Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a classic talk therapy technique that helps increase awareness of negative thinking in order to better handle challenging situations. In addition to helping those with mental health disorders (such as anxiety or depression), CBT is also helpful for anyone who is looking to learn how to manage stressful situations. Therapists that use CBT often have a structured program, which involves a set number of sessions. CBT is frequently paired with other treatments, such as medication, when necessary. Think this approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s CBT experts today.

Meet the specialists

What you think as you go through your day affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

I received my Certificate in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy from New York University in 2019 after attending their year long intensive course. This is the treatment orientation I use the most. It focuses on how our thoughts, feeling and behaviors are all interconnected and when we can change our reaction to a thought and/or behavior, it can lead to a different feeling. This treatment method is great for people struggling with anxiety, depression, self-esteem and really just about anything!

— Mal Johnson, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

What you think affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is an approach that I also use in every session. I use it to get to the core thoughts and beliefs that may be holding you back from your healing.

— Adrienne Marcellus, Counselor in Asheville, NC

My first training was in CBT, and it was the basis for the treatment I provided for the first ten years of my private practice. I continue to use it for problems and patients who seem likely to benefit. My Desensitization to Intrusive Thoughts protocol is a CBT method that uses mindfulness-based therapy and psychodynamic insight.

— Etan Ben-Ami, Counselor
 

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a psychotherapy model that addresses the patterns of thinking or behavior that are behind people's problems; clients make adjustments to what they are doing that is dysfunctional or not effective, thus changing how they feel.

— Beth Darby, Clinical Social Worker in Brentwood, TN

By using directive CBT techniques, I am able to investigate with you the possible advantages and obstacles of your personal change and facilitate the awareness that they can be effective in bringing about your desired change. We agree on objectives that are evaluated and revised systematically to enhance your progress in therapy. When setbacks happen, I am there to help you reflect upon the skills that I taught you that are not working and adjust approaches while supporting their use.

— Alan Zupka, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in ORLANDO, FL
 

I was trained to use this modality under the supervision of Ivy League doctoral supervisors at USC. I have practiced this modality at all institutions I have been employed.

— Steven Su, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Fullerton, CA

What you think as you go through your day affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

I have been working from a CBT perspective for over ten years. My clinical supervision was from a cognitive behavioral therapy clinician and have over three years of intense learning to use CBT. I don't generally use worksheets, but I do challenge negative thinking and thought patterns and use logic during sessions to suss out cognitive behavioral patterns to solicit change in my clients.

— Katie Leikam, Clinical Social Worker in Decatur, GA

My Doctoral program placed a heavy emphasis on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and traditionally this is the therapy on which I have always relied the most heavily in my practice. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is one the most evidenced base therapies in general and it is particularly effective in working with anxiety.

— Paige L. Freeman, Ph.D., PLLC, Psychologist
 

Julie believes that a person's behavior is driven by their thoughts. She helps client to challenge their thoughts in order to change them, and in turn change their behaviors. Julie helps clients to take small steps to change behaviors so that the change is not overwhelming.

— Julie Dunn, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Naperville, IL

I am a firm believer that changing the way you think and process events and circumstances can allow you to change your life. Perspective and interpretation is the hardest part to shift, but with help, you can transform your life prior to external changes. I am knowledgeable about the various cognitive distortions we use everyday, as well as the techniques to combat them.

— Brittney George, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA
 

I have been trained in CBT while in graduate school. Additionally, I was a field supervisor for interns who were enrolled in CBT courses. I have attended a number of relevant workshops to maintain my skill set and regularly access this model to work with my patients.

— Love Singleton, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in ,

I have utilized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques since beginning my career. I find that it helps clients to obtain skills to take back control over their mind and body. Often our anxiety and depression makes us feel out of control and that can cause fear and panic, often leading these symptoms to worsen. CBT allows you to regain that control and understand what triggers lead to these thought patterns.

— Will Dempsey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker