall quality of life. In my work, I help people to focus their attention on these disruptive thoughts and beliefs so that those thoughts and beliefs can be adjusted so as to not have such a significant negative impact on a person’s life. I deal with the removal of ‘false’ thoughts and beliefs.

— Melissa Higgins, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in East Brunswick, NJ
 

CBT provides excellent tools to deal with anxiety, depression, OCD, and other road blocks. In a short period of time I can teach you relaxation techniques, mindfulness exercises, and how to refute negative thoughts that clutter your mind so that you can focus on what you truly are passionate about!

— Kellie Collins, Licensed Professional Counselor in Lake Oswego, OR
 

CBT is most useful in helping to reduce symptoms and finding a new way of thinking about things. Mindfulness helps us to turn toward a problem rather than turn away and can bring us to a more relaxed way of being. Let me be your guide in to a calmer life.”

— Radmila Hollnagel, Licensed Professional Counselor in Charlotte, NC

Looking at the feelings-thoughts-behavior model of traditional CBT is what I use to assist you. We examine beliefs and negative thoughts that have been standing in the way of your living a happy and fulfilling life. Together, we change your thinking patterns and therefore your outcomes.

— Lissa Merkel, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA

I've been trained in a variety of CBTs, including Exposure Therapy, Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Dialectical Behavior Therapy, which have been found effective for anxiety disorders, procrastination and major depression, and Borderline Personality Disorder, respectively. I deliver these treatments either "stand alone," or integrated with a more comprehensive treatment package. Although homework is a major component of these treatments, I use a secure client portal my clients use to do their homework electronically. It can even be downloaded on your phone or tablet, so you can implement your treatment on the go.

— Daniel Gaztambide, Psychologist in New York, NY

I received extensive training in CBT throughout my graduate school and post-graduate residency. I have learned how to apply this technique to a wide range of populations and presentations, including depression, anxiety, chronic pain, insomnia, weight management, and smoking cessation. I have utilized CBT for over a decade now.

— Sari Chait, Psychologist in Newton, MA
 

My Masters Degree is in the CBT track. CBT is a type of psychotherapeutic treatment that helps clients understand that their thoughts influence their feelings and that influences their behaviors. This treatment helps clients become aware of negative thoughts, which reinforce negative behaviors. They learn to develop alternative ways of thinking and behaving.

— Paula Kirsch, Clinical Social Worker in Detroit, MI

My approach to counseling is modern and scientific and that is why I tend to use cognitive behavioral therapy in my sessions. I am able to provide you with many tools and techniques to deal with the problem in the here and now. Together we will influence your current way of thinking into something that feels more neutral or positive. There are many CBT interventions that I am able to employ.

— Jeff Guenther, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

CBT is a branch of therapy that focuses on the relationship between thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. As a CBT therapist, I focus on helping clients modify their ways of thinking to improve their ability to cope and to minimize the impact of thoughts on emotions and behavior. Part of this process involves viewing such negative beliefs as hypotheses to be tested, rather than as ultimate truths. CBT is an active form of psychotherapy, with homework assignments outside of session. Together we will decide on therapeutic goals to work towards. Both in session and outside of session, you will begin to "run experiments" to test the hypotheses that your mind forms. Like any good scientist, keeping track of your thoughts, feelings, behaviors, and the interaction between the three will be key data collection that we can use to understand more of what is going on in session.

— Allison Karthaus, Psychologist in Boston, MA

I am trained in CBT, with a certificate from the Institute for Advancement in Human Behavior. I integrate many CBT techniques into my work on a regular basis, whether I use it as a way to help you reframe things that happen to you so that you can feel better about them and let go of the negative feelings, or whether I give you some worksheets to take home and work on in between sessions. CBT is an evidence-based therapy that has many different techniques under it's umbrella. I can give you these tools and skills to change your thinking (cognitive), change what you do (behavior) and change your feelings (my favorite part!)

— Amy McManus, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

I utilize REBTand CBT to address the way thoughts impact our emtions and behaviors. Both strategies help clients quickly identfy patterns of thoughts that make it difficult to live the life they wish to live. I have a specific certification (CBT-I) focused on using CBT for insomnia, chronic pain, trauma, TBI, anxiety and depression.

— Ginger Houghton, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Bloomfield Hills, MI
 

We understand some people need immediate relief to help with mood and anxiety. We got you covered, too! CBT is one of the most effective and research based theories to give you the tools you need to feel like you are in control of your mood and anxiety. We can offer CBT therapy to children, adolescents, and adults!

