Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a classic talk therapy technique that helps increase awareness of negative thinking in order to better handle challenging situations. In addition to helping those with mental health disorders (such as anxiety or depression), CBT is also helpful for anyone who is looking to learn how to manage stressful situations. Therapists that use CBT often have a structured program, which involves a set number of sessions. CBT is frequently paired with other treatments, such as medication, when necessary. Think this approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s CBT experts today.

Meet the specialists

 

Simplified, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy considers how our thoughts, feelings, and actions are connected. As we grow our understanding around this, we increase our understanding around the patterns in our lives that we're stuck in, and what needs to change to move forward. I have specialized training in CBT and have also trained in Trauma Focused CBT. Some clients enjoy "traditional" CBT with assigned homework and tasks, while others prefer just using the framework. Either works for me!

— Lacy Alana, Counselor in , TX

CBT is a practical, effective, short-term therapy that is focused on the connections between our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. If you're feeling stuck in a pattern that you can't get out of, CBT can help you figure out why, and develop tools and strategies for breaking that cycle.

— Maya Borgueta, Psychologist in San Francisco, CA
 

For me, CBT is one of the models that comes closest to matching the amazing range and complexity of the human experience. I love it, have used it for decades, and continue to study it. The vibrant focus on the thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes that drive our habits and relationships brings practical change like no other. My clients report that learning CBT is like getting a gift that keeps on giving. Long after we complete therapy, CBT skills continue to provide lasting positive change.

— Valerie Keim, Counselor in Pleasant Hill, CA
 

I completed an intensive CBT training in 2013, and fell in love with the treatment model. I completed certification as a cognitive therapist through the Academy of Cognitive Therapy in 2018. CBT helps people make sense of the often confusing and overwhelming issues they are having, and put them in context with other experiences in their live. This helps people understand not only WHY they are experiencing something, but also HOW to counter act it. I find both are equally important!

— Sara Stanizai, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Long Beach, CA

Using Cognitive Behavioral Therapies I can help you map the territory of your feelings, thoughts and behaviors. With improved self-knowledge, I can teach you skills to navigate your emotions, behaviors and relationships. In this way you can become your best Self and find peace within.

— Melissa Owens, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

My theoretical orientation as a therapist is most closely described as T.E.A.M./CBT. T.E.A.M. stands for testing, empathy, agenda setting, and methods, and it is an approach that combines techniques from various schools of therapy, all in the service of helping the client get in touch with the things that keep them stuck and feel invited to take steps to get "unstuck." One of the key aspects of this approach is the idea that our "problems" and "symptoms" often reveal positive and even beautiful things about us that we are usually not able to recognize. Thus, by giving voice to these hidden aspects of our problems we can be empowered to either keep things the same or choose to make a change. This is always the client's decision; thus therapy is guided by the client's agenda, not the therapist's idea of what the client needs. For that reason, T.E.A.M. does not use or rely on diagnoses, but rather helps the client address whatever issue they want help with.

— Raquel Muller, Psychologist in Tigard, OR

One client said that learning CBT was like getting a gift that keeps on giving. Long after we completed therapy, her CBT superpowers continued to generate positive lasting change. For me, CBT comes closest to matching the amazing range and complexity of the human experience. I love it, have used it for decades, and continue to study it. The vibrant focus on the thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes that drive our habits and relationships brings practical results like no other.

— Valerie Keim, Counselor in Pleasant Hill, CA
 

I often use a type of CBT therapy called CPT (so many acronyms). CPT, or cognitive processing therapy, directly targets the things that cause trauma symptoms, which helps people get better significantly faster - within a matter of 2-3 months rather than years. There’s tons of research and my clients have had great success with this treatment.

— Jennie Lannette Bedsworth, Counselor in Columbia, MO
 

I am trained in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and utilize this modality with very young children (ages 3 to 7) who have experienced trauma and are suffering from Posttraumatic Stress symptoms.

— Samantha Pugh, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Lafayette, CO

How we think will affect how we act which will affect the results we get. I challenge clients to think in differnt ways, frequenlty resulting in them solving their problems

— Mark Kolodziej, Counselor in Calgary,
 

My longstanding practice has involved CBT for years. With clients we explore how our thoughts, actions, feelings and behaviors effect each other every day. In our work we identify thinking errors that can harm us in our work to resolve conflicts in our relations and within self esteem challenges. I am also certified in Brene' Brown's work around Shame Resilience which involves exploring our thought processes and how they can hinder us.

— Audrianna Gurr, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Most of us experience irrational thoughts from time to time, which can lead to very distressing emotions such as anxiety, depression, anger, and resentment. I have substantial training in cognitive-behavioral therapy and have utilized it in my therapeutic work for over the past ten years. Helping clients recognize their unhealthy thought patterns and change them to be more rational and fact-based has provided quick relief for people who have struggled for sometimes years to feel better.

— Sarah Hagen, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Fairfax, VA

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a long studied and supported treatment approach. We understand that what we think affects how we feel, and that how we feel impacts our behaviors. I work to help you understand your belief and behavior patterns and what kind of story you are creating. We are the authors of our own story. Sometimes we need a little help to rewrite that story.

— Caroline Biber, Clinical Social Worker in Charlotte, NC

I have seven years of experience implementing CBT tools and techniques to address the challenges and barriers that my clients are experiencing.

— Beatriz Garcia, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Tustin, CA
 

I have worked with a wide range of conditions both in a community care setting as well as private practice. I encourage clients to identify how their thought processes, beliefs, and self-talk contributes to their symptoms. We explore how they may change these behaviors to enable sustained progress.

— Shawn Beard, Licensed Professional Counselor in Pittsburgh, PA

I have completed numerous training and certificate programs in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. I continue to research CBT and help client's learn to identify thought patterns and behavior patterns and learn to change them through various methods of CBT.

— Julia Ayraud, Counselor in The Woodlands, TX

Cognitive therapy focuses on the belief that our thoughts are influenced by how we feel. This approach is based on the belief that learning comes from personal experience. Therapy will focus on a client’s ability to accept behavior, clarify problems and difficulties, and understand the reasoning behind the importance of setting goals. I am a certified cognitive behavioral therapist from the Academy of Cognitive Therapy which sets the highest standards of excellence in the field.

