Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a classic talk therapy technique that helps increase awareness of negative thinking in order to better handle challenging situations. In addition to helping those with mental health disorders (such as anxiety or depression), CBT is also helpful for anyone who is looking to learn how to manage stressful situations. Therapists that use CBT often have a structured program, which involves a set number of sessions. CBT is frequently paired with other treatments, such as medication, when necessary. Think this approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s CBT experts today.

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First developed to treat the symptoms of PTSD in sexual assault victims, Cognitive Processing Therapy focuses on the impact of the trauma. In CPT, the therapist helps the patient identify negative thoughts related to the event, understand how they can cause stress, replace those thoughts, and cope with the upsetting feelings.

— Dr. Howard Chusid, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Hallandale, FL

What are the thoughts playing on repeat for you? What are the negative spirals your mind falls into? Through CBT, you'll understand how your mind works, reframe unproductive, self-limiting beliefs, and develop personalized strategies to help you feel better. Counteract depression, anxiety, shaky self-esteem, and irritability through research-backed tools found to be most effective and efficient in helping you overcome your challenges.

— Lisa Andresen, LCSW, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in San Francisco, CA
 

I love giving folks tools right away to work with their overactive minds. When we start to pay attention to the ways we distort our thinking, and alternative ways of perceiving, it gives us more choice in how we proceed.

— Noa Hamiel, Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

This was one of the first approaches I learned as a therapist in training. With CBT I help people start to change their harmful thoughts to more helpful ones.

— Emily Derouin, Psychologist in Denver, CO
 

With Cognitive Behavioral Therapy approaches, I help clients identify the thoughts, emotions, and behaviors that may be contributing to their symptoms and distress. By focusing on their unique background/experiences, I help clients make meaning of their experiences so they can reduce distress and build more meaningful relationships and interactions. *For individuals from oppressed group(s), this includes acknowledging the ongoing impact of current and/or historical oppression.

— Shelly Crosby, Psychologist in Long Beach, CA

Our thoughts, feelings, and actions are linked in ways we often don't completely understand. By improving our self awareness of the particular moments when we thought, felt, or acted in an unhealthy way, we can choose a better, healthier way to think, feel, and behave.

— David Johnson, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Mateo, CA
 

CBT teaches us about the connection between our thoughts, feelings and behaviors that follows an activating event. My goal is to bring awareness to how you as the client are able to identify, challenge and replace those irrational thoughts with more rational ones to provide you the freedom of being yourself, and validating your own feelings.

— Lauretta Akpoyoware, Licensed Professional Counselor

What you think as you go through your day affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

At the core of CBT therapy is the idea that thoughts, feelings, and behavior are interrelated and making changes in one area can affect the other areas. I frequently use CBT interventions (along with DBT and ACT) to build self-awareness, identify opportunities for change, and support you in developing more helpful and effective coping skills.

— Jeanine Moreland, Clinical Psychologist in Chicago, IL

I authored Reason, the Moment and Recovery, a workbook combining Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) with Mindfulness.

— Bruce Burleson, Addictions Counselor in Norwell, MA
 

I have completed more than 25 hours of continuing education training in CBT, and I have used CBT most extensively in treatment of individuals as young as age 7 and as old as 72.

— Lisa Ritter, Counselor in Beaverton, OR

CBT is based on several core principles: Psychological problems are based, in part, on faulty or unhelpful ways of thinking. Psychological problems are based, in part, on learned patterns of unhelpful behavior. People suffering from psychological problems can learn better ways of coping with them, thereby relieving their symptoms and becoming more effective in their lives. CBT treatment usually involves efforts to change thinking patterns.

— Eryn Hicker, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

CBT is something that I learned a lot about in my graduate program and throughout my career. It comes very naturally to me and for my clients it seems to provide concrete tools to help them work through various issues that bring them to treatment. I use this approach every day I am with clients and have attended CBT university at Rogers Behavioral Health Hospital for further training.

— Abigail Lynch, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Chicago, IL

CBT is the most common treatment for anxiety, depression, and other mental health challenges. Within the world of CBT the domains of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. CBT believes that if you change your thoughts you change your life because of these interrelated domains within the human experience. CBT pairs well with mindfulness, homework, and existential therapy.

— Dr. Thomas Lucking, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Gatos, CA
 

What you think as you go through your day affects how you feel. When you feel better, you act better. The way you behave contributes to how you feel. CBT is empowering. We'll look at the interaction of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When we examine your Core Beliefs- about yourself, your life, and your future, you will gain the power to change how you think about every situation you are in, and you can think, feel, and act more effectively.

— Kathryn Gates, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

I believe that cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective and easy to learn and implement approach that can bring about tremendous change for the client. I have seen that CBT paired with compassion and person centered approaches can be effective for self esteem, codependency, depression and anxiety.

— Dakota Westlake, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Redlands, CA
 

This is a more structure approach versus those mention prior. This is focused on exploring how your thought pattern is contributing to your distress. By identifying the situation/event(which may not be apparent) while also increasing awareness of thoughts, emotional response, and cognitive errors. Homework and/or action plans are a component of CBT in order to help you make gradual progress to resolve distress.

— Silvia Torres, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Garden City, NY