— Heights Family Counseling, Counselor in Houston, TX

Our thoughts have so much more power than we give them credit for! Understanding our thoughts and the patterns that created them and then challenging those same thoughts can be life-changing. I work with clients to identify the often long held beliefs they hold that might be limiting them from pursing the relationships, careers, or other goals that they desire.

— Lindsay Bong, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

My use of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy involves helping clients identify their problematic narratives and beliefs that are causing behavior or emotional states that are getting in the way of moving toward their desired outcomes. Next is learning to challenge and reframe their problematic narratives or beliefs so they are able to redirect, counter, neutralize or let go, in order to focus more on what they want to happen in their lives, rather than what they don't want to happen.

— M. Douglas Evans, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Ann Arbor, MI

I utilize an integrative approach to therapy that includes Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques, Solution Focused, Narative Therapy, Motivational Interviewing, and Jungian And psychodynamic therapies. I use a multi-pronged approach: we work on the presenting problem(s), which means finding working solutions, gain insight to what underlies them, and find effective coping strategies that you can use that same day.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ
 

CBT focuses on regaining control of our thoughts, which controls our feelings and controls our actions. By utilizing this method, we are able to regain control of actions and consequences that may have gotten lost in anxiety.

— Casey Cullen, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Dallas, TX

Using a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy approach, I help children and their parents understand that their ancient brain ( the cognitive part) tries to trick them to feel worried and scared. These thoughts may seem like they come out of nowhere, but I help kids see how their own "stinking thinking" is what makes them scared. In this approach, I help families understand that their thoughts control their feelings and their behaviors. They can practice different thoughts and choose to behave in different ways. The work is to help families see how their thinking is making them jump to conclusions about bad things that might happen or think that things are really worse than they are. Kids can learn and practice new ways of thinking and new, healthier behaviors.

— S. Abigail McCarrel, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Arcadia, CA
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is based on the premise that our thoughts, behaviors, and emotions are all connected. Therefore, when we feel depressed, we are more likely to have depressed thoughts like, “I’m a loser” or “I’m a failure,” We are also more likely to engage in depressive behavior such as isolating. On the other hand, when we feel better we are more likely to have positive thoughts like, “I’m a good person.” We are also more likely to increase positive emotion and self esteem.

— Kathy Hicks, Counselor in Whitehouse, TX

CBT is based on the idea that the way we think, feel, and behave are all interconnected. You will learn to identify your unhelpful ways of thinking and unhelpful behavior patterns so that you can change the way you feel. You can also expect to learn effective coping strategies for when life gets tough.

— Mallory Lyons, Counselor in Redmond, WA
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) looks at a person's thoughts, feelings and behaviors. I love using CBT with folks because if feels natural to most people. When I use this therapy, I like to give my clients homework to practice what they are learning in session. Don't worry, nothing too hard, but more practical ways to respond and relate to life outside of therapy. It has been helpful with clients to work on the application piece meaning as we walk through thoughts, feelings and behaviors - it is easier to see when, where and how to use it as needed. In our time together, I will help you see what you can change meaning what is in your control and what you cannot change but rather influence to help you live a better life. I help clients establish daily practices that help their thoughts, feelings and behaviors contribute to their overall wellbeing.

— Erica Faulhaber, Licensed Professional Counselor in Lakewood, CO

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a form of psychotherapy that treats problems and boosts happiness by modifying dysfunctional emotions, behaviors, and thoughts. We here at Livewell utilize CBT to help our clients focus on challenging and changing unhelpful thoughts and behaviors, improving emotional regulation, and the development of personal coping strategies that target solving current problems.

— Livewell Behavioral Health, Marriage & Family Therapist in Fresno, CA
 

I have extensive knowledge and experience with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. I have the ability to make it easy to enact effective changes in your life to decrease stress, anxiety, and depression. I accomplish this through helping you identify and then change your thoughts and behaviors to positively impact your emotional state.

— Tatiana Garcia, Licensed Professional Counselor in Carlstadt, NJ
 

Many individuals want concrete steps they can take to make changes in their lives. By using Cognitive Behavioral techniques, I can assist you in making change.

— Raeleen Davis, Licensed Professional Counselor in Rochester Hills, MI

I use CBT to help clients focus on how their thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes can affect their feelings and behaviors. Sometimes looking at something in a new way or from a different perspective can make all the difference.

— Wendela Marsh, Counselor in Salem, OR
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy helps people solve problems by looking at how our thoughts, beliefs and emotions are all connected and how they influence our behavior. In therapy, you can learn to identify problematic ways of thinking that in turn leads to negative emotions and behaviors. We can learn to change negative thought patterns that keep us stuck and replace them with new coping strategies to solve problems and reach goals. It is a very effective method for a wide range of symptoms.