— Filippo M. Forni, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

CBT is a standard practice for most mental health therapists. It is a way to look at different situations, beliefs, and behaviors in new, less painful ways. By changing our "paradigms" of thought, we create healthier, more productive ways of viewing the world and ourselves. I often combine CBT with mindfulness and other strategies to help clients find new and better ways to deal with life. It is a helpful practice a client can easily use at home as well as in the office.

— Rebecca Waterston, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Kirkland, WA
 

CBT helps people to think about their world a bit differently. I help people to look at and to change disruptive beliefs. Positive thoughts tend to have a positive or advantageous impact on a person’s behaviors and emotions. I believe humans tend to have many negative and self-defeating thoughts and beliefs which have a detrimental impact on behaviors, emotions and overall quality of life. In my work, I help people to focus their attention on these disruptive thoughts and beliefs so that those thoughts and beliefs can be adjusted so as to not have such a significant negative impact on a person’s life. I deal with the removal of ‘false’ thoughts and beliefs.

— Melissa Higgins, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in East Brunswick, NJ
 

I use CBT with almost all of my clients so that they are able to challenge their thoughts and make changes to their behaviors that result in lasting reductions in their symptoms long after therapy is complete.

— Laura Chackes, Clinical Psychologist in Creve Coeur, MO
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy focuses on underlying maladaptive thought patterns and the way they influence our beliefs and behavior. Therapy tends to be problem focused and goal-directed.

— Courtney Brown, in Los Gatos, CA

I am trained in CBT, with a certificate from the Institute for Advancement in Human Behavior. I integrate many CBT techniques into my work on a regular basis, whether I use it as a way to help you reframe things that happen to you so that you can feel better about them and let go of the negative feelings, or whether I give you some worksheets to take home and work on in between sessions. CBT is an evidence-based therapy that has many different techniques under it's umbrella. I can give you these tools and skills to change your thinking (cognitive), change what you do (behavior) and change your feelings (my favorite part!)

— Amy McManus, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Cognitive behavior therapy is an evidence-based modality that I learned in graduate school and have used ever cents. It is flexible and can be adapted to almost any issue that a client faces. I bring a more spiritual orientation to my understanding of CBT. The bottom line for me is that when we change our thoughts we change our experience.

— Sarah Murphy, Counselor in Bryn Mawr, PA

At the core, CBT recognizes the connection between our feelings, our perceptions and our actions. By examining each of these separately and together, we can recognize patterns that are helping and hurting us. CBT is great for folks with anxiety, depression and works well with kids and adults.

— Erin Copley, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR
 

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is grounded in the belief that it is a person’s perception of events—rather than the events themselves—that determines how he or she will feel and act. As a cognitive behavioral therapist, I believe that by adjusting our thoughts, we can directly influence our emotions and behavior. CBT involves much more than just sitting and talking about whatever comes to mind. This structured approach ensures that you and I are focused on the goals of each session, ensuring that the time spent in therapy is productive. The person in CBT therapy benefits from a collaborative relationship in which he or she is able to reveal personal issues without fear of judgment and is helped to understand the issues at hand without being told which choices he or she should make. CBT techniques incorporate many different therapeutic tools to help people evaluate their emotional patterns and states and make effective change.

— Robert Nemerovski. Psy.D., Clinical Psychologist in Kentfield, CA

I focused on the thoughts that clients are having as thoughts lead to feelings and actions. The mind is very powerful.

— David Veach, Counselor in Centennial, CO
 

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy is a highly systematic form of treatment that focuses on directly changing behavior (e.g., avoidance) and thought patterns (e.g., rumination) based on a functional analysis of how these factors are maintaining the psychological problem.

— Michael Greenberg, Clinical Psychologist in Beverly Hills, CA

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy helps people solve problems by looking at how our thoughts, beliefs and emotions are all connected and how they influence our behavior. In therapy, you can learn to identify problematic ways of thinking that in turn leads to negative emotions and behaviors. We can learn to change negative thought patterns that keep us stuck and replace them with new coping strategies to solve problems and reach goals. It is a very effective method for a wide range of symptoms.

— Melissa Kramer, Clinical Social Worker in Middletown, NJ

CBT is often a great tool to help clients feel a sense of control in their lives by challenging dysfunctional beliefs and changing unhealthy behaviors. I have extensive training in this therapy modality.

— Catherine Bitney, Clinical Psychologist in Austin, TX

I have been using CBT since I started providing therapy on 1997 and focus more on it when I started working with women suffering from Postpartum Depression. I have gotten several trainings about CBT.

— Ana Romero, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in MIRAMAR, FL, FL
 

Cognitive-behavioral therapy is a research supported approach that starts with the idea that what or how we think about a situation and what we do has a huge impact on how we feel. In order to feel different, we often need to think different and do different. First.

— Dr. Laura Forsyth, Psychologist in Camarillo, CA

I found that CBT really resonated with me and my natural style. I have found that most of the time we are our own worst critic. When people struggle with anxiety or depression, it is often from their inner dialogue that puts them down and thinks even the smallest things are drastic. With CBT, we can look at those deeper thoughts that may be keeping you from feeling your best and can find gentle and supportive ways to creatively challenge them so that you can make the dark side go away.

— Lindsey Lowrance, Counselor in Lakewood, CO

My Masters Degree is in the CBT track. CBT is a type of psychotherapeutic treatment that helps clients understand that their thoughts influence their feelings and that influences their behaviors. This treatment helps clients become aware of negative thoughts, which reinforce negative behaviors. They learn to develop alternative ways of thinking and behaving.

— Paula Kirsch, Clinical Social Worker in Detroit, MI
 

What you think as you go through your day affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

I've found great success operating from an eclectic framework, including the use of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. CBT encouraged clients to challenge unhelpful or maladaptive thoughts that bring around unwanted or unhealthy actions. Doing this can improve emotional regulation, understanding, and processing. At the heart of this is discovering the core beliefs we have about ourselves and how they've influenced and effected our thoughts and decision-making.

— Sarah Fink, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Boston, MA

CBT is an approach that helps you feel better by teaching you about the connection between your thoughts, actions, and feelings. I help you find the tools to help you identify, challenge, and change your thoughts. You'll also change some of the things you are doing in life so you can be more aligned with what you want and need to feel good. You'll slowly work up a ladder of facing your fears, so you can move forward with confidence and less worry.

— Megan Carney, Psychologist in Meridian, ID
 

Working with your thoughts, feelings and behaviors is the trifecta in improving your overall wellness. There are many techniques that can help relieve symptoms, and increasing coping skills including relaxation techniques while also understanding negative automatic thoughts is a great place to start.

— Lisa Lovelace, Clinical Psychologist in , MN
 

Our therapists have received additional training in CBT to help clients identify and restructure dysfunctional cognitions, modify maladaptive beliefs, break lifelong patterns of destructive behavior, face their fears, eliminate nightmares, address insomnia, manage anger, as well as help them develop healthier tools and alternative coping skills.

— Anderson Counseling & Education, Licensed Professional Counselor in Fort Mill, SC

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is an evidenced-based treatment, which means that the effectiveness of CBT has been supported by research. CBT skills will help first teach you about the interaction between your thoughts, feelings, and actions. You will learn to identify, examine, and change unhelpful, negative-based thoughts. For instance, an automatic thought (i.e., "if I don't make people laugh, they will reject me") leads to certain negative feelings and behaviors.

— Marshall Bewley, Psychologist in Denton, TX
 

The mind is powerful but emotions can hijack thinking leading to behaviors that can negatively effect daily living. Approaching the mind with evidence to challenge thoughts can help alter this behavior. CBT builds resiliency leading to optimum mental health.

— DEANA KAHLE, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Bernardino, CA

I help you identify beliefs that keep you work against you and keep you from being happy. Then I help you learn to challenge those beliefs or replace them with more realistic beliefs.

— Lynne Coon, Counselor in Portland, OR

CBT is a type of psychotherapy that teaches individuals different ways of thinking, behaving, and reacting to unhelpful and maladaptive thoughts. Cognitive restructuring helps the individual learn how to identify, challenge, and neutralize unhelpful/maladaptive thoughts. Behavioral activation helps the individual learn to overcome obstacles to participating in enjoyable activities.

— Kelifern Pomeranz, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Menlo Park, CA
 

I utilize an integrative approach to therapy that includes Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques, Solution Focused, Narative Therapy, Motivational Interviewing, and Jungian And psychodynamic therapies. I use a multi-pronged approach: we work on the presenting problem(s), which means finding working solutions, gain insight to what underlies them, and find effective coping strategies that you can use that same day.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ

What you think affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

The premise of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is that our thoughts or perceptions of events in the world become skewed or distorted thereby affecting how we feel and ultimately how we behave or act.

— Noorayne Chevalier, Therapist in Detroit, MI

I am also trained in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, which can be helpful across many psychological domains.

— Patty Cowan, Psychologist in Lawrence, KS
 

I also provide Trauma Focused Cognitive Behaviors Therapy for children ages 2-17 who have experienced trauma as a result from natural disaster, car accidents, abuse, loss of a loved one, adjustment to parent separation/divorce or any other significant life stressor.

— Dawn Hamilton, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Redlands, CA

I utilize an integrative approach to therapy that includes Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques, Solution Focused, Narative Therapy, Motivational Interviewing, and Jungian And psychodynamic therapies. I use a multi-pronged approach: we work on the presenting problem(s), which means finding working solutions, gain insight to what underlies them, and find effective coping strategies that you can use that same day.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ

I have 20 years clinical experience using CBT as the primary modality of therapy with children, adolescents and adults.

— Jennifer Wendt, Clinical Psychologist in San Diego, CA
 

What you think affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a form of psychotherapy that treats problems and boosts happiness by modifying dysfunctional emotions, behaviors, and thoughts. Unlike traditional Freudian psychoanalysis, which probes childhood wounds to get at the root causes of conflict, CBT focuses on solutions, encouraging patients to challenge distorted cognitions and change destructive patterns of behavior.

— Gwen Kinney, Counselor in Austin, TX
 

* Reduce cognitive distortions to reduce anxiety and depression symptoms * Increase realistic and reasonable thinking habits

— Barbara Schnichels, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Burnsville, MN

I use the empirically evidenced skills and techniques of CBT in an integrative format in my work: rather than teaching my clients to use the homework or techniques to "fix" problems, I urge them to learn skills (from CBT) and mindfully integrate them to augment overall healing/progress. I use CBT thoughtfully and intentionally in my work.

— Neil Panchmatia, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Sometimes our thoughts can get us down. But just by thinking about an issue in another way, we feel better. I help clients see new perspectives on the issues that are troubling them. Once you can see things in a new way, different emotions could surface enabling you to take different action.

— Matianna Baldassari, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

CBT is based on the idea that the way we think, feel, and behave are all interconnected. You will learn to identify your unhelpful ways of thinking and unhelpful behavior patterns so that you can change the way you feel. You can also expect to learn effective coping strategies for when life gets tough.

— Mallory Lyons, Counselor in Redmond, WA

CBT is an active approach that challenges unhelpful thoughts and behaviors while encouraging change through managing emotions, learning positive ways to cope, and using problem solving to pragmatically deal with mental health symptoms. It utilizes worksheets and homework assignments to help gain a better understanding of symptoms and the thought process around them.

— Jacqueline "Jackie" Abeling, Marriage & Family Therapist in Maple Grove, MN
 

My use of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy involves helping clients identify their problematic narratives and beliefs that are causing behavior or emotional states that are getting in the way of moving toward their desired outcomes. Next is learning to challenge and reframe their problematic narratives or beliefs so they are able to redirect, counter, neutralize or let go, in order to focus more on what they want to happen in their lives, rather than what they don't want to happen.

— M. Douglas Evans, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Ann Arbor, MI

I've been trained in a variety of CBTs, including Exposure Therapy, Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Dialectical Behavior Therapy, which have been found effective for anxiety disorders, procrastination and major depression, and Borderline Personality Disorder, respectively. I deliver these treatments either "stand alone," or integrated with a more comprehensive treatment package. Although homework is a major component of these treatments, I use a secure client portal my clients use to do their homework electronically. It can even be downloaded on your phone or tablet, so you can implement your treatment on the go.

— Daniel Gaztambide, Psychologist in New York, NY
 

Using the theory of how thoughts, feelings and behaviors influence one another, we can explore how this is impacting your life. Many people with triggers for their maladaptive behaviors, find CBT to be useful in understanding how those behaviors are influenced by past experiences, emotions, automatic thoughts, etc. Working together, we can learn about how to change behavioral responses to things that are happening around you.

— Ande Cappellano, Social Worker in Portland, OR

I have a very strong background in cognitive behavioral therapy due to my first work in the field (as a bachelor level social worker) focusing on behavioral modification. My work is heavily influenced by my understanding of the connection between our thoughts, feelings, and behavior and I've had the opportunity to help children, teens, and adults address various issues through cognitive behavioral treatment. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is the preferred approach for many particular problems.

— Debbie Duquette, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Huntsville, AL

I use a solution focused therapy that proposes the model that our thoughts, our emotions, and our behaviors are synchronized in such a way that our belief will be associated with emotions that we experience, and our behaviors will be aligned with those. If we make changes in the way that we think about something or the way that we feel about something or the way that we act, then those other components will be affected.

— Douglas Rugh, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Washington, DC
 

I utilize an integrative approach to therapy that includes Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques, Solution Focused, Narative Therapy, Motivational Interviewing, and Jungian And psychodynamic therapies. I use a multi-pronged approach: we work on the presenting problem(s), which means finding working solutions, gain insight to what underlies them, and find effective coping strategies that you can use that same day.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ

I have been using CBT and DBT (dialectical behavior therapy) as part of my treatment approach for the last 5 years, and am CBT+ certified. CBT and DBT are skills-based modalities. This type of treatment combines processing thought patterns with practical skills to tackle day to day roadblocks. It is a practical approach to treatment and can be incredibly effective, especially for folks who may feel nervous about traditional talk therapy or who are looking for a more short-term intervention.

— Kian Leggett, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Tacoma, WA
 

Not getting the results you want? Everything starts with your thinking. You are in control over two things - your thinking and action. In between those two elements, we look at the feelings that drive those actions all leading to results. The thoughts that are getting in your way of feeling confident, feeling capable and thinking of yourself as imperfectly perfect are habits and the good news is new habits can all be learned, no matter your age.

— Joanne Royer, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA

CBT provides excellent tools to deal with anxiety, depression, OCD, and other road blocks. In a short period of time I can teach you relaxation techniques, mindfulness exercises, and how to refute negative thoughts that clutter your mind so that you can focus on what you truly are passionate about!

— Kellie Collins, Licensed Professional Counselor in Lake Oswego, OR
 

CBT involves understanding what messages we often say to ourselves. We will identify what are called cognitive distortions, which influence the way we perceive and interpret the world. Common cognitive distortions I see with clients who have experienced domestic violence include all-or-nothing thinking (or polarized thinking), catastrophizing, overgeneralization, and minimization. These, in turn, affect how our thoughts, feelings, and actions.

— Nathan Jacquez, Counselor in Salt Lake City, UT

I have worked with a wide range of conditions both in community care as well as in my private practice. I encourage clients to identify underlying beliefs and determine how they work for them. We work to change the inner-dialogue that may hinder progress.

— Shawn Beard, Licensed Professional Counselor in Pittsburgh, PA
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy works strategically to help you identify your thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and how they all interact to create your internal world.

— Emelie Gagliardo, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

CBT is applicable not just in session to explore why things are challenging but in your day-to-day life - I use CBT techniques in my personal life as well. It just makes sense to consider how your thoughts, feelings and actions are all impacting one another to find ways to make changes. CBT can be used with kids, teens and adults, but it will look a little different in each case.

— Laura Morlok, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Damascus, MD
 

I utilize CBT alongside most other treatment modalities. I find that cognitive restructuring is one of the most important building blocks that therapist can use to help illicit change in client.

— Valerie Kreger, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Wichita, KS

CBT reveals the relationship between beliefs, thoughts, and feelings, and the behaviors that follow. CBT can help us understand your default thought patterns in order to reframe and rewrite your personal narrative.

— Hannah Donahue, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Sometimes the thoughts we have are just not working for us. We hold on to past beliefs that no longer serve a purpose or don't fit our current situation. With CBT, I will help you break through barriers in thought that may be holding you back.

— Shiloh Werkmeister, Counselor in Troy, MO

CBT is a problem focused and action oriented form of therapy. It aims at identifying problems and practicing solutions to modify undesirable behaviors and/or thinking patterns. I found this approach particularly effective in helping children and clients with OCD tendencies. Depending on your preference and goals, I'm able to provide a structured framework with concrete tools such as homework, in session exercises, etc.

— Yiwen Fan, Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a way of helping people identify and change their thought patterns and ways of viewing the world that tend to be unhelpful. The premise is that if you can change your thoughts, you can also change your emotion and behaviors.

— Martha Uhl, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encino, CA

I was trained by the Beck Institute (founder Aaron Beck developed CBT) in CBT and use it, along with mindfulness, to treat many issues including depression and anxiety.

— Jenna Rasmussen, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy helps people solve problems by looking at how our thoughts, beliefs and emotions are all connected and how they influence our behavior. In therapy, you can learn to identify problematic ways of thinking that in turn leads to negative emotions and behaviors. I will teach you how to change negative thought patterns that keep you stuck and replace them with new coping strategies to solve problems and reach goals. It is very effective for a wide range of symptoms.

— Melissa Kramer, Clinical Social Worker in Middletown, NJ
 

As simple as it may sound, CBT is tried and true because it really helps us take responsibility and accountability for our own actions. Once we realize that out thoughts (cognitions), feelings (emotions) and actions (behaviors) are linked, we can create healthier mindsets, respond rather than react to our surroundings, and behave in ways that are beneficial rather than detrimental.

— Sky Ross, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Although I’d be considered more integrative and holistically centerered in my therapeutic approaches, I’m a huge proponent of CBT, DBT (Dialectical Behavioral Therapy) and ACT (Acceptance and Commitment Therapy)...the latter two are offshoots of CBT. I have found these evidence-based interventions invaluable. Studies have shown that DBT actually changes the brains of individuals diagnosed with BPD and my work with CBT has shifted the core beliefs and lives of many clients.

— Gail Wodkiewicz, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Staten Island, NY
 

I have training on CBT for psychosis and CBT for trauma. CBT can be a powerful tool to change thoughts and behaviors quickly.

— Heather Bell, Clinical Social Worker in Clackamas, OR
 

What you think affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

I find that CBT and mindfulness CBT give an excellent framework to assist many different types of clients with various issues and concerns. It is evidence-based and has positive outcomes.

— Heather Douglas, Clinical Social Worker in Charlotte, NC
 

CBT is often referred to as the Gold Standard and can be found is almost every therapy room. The basis of understanding the connection between our thoughts, our feelings and our actions, I believe, is paramount in making effective and lasting changes in our life.

— Lisa Dyck, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Westlake Village, CA
 

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a form of psychotherapy that treats problems and boosts happiness by modifying dysfunctional emotions, behaviors, and thoughts. We here at Livewell utilize CBT to help our clients focus on challenging and changing unhelpful thoughts and behaviors, improving emotional regulation, and the development of personal coping strategies that target solving current problems.

— Livewell Behavioral Health, Marriage & Family Therapist in Fresno, CA
 

CBT is an evidence based therapy which means that it has a lot of data to support its efficacy. In very simplistic terms what CBT tells us is that our thoughts inform our feelings and that if we can change our thoughts, we can change our feelings. With CBT we work to identify some of the unhelpful thoughts that are contributing to your mood and feelings. Once we identify those thoughts then we start to work on learning ways to challenge those thoughts. CBT uses psychoeducation to help you learn about your thoughts, how those thoughts are impacting you, skills and strategies you can use to challenge those thoughts and improve your mood.

— Gwendolyn Nelson-Terry, Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

The environment we grow up in greatly impacts what we believe about ourselves. Consider waking up every day believing: I'm worthy of love. I'm secure. I'm confident. I'm strong. I'm enough. Imagine the feelings that these thoughts would evoke: deep joy, happiness, contentedness. How would waking up with these feelings everyday impact your behaviors? CBT helps us to adjust core beliefs you knowingly or subconsiously have about yourself, the emotions they evoke, and the actions they cause.

— Erin Grasmeyer, Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Alamitos, CA
 

I specialize in a specific type of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) called Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT). REBT is a psycho-educational approach to counseling and the pioneering form of CBT. REBT promotes psychological health and wellness by helping people to challenge and replace their self-defeating beliefs with healthier alternatives. REBT is active and directive, present-centered, goal-oriented, and solution-focused, producing long-term results in a shorter amount of time.

— Jaclyn Hall, Registered Mental Health Counselor Intern in Tampa, FL

Effectively identifying and making the connections between their emotions, thoughts, and behaviors. The client becomes more aware of the importance of how their emotions (and emotional regulation) greatly effect how they either react or respond to situations.

— Edwyna Piert, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Long Beach, CA
 

What you think as you go through your day affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

Do all your relationships end the same way? Do you seem to be a “magnet” for a certain type of friend/romantic partner/boss/coworker? Sometimes we develop ways of thinking about life that can have a profound negative effect on our happiness. Let me come along side you and explore how you experience life and the unhelpful thinking patterns that have you feeling stuck and repeating events. Take back your power and change your life.

— Tammy Cover, Counselor in Magnolia, TX
 

Our thoughts lead to emotions. We are not helpless victims to our emotions. Yes, some are wired to just be more emotional, depressed, or anxious. But as rational intelligent humans, we have more power in us than we realize. We all have numerous, and often conflicting different voices in our head. However, we are not often fully aware of all of our automatic thoughts and assumptions that end up guiding our emotions in a negative manner. A therapist can help uncover these thoughts.

— Monte Miller, Psychologist in Boerne, TX
 

I have over 20 years' experience successfully working with clients using CBT. I have used this approach in treating a wide range of anxiety concerns (for example, social phobia, panic, worry, and health anxiety), as well as depression and post-traumatic stress. I keep current on developments in CBT through reading, professional conference attendance, and participation in continuing education seminars. As a psychology professor, I also conduct and publish research relevant to CBT.

— Christine Scher, Psychologist in Pasadena, CA

Using a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy approach, I help children and their parents understand that their ancient brain ( the cognitive part) tries to trick them to feel worried and scared. These thoughts may seem like they come out of nowhere, but I help kids see how their own "stinking thinking" is what makes them scared. In this approach, I help families understand that their thoughts control their feelings and their behaviors. They can practice different thoughts and choose to behave in different ways. The work is to help families see how their thinking is making them jump to conclusions about bad things that might happen or think that things are really worse than they are. Kids can learn and practice new ways of thinking and new, healthier behaviors.

— S. Abigail McCarrel, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Arcadia, CA
 

I have experience and training in providing CBT and TFCBT.

— Edlyne Thelusma, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Miramar, FL

I have found CBT to be one of the most effective interventions out there. In CBT I provide psycho education on how thoughts, feelings and behaviors are all connected. I assist clients in identifying negative or unhelpful thoughts, identify the feelings they cause and the behaviors. Through processing clients are able to dispute them and create more helpful thoughts which changes their feelings and behaviors.

— Chris McDonald, Licensed Professional Counselor in Raleigh, NC
 

This is the absolute bare minimum a good counselor aught to possess.

— John Kuykendall, Counselor in Kansas City, MO

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is based on the premise that our thoughts, behaviors, and emotions are all connected. Therefore, when we feel depressed, we are more likely to have depressed thoughts like, “I’m a loser” or “I’m a failure,” We are also more likely to engage in depressive behavior such as isolating. On the other hand, when we feel better we are more likely to have positive thoughts like, “I’m a good person.” We are also more likely to increase positive emotion and self esteem.

— Kathy Hicks, Counselor in Whitehouse, TX
 

We understand some people need immediate relief to help with mood and anxiety. We got you covered, too! CBT is one of the most effective and research based theories to give you the tools you need to feel like you are in control of your mood and anxiety. We can offer CBT therapy to children, adolescents, and adults!

— Heights Family Counseling, Counselor in Houston, TX

ACT therapists work a little differently..rather than changing or pushing away thoughts, we teach clients to allow, even welcome, all thoughts and feelings and learn to process and observe them all so we can choose those that move us toward a satisfying life of meaning.

— Julie Noble, Clinical Social Worker in Bethesda, MD

CBT focuses on challenging and changing unhelpful cognitive distortions (e.g. thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes) and behaviors, improving emotional regulation, and the development of personal coping strategies that target solving current problems. Like Motivational Interviewing it is used for helping people who are seeking rapid change and relief from uncomfortable symptoms that may arise from intrusive thoughts, unwanted habits and irrational beliefs.

— Tony Filanowski, Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY
 

I have been trained in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy including use of Exposure and Response Prevention therapy to address anxiety disorders.

— Kate Sturges, Counselor in Portland, OR

Talk therapy(psychotherapy) is very successful is working with individuals with depression and anxiety. I work with clients on changing thought patterns, and their current emotional state.

— Teresa Meadows, Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY
 

What you think affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) looks at a person's thoughts, feelings and behaviors. I love using CBT with folks because if feels natural to most people. When I use this therapy, I like to give my clients homework to practice what they are learning in session. Don't worry, nothing too hard, but more practical ways to respond and relate to life outside of therapy. It has been helpful with clients to work on the application piece meaning as we walk through thoughts, feelings and behaviors - it is easier to see when, where and how to use it as needed. In our time together, I will help you see what you can change meaning what is in your control and what you cannot change but rather influence to help you live a better life. I help clients establish daily practices that help their thoughts, feelings and behaviors contribute to their overall wellbeing.

— Erica Faulhaber, Licensed Professional Counselor in Lakewood, CO
 

My approach to counseling is modern and scientific and that is why I tend to use cognitive behavioral therapy in my sessions. I am able to provide you with many tools and techniques to deal with the problem in the here and now. Together we will influence your current way of thinking into something that feels more neutral or positive. There are many CBT interventions that I am able to employ.

— Jeff Guenther, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

CBT is simply learning to pay attention to how you think; AKA "mindfulness". We all can tend to make "thinking mistakes". In other words, sometimes how we perceive things in a way that causes us to feel stress. There are several common "thinking mistakes". (black & white thinking, over-generalizing, catastrophizing, mindreading, "yes, but" thinking, should statements, etc,) By learning when you fall into these traps, you can begin to learn new ways of thinking about yourself and others. This, in turn, tends to help change the way we feel. It also helps us to feel more in control of our lives.

— Gordon Brewer, Counselor in Kingsport, TN
 

CBT is a therapy approach connecting the way people think, feel and behave. Our way of thinking affects our actions and behaviors. Thoughts provoke feelings and the other way round. I use CBT techniques to help you change the habits that either do not work for you anymore or even harm you for those that are more helpful. I also like exploring how the language we use affects our worldview and help people shape their way of seeing the world in the most adaptive and positive way.

— Tatiana Morris, Counselor in Rochester, MN

Fully certified in CBT and member of Academy of Cognitive Therapy

— Chelsea Small, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA
 

I enjoy working with CBT because it helps treat problems and boost mood by modifying dysfunctional thoughts and behaviors through solutions. CBT helps you recognize the unhealthy or unhelpful thoughts and develop problem solving skills. It helps you to develop strategies that can be helpful and can be used in your daily life .

— Erin Gray, Counselor in Lake Mary, FL
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is one of the most widely researched and effective treatment approaches used today. Known for its powerful impact on anxiety and depression, CBT is based on the notion that our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors influence one another. My job is to help you change unhelpful patterns in each of these areas to globally improve the joy and fulfillment you experience in your daily life! I have years of training in CBT from both practice and research.

— Saira Malhotra, Therapist in Denver, CO

By using directive CBT techniques, I am able to investigate with you the possible advantages and obstacles of your personal change and facilitate the awareness that they can be effective in bringing about your desired change. We agree on objectives that are evaluated and revised systematically to enhance your progress in therapy. When setbacks happen, I am there to help you reflect upon the skills that I taught you that are not working and adjust approaches while supporting their use.

— Alan Zupka, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in ORLANDO, FL
 

Cognitive behavioral therapy, or CBT, is a short-term therapy technique that can help people find new ways to behave by changing their thought patterns. CBT can help people reduce stress, cope with complicated relationships, deal with grief, and face many other common life challenges.

— Tara Kleinschmidt, Counselor in Vancouver, WA
 

CBT has proven effective for decades and is incorporated in almost every therapy room. Understanding how our thoughts drive our feelings and how our feelings impact our behaviors is, I believe, a cornerstone to lasting change. CBT offers structured exercises that help us see what we do and helps us understand why we do it.

— Lisa Dyck, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Westlake Village, CA

Part of the human experience is the creation of behavioral patterns to help us cope with life. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy help you to understand how the brain is wired and how you can being to silence the critical voice in your mind & learn to choose positive interpretations that lead to more peace of mind. Flexing your 'cognitive muscles' helps you to build resilience and feel more in control of your emotions. Let me help you learn to gain this control in your life.

— Sitka Stueve, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Overland Park, KS
 

It's been known that adjusting our thoughts can lead to positive behavioral changes in our lives. I use this framework to help my clients reframe their situations so they can have more control over how they respond to those situations.

— Katherine Hughes, Clinical Social Worker in Alexandria, VA

CBT stresses the role of thinking patterns in how we feel and what we do. It is based on the belief that our thoughts, rather than people or outside events, cause our negative feelings. I assist you in identifying, testing the reality of, and correcting dysfunctional beliefs underlying your thinking. Then, I can help you modify those thoughts and the behaviors that flow from them. CBT is a structured collaboration between therapist and client and often calls for homework.

— Lauri Shedd, Clinical Social Worker in St Louis, MO
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy focuses on the relationship between what we think, how we feel, and what we do. It emphasizes building skills and can be a great place to start for symptom management. Behavioral therapies offer immediate relief while we work on processing deeper emotional experiences. In session you and I will spend some time reviewing how things have been going since last session, explore patterns that emerge, learning a new skill, and setting goals and homework for next session.

— Kian Leggett, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Tacoma, WA

Our automatic thoughts can be the sole-creator of depression and anxiety. Throughout therapy, I combine CBT with all other modalities I use. Insession and in-between sessions, CBT skills will be used to create a more positive thought process.

— Niki Saigeon, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Colorado Springs, CO
 

I adore CBT but I rarely use it on its own. In order for the brain to really absorb the logical thinking patterns, one must be calm enough that panic brain doesn't interfere. For this reason I often do groundwork in mindfulness and coping before we work to restructure the thinking patterns. CBT is beautiful because it offers you a skill set that you can use long after you've left therapy. It sets you up to notice your triggers and be able to manage your own emotions rather than suffering through

— Catherine McConnell, Counselor in Arlington, TX
 

I utilize Mindfulness Based - Cognitive Therapy and enhancement of mind insight and body awareness. While this approach can be a meaningful resource for countless areas of personal growth, below are some areas of particular specialty. Depression and Anxiety/ Concentration Difficulties/ Relationship Difficulties/ Trauma experiences/ Work and Home Life Balance/ Stress Management.

— Raquele Williams, Psychotherapist, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY
 

CBT is most useful in helping to reduce symptoms and finding a new way of thinking about things. Mindfulness helps us to turn toward a problem rather than turn away and can bring us to a more relaxed way of being. Let me be your guide in to a calmer life.”

— Radmila Hollnagel, Licensed Professional Counselor in Charlotte, NC

Our thoughts have so much more power than we give them credit for! Understanding our thoughts and the patterns that created them and then challenging those same thoughts can be life-changing. I work with clients to identify the often long held beliefs they hold that might be limiting them from pursing the relationships, careers, or other goals that they desire.

— Lindsay Bong, Counselor in Portland, OR

The premise of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is that our thoughts or perceptions of events in the world become skewed or distorted thereby affecting how we feel and ultimately how we behave or act.

— Noorayne Chevalier, Therapist in Detroit, MI
 

Anxiety, Depression as well As self esteem are best approached using CBT. The way you feel affects how you think ang you think the way you feel.

— Cynthia Cruz, Counselor in Chicago, IL

I utilize CBT-CP (a specific protocol for treating chronic pain) using a biopsychosocial framework for pain management. This approach emphasizes treating pain catastrophizing and fear and avoidance behaviors, and teaches ongoing skills such as pacing, meditation and relaxation, sleep hygiene, and provides individuals with a base understanding of how we currently understand chronic pain and how it is different than acute pain.

— Julie Bivins, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Henrico, VA
 

I help clients identify with their irrational thought patterns with intent to identify with and apply a more accurate truth to their lives.

— Janelle Marshall, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX
 

I have used CBT for over 12 years in therapy. This approach is based on changing your thoughts from the negative dialog that we each mantra to ourselves daily. I have several different suggestions on how to implement new, positive thinking about yourself, your life, and your situation.

— Christa Vermillera, Counselor in Melbourne, FL

CBT is the big kid on campus right now for therapy, but for me it just has always made sense. By tracking one's thoughts and challenging them one can also track their behavior with those thoughts. This way of enacting therapy, for me, is giving power back to the client; reminding that you are in the driver's seat of your body. My goal is bring awareness to your thoughts, good or bad, so you can then feel empowered in being explicit in your thoughts and your actions.

— Austin Knight, Counselor in Grand Rapids, MI
 

The gold standard in many cases, CBT is a validating and rational approach to breaking free from all or nothing thinking and behaviors that get in the way of healthy emotion regulation and more helpful ways of thinking about ourselves and the world.

— Meredith Riddick, Counselor in Ashburn, VA
 

CBT is a wonderful approach that has a strong research base, showing it to be helpful with a variety of symptoms and issues. The main idea is that our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are all connected. CBT takes a look at each of these three areas to see how they are impacting our lives and works to help give you skills to create positive change.

— Audrey Atkinson, Clinical Psychologist in Davidson, NC

CBT is a practical, effective, short-term therapy that is focused on the connections between our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. If you're feeling stuck in a pattern that you can't get out of, CBT can help you figure out why, and develop tools and strategies for breaking that cycle.

— Maya Borgueta, Psychologist in San Francisco, CA
 

In cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), we build our sessions around the framework that our thoughts connect to our feelings which then in turn influence our behaviors. We will focus on important techniques you can use to challenge your current thought processes to help redirect your feelings towards giving you the relief that you desire.

— Sara Graff, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Dunedin, FL

I feel confident in my ability to use CBT techniques and interventions. This style makes the most sense to me; our thoughts, feelings and behaviors are all influenced by one another and changing 'one', creates a ripple effect. This can be a very helpful intervention when working with clients who struggle with mood and or anxiety disorders.

— Jaynee Golden, Counselor in West Hollywood, CA
 

I have a certificate in CBT.

— Lili Wagner, Psychologist in Newhall, CA

My Masters Degree is in the CBT track. CBT is a type of psychotherapeutic treatment that helps clients understand that their thoughts influence their feelings and that influences their behaviors. This treatment helps clients become aware of negative thoughts, which reinforce negative behaviors. They learn to develop alternative ways of thinking and behaving. CBT is found to be an effective treatment for a wide range of disorders including PTSD, phobias, anxiety, and depression.

— Paula Kirsch, Clinical Social Worker in Detroit, MI

CBT is a psychotherapy that is based on the cognitive model: the way that individuals perceive a situation is more closely connected to their reaction than the situation itself - Beck. Working with clients I use CBT techniques to help solve current problems and teach you skills to modify dysfunctional thinking and behavior. Changing your unhelpful thinking and behavior can lead to improvement in your mood and functioning.

— Kathleen Nelson, Therapist in Ann Arbor, MI
 

What you think as you go through your day affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

CBT works to solve current problems and change unhelpful thinking and behavior. CBT is effective for a variety of conditions, including mood, anxiety, personality, eating, addiction, dependence, tic, and psychotic disorders.

— Kesha Martin, Counselor in San Antonio, TX
 

I provide a non-judgmental perspective intended to help you make sense of the complex emotions and feelings that may be confusing. Together, we consider and explore your personal situation in a way that leads to fresh understanding. The hope is that these new perspectives will inspire you to change your thoughts and behaviors.

— Peter Rivkees, Counselor in Clermont, FL

In addition to my highly-tuned intuition, I integrate Cognitive Behavioral techniques into my work. These highly effective methods help to increase insight and awareness into what isn’t working, which opens the doors for change.

— James Killian, Licensed Professional Counselor in Woodbridge, CT
 

DescriptionCognitive behavioral therapy is a psycho-social intervention that aims to improve mental health. CBT focuses on challenging and changing unhelpful cognitive distortions and behaviors, improving emotional regulation, and the development of personal coping strategies that target solving current problems.

— Rosemarie Wheeler, Marriage & Family Therapist in Temecula, CA

I completed a 9-month internship at St. Louis Behavioral Medicine Institute, where I worked in their Intensive Outpatient Program for OCD and Anxiety-Related Disorders. In this role I completed training in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Exposure and Response Prevention, which is a powerful-evidence-based therapy for OCD, anxiety, and more.

— Noelle Chandler, Mental Health Counselor in Creve Coeur, MO
 

Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) has been shown in more than 1,000 research studies to be effective for many different disorders and problems. CBT is a solution-focused approach to treatment, oriented toward solving problems and learning skills by identifying and replacing self defeating thoughts and behaviors with self affirming ones.

— Deborah Blum, Counselor in North Miami Beach, FL

I have been practicing CBT since my graduate internship and have attended multiple in-depth training institutes on how to apply CBT to with special populations and issues (such as OCD, personality disorders, panic disorder, substance use, etc).

— Heather McKenzie, Counselor in Cary, NC
 

My work is eclectic in nature but at it's core I believe that by addressing the thought patterns which you have developed over your lifetime we can explore alternative ways of thinking and existing in the world. CBT requires a significant commitment from you; A commitment to experimenting with your daily routines and creating action plans and homework assignments together. Together we will use it to create meaningful and positive change in your life.

— Brian Finnerty, Licensed Professional Counselor in Collingswood, NJ

I have studied CBT extensively and can teach you simple, applicable new ways to think about things and change both your attitude and your feelings about various challenges in your life. This is a practical, hands-on approach to whatever you find distressing.

— Dr. Judi Bloom, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a type of psychotherapeutic treatment that helps patients understand the thoughts and feelings that influence behaviors. CBT is commonly used to treat a wide range of disorders, including phobias, addictions, depression, and anxiety.

— Sheri Galens, Counselor in ,

Looking at the relationship between thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and ways to change thoughts and behaviors to help shift feelings. An evidence-based approach found to be helpful for a range of presenting problems. Can be adapted and used with all age groups, including children.

— Christine Brent, Clinical Social Worker in Rochester, NY
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is based on the premise that our thoughts, behaviors, and emotions are all connected. Therefore, when we feel depressed, we are more likely to have depressed thoughts like, “I’m a loser” or “I’m a failure,” We are also more likely to engage in depressive behavior such as isolating. On the other hand, when we feel better we are more likely to have positive thoughts like, “I’m a good person.” We are also more likely to increase positive emotion and self esteem.

— Kathy Hicks, Counselor in Whitehouse, TX

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or CBT is form of psychotherapy that treats problems and boosts happiness by modifying dysfunctional emotions, behaviors, and thoughts. CBT focuses on solutions, encouraging patients to challenge distorted cognitions and change destructive patterns of behavior. CBT is helpful for many clients to change their outlook on life and future goals.

— Cheryl Perry, Licensed Professional Counselor in Charlotte, NC
 

Looking at the feelings-thoughts-behavior model of traditional CBT is what I use to assist you. We examine beliefs and negative thoughts that have been standing in the way of your living a happy and fulfilling life. Together, we change your thinking patterns and therefore your outcomes.

— Lissa Merkel, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA
 

What you think as you go through your day affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

I received top-notch training in CBT while earning my doctorate at the University of Washington. Additionally, I am currently a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) supervisor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania.

— Alissa Jerud, Clinical Psychologist in Philadelphia, PA
 

I have been trained in CBT and gained my experience while working in different psychiatric facilities.

— Paulishia Augillard, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX

I utilize an integrative approach to therapy that includes Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques, Solution Focused, Narative Therapy, Motivational Interviewing, and Jungian And psychodynamic therapies. I use a multi-pronged approach: we work on the presenting problem(s), which means finding working solutions, gain insight to what underlies them, and find effective coping strategies that you can use that same day.

— Marion Rollings, Psychologist in Hillsborough, NJ
 

I have been working from a CBT perspective for over ten years. My clinical supervision was from a cognitive behavioral therapy clinician and have over three years of intense learning to use CBT. I don't generally use worksheets, but I do challenge negative thinking and thought patterns and use logic during sessions to suss out cognitive behavioral patterns to solicit change in my clients.

— Katie Leikam, Clinical Social Worker in Decatur, GA

I frequently incorporate CBT interventions and techniques into my therapy sessions because I’ve found that it offers valuable tools and resources that have helped my clients to gain coping skills and create new ways of thinking about their experiences that decreases symptoms of distress.

— Rena McGrath, Licensed Professional Counselor in Salem, OR
 

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a form of psychotherapy that treats problems and boosts happiness by modifying dysfunctional emotions, behaviors, and thoughts. Change Your Thinking To Change Your Behaviors.

— Sandra Farrell, Counselor in MASHPEE, MA

Cognitive-behavioral therapy is a research supported approach that starts with the idea that what we think about a situation and what we do has a huge impact on how we feel. In order to feel different, we often need to think different, talk to ourselves different and do different. First.

— Dr. Laura Forsyth, Psychologist in Camarillo, CA

Our therapists have received additional training in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to help clients identify and restructure dysfunctional cognitions, modify maladaptive beliefs, break lifelong patterns of destructive behavior, face their fears, eliminate nightmares, manage anger, address insomnia as well as help them develop healthier tools and alternative coping skills.

— Anderson Counseling & Education, Licensed Professional Counselor in Fort Mill, SC
 

Trained and many years of experience using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to help clients reduce their stress and anxiety and improve their daily life.

— Jax Anderson, Licensed Professional Counselor in Appleton, WI

CBT's foundation is based on the idea that thoughts and perceptions influence behavior. Feeling distressed, in some cases, may distort one’s perception of reality. CBT aims to identify harmful thoughts, assess whether they are an accurate depiction of reality, and if they are not, employ strategies to challenge and overcome these distorted thoughts.

— William Portis, Licensed Professional Counselor in Bloomington, IL

CBT is what I call "the life problem solver". It's amazing how much can change when we start being able to identify and change our cognitive distortions. I generally utilize CBT when treating depression, adjustment issues and anxiety. I even use it for individuals experiencing psychotic disorders.

— Michelle Fortier, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Tallahassee, FL
 

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) treats problems and boosts happiness by modifying difficult emotions, behaviors, and thoughts. CBT focuses on solutions, encouraging patients to identify the hidden beliefs and thoughts that lead to anxiety or depression, or destructive behaviors. Evidence has mounted that CBT can benefit numerous conditions, such as major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, eating disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, and many others.

— Aaron Deri, Marriage & Family Therapist in Scarsdale, NY

I have utilized CBT for anxiety, depression and OCD with a majority of my clients throughout my career as a clinician. It is the leading therapeutic modality for treating these challenges.

— Felicity Colangelo, Clinical Social Worker in Portland, ME
 

We all have the capacity to learn throughout our lifetime. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy uncovers the behavioral patterns that are disrupting your life; and, helps you learn how to rewire your thinking to experience more control over your emotions; silence the critical voice in your mind; & create a more positive outlook in life. Let me help you learn how to rewire your thinking to obtain the positive outlook and energy you need to thrive in your life!

— Sitka Stueve, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Overland Park, KS