— Melissa Kramer, Clinical Social Worker in Red Bank, NJ

CBT is an evidence based approach that is very collaborative. I have a great deal of respect for my clients, and feel that working with them, and using an approach grounded in scientific research and tested results is one of the ways I honor their time and financial commitment to therapy.

— Jennifer Schermerhorn, Counselor in Black Mountain, NC

CBT is a type of psychotherapy that teaches individuals different ways of thinking, behaving, and reacting to unhelpful and maladaptive thoughts. Cognitive restructuring helps the individual learn how to identify, challenge, and neutralize unhelpful/maladaptive thoughts. Behavioral activation helps the individual learn to overcome obstacles to participating in enjoyable activities.

— Kelifern Pomeranz, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Menlo Park, CA
 

I completed an intensive CBT training in 2013, and fell in love with the treatment model. I completed certification as a cognitive therapist through the Academy of Cognitive Therapy in 2018. CBT helps people make sense of the often confusing and overwhelming issues they are having, and put them in context with other experiences in their live. This helps people understand not only WHY they are experiencing something, but also HOW to counter act it. I find both are equally important!

— Sara Stanizai, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Long Beach, CA

My theoretical orientation as a therapist is most closely described as T.E.A.M./CBT. T.E.A.M. stands for testing, empathy, agenda setting, and methods, and it is an approach that combines techniques from various schools of therapy, all in the service of helping the client get in touch with the things that keep them stuck and feel invited to take steps to get "unstuck." One of the key aspects of this approach is the idea that our "problems" and "symptoms" often reveal positive and even beautiful things about us that we are usually not able to recognize. Thus, by giving voice to these hidden aspects of our problems we can be empowered to either keep things the same or choose to make a change. This is always the client's decision; thus therapy is guided by the client's agenda, not the therapist's idea of what the client needs. For that reason, T.E.A.M. does not use or rely on diagnoses, but rather helps the client address whatever issue they want help with.

— Raquel Muller, Psychologist in Tigard, OR
 

I have been trained in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy including use of Exposure and Response Prevention therapy to address anxiety disorders.

— Kate Sturges, Counselor in Portland, OR

For me, CBT is one of the models that comes closest to matching the amazing range and complexity of the human experience. I love it, have used it for decades, and continue to study it. The vibrant focus on the thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes that drive our habits and relationships brings practical change like no other. My clients report that learning CBT is like getting a gift that keeps on giving. Long after we complete therapy, CBT skills continue to provide lasting positive change.

— Valerie Keim, Counselor in Pleasant Hill, CA
 

I have been trained in CBT and gained my experience while working in different psychiatric facilities.

— Paulishia Augillard, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX

I have been practicing CBT since my graduate internship and have attended multiple in-depth training institutes on how to apply CBT to with special populations and issues (such as OCD, personality disorders, panic disorder, substance use, etc).

— Heather McKenzie, Counselor in Raleigh, NC
 

CBT-I is the first-line treatment for chronic insomnia. Seventy-eighty percent who try CBT-I get significantly better sleep. Improvements can last 10+ years. It is the key to learning to sleep without sleeping pills. It works for insomnia related to depression, anxiety, cancer, pain, childbirth & menopause.

— Ellen Friedman, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX

I utilize CBT alongside most other treatment modalities. I find that cognitive restructuring is one of the most important building blocks that therapist can use to help illicit change in client.

— Valerie Kreger, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Wichita, KS
 

CBT is an evidence based therapy which means that it has a lot of data to support its efficacy. In very simplistic terms what CBT tells us is that our thoughts inform our feelings and that if we can change our thoughts, we can change our feelings. With CBT we work to identify some of the unhelpful thoughts that are contributing to your mood and feelings. Once we identify those thoughts then we start to work on learning ways to challenge those thoughts. CBT uses psychoeducation to help you learn about your thoughts, how those thoughts are impacting you, skills and strategies you can use to challenge those thoughts and improve your mood.

— Gwendolyn Nelson-Terry, Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a long studied and supported treatment approach. We understand that what we think affects how we feel, and that how we feel impacts our behaviors. I work to help you understand your belief and behavior patterns and what kind of story you are creating. We are the authors of our own story. Sometimes we need a little help to rewrite that story.

— Caroline Biber, Clinical Social Worker in Charlotte, NC

This type of therapy is based on the premise that thoughts, emotions and behaviours are all connected and influence one another. That means, that we can intervene at different levels (usually the thoughts come first) to shape your behaviours and improve the way you feel. It's useful to help you get unstuck from unhelpful thought patterns that keep you in a loop of feeling bad (sad, anxious, ashamed, etc.) The way I do it, it's complementary with ACT.

— Zofia Czajkowska, Psychologist in Montreal,
 

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a short-term, goal-oriented psychotherapy treatment that takes a hands-on, practical approach to problem-solving. Its goal is to change patterns of thinking or behavior that are behind people’s difficulties, and so change the way they feel. I have found this modality to be very helpful specifically in the treatment of anxiety and depression.

— Kerri-Anne Brown, Licensed Professional Counselor in Orlando, FL

I utilize an integrative approach to therapy that includes Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques, Solution Focused, Narative Therapy, Motivational Interviewing, and Jungian And psychodynamic therapies. I use a multi-pronged approach: we work on the presenting problem(s), which means finding working solutions, gain insight to what underlies them, and find effective coping strategies that you can use that same day.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ
 

I use CBT to help people identify negative and cognitive distortions in thinking patterns and create new, positive and adaptive thinking strategies to better manage day to day and stressors.

— Cara Maksimow, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in chatham, NJ

My primary therapeutic approach is Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT). Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) addresses how negative thoughts affect feelings and behaviors. By applying complementary therapy approaches and techniques, you and I will unearth long-standing behavior patterns or negative perceptions that may be holding you back from experiencing a more fulfilling life.

— Amy Castongia, Counselor in Huntersville, NC
 

What you think as you go through your day affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

I have years of experience using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. This therapy works great for a variety of issues, especially depression and anxiety.

— Jamie Del, Licensed Professional Counselor in Bridgeville, PA
 

My primary therapeutic approach is Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT). Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) addresses how negative thoughts affect feelings and behaviors. By applying complementary therapy approaches and techniques, you and I will unearth long-standing behavior patterns or negative perceptions that may be holding you back from experiencing a more fulfilling life.

— Amy Castongia, Counselor in Huntersville, NC

I regularly use CBT with clients who are struggling with eating disorders, depression and anxiety. This was one of the main approaches used at the treatment center I worked at for eight years.

— Cassandra Kotlarchik, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Bothell, WA
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy helps people solve problems by looking at how our thoughts, beliefs and emotions are all connected and how they influence our behavior. In therapy, you can learn to identify problematic ways of thinking that in turn leads to negative emotions and behaviors. I will teach you how to change negative thought patterns that keep you stuck and replace them with new coping strategies to solve problems and reach goals. It is very effective for a wide range of symptoms.

— Melissa Kramer, Clinical Social Worker in Red Bank, NJ

I am trained in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and utilize this modality with very young children (ages 3 to 7) who have experienced trauma and are suffering from Posttraumatic Stress symptoms.

— Samantha Pugh, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Lafayette, CO
 

This is an approach I have worked with at length in my schooling and afterwards.

— Raffi Bilek, Counselor in Baltimore, MD

Do you ever pay attention to your thoughts, feelings and behaviors? Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a treatment modality that is based on the cognitive model: the way that individuals perceive a situation is more closely connected to their reaction than the situation itself. A key concept of CBT is helping clients change their unhelpful thinking process and behavior that lead to durable improvement in their mood and functioning. I am a certified Cognitive Behavioral Therapist from the Academy of Cognitive Therapy which sets the highest standards of excellence for cognitive therapists.

— Filippo M. Forni, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Sometimes our thoughts can get us down. But just by thinking about an issue in another way, we feel better. I help clients see new perspectives on the issues that are troubling them. Once you can see things in a new way, different emotions could surface enabling you to take different action.

— Matianna Baldassari, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA

I utilize CBT with clients to support them in challenging and managing their thoughts and in turn support them in regulating mood. Thought logs can be incredibly helpful for this as well as becoming more aware of what behavior chains are and how they can be interrupted.

— Ashley Ellis, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

At the core, CBT recognizes the connection between our feelings, our perceptions and our actions. By examining each of these separately and together, we can recognize patterns that are helping and hurting us. CBT is great for folks with anxiety, depression and works well with kids and adults.

— Erin Copley, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR

I provide a non-judgmental perspective intended to help you make sense of the complex emotions and feelings that may be confusing. Together, we consider and explore your personal situation in a way that leads to fresh understanding. The hope is that these new perspectives will inspire you to change your thoughts and behaviors.

— Peter Rivkees, Counselor in Clermont, FL
 

I use an eclectic approach incorporating cognitive behavioral therapy and other types of CBT, like ACT, DBT and MBCBT to help clients recognize maladaptive thinking patterns and begin to use adaptive, healthy thinking strategies to manage day to day situations and life stressors.

— Cara Maksimow, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in chatham, NJ

What you think affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX