Humanistic Therapy

Humanistic therapy, also known as humanism, is a therapeutic approach that combines mindfulness and behavioral therapy, with positive social support. Humanistic therapy is grounded in the belief that people are innately good. The focus is on the individual client’s experience, with humanistic therapists believing that that approach is more beneficial and informative than a focus on groups of individuals with similar characteristics. Emphasis is given to creativity, free will, and human potential, with a focus on a person’s positive traits and their ability to use their personal instincts to find wisdom, growth, healing, and fulfillment within themselves. This type of therapy encourages a self-awareness and mindfulness that helps the client change their state of mind and behavior from one set of reactions to a healthier one with more productive and thoughtful actions. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s humanistic therapy experts.

Meet the specialists

Carl Rogers taught us to value the client, not to look down on them like idiots who do not know what is going on in their own life. Therapists should collaborate with the client with sincere respect. One of the chief cornerstones is genuineness with the client. A sincere relationship, not just a simple paid cold-hearted client.

— Monte Miller, Psychologist in Austin, TX
 

Therapy focuses on the whole person and not just what has occurred. I work collaboratively and look at the client through holistically and how they are coping; emotionally, physically, socially and spiritually.

— Michelle North, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encinitas, CA

"Emphasis is given to creativity, free will, and human potential, with a focus on a person’s positive traits and their ability to use their personal instincts to find wisdom, growth, healing, and fulfillment within themselves. [Humanistic]... therapy encourages a self-awareness and mindfulness that helps the client change their state of mind and behavior from one set of reactions to a healthier one with more productive and thoughtful actions." From Therapy Den

— Andy Dishman, Licensed Professional Counselor in MARIETTA, GA
 

AKA Rogerian therapy; Rogers believed similarly to Maslow, but also believed that the pathway to this actualization is a fertile environment where unconditional positive regard and transparency are present in the room. I am a natural cheerleader of people.

— Gregory Gooden, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in POMONA, CA

In my 20 years of therapy experience, I have learned the most important factor in therapy being successful is the relationship between the client and therapist. If the client does not feel comfortable and safe, therapy will not progress. The humanistic approach focuses on the therapeutic relationship to help create change. This approach helps people regardless of their age, race, sexual orientation, religion, etc.

— Julie Klamon, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Agoura Hills, CA
 

Humanistic Therapy takes a whole person approach to healing and self growth; looking an individuals social, physical, emotional and spiritual well-being.

— Michelle North, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encinitas, CA

Humanistic Therapy has a strong basis in self-acceptance and the potential of the therapeutic relationship to support this process. This approach seeks to build greater congruence between our inner feelings and their outer expression. "Unconditional Positive Regard" by the therapist for their client is a hallmark of this approach.

— Paul Chilkov, Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

Humanistic Therapy has a strong basis in self-acceptance and the potential of the therapeutic relationship to support this process. This approach seeks to build greater congruence between inner feelings and their outer expression. "Unconditional Positive Regard" by the therapist for their client is a hallmark of this approach.

— Paul Chilkov, Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA

As a person-centered therapist I approach my work with clients by fostering a therapeutic enviornment. By providing clients with unconditional positive regard, emotional congruence, and empathy, the space for change is created. Working with clients in a collaborative manner I strive to help them develop congruence that better fits their own personal narrative.

— Dan Schmitt, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Eugene, OR
 

My Master's Degree is from a psychology program that specialized in Humanistic Therapy.

— Leticia Berg, Psychotherapist in Ann Arbor, MI

We believe the relationship between clinician and client is the groundwork that leads to effective therapy. Creating a solid connection and mutual respect allows deep work to occur in the therapy room.

— Sprout Therapy PDX, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Humanistic Therapy has a strong basis in self-acceptance and the potential of the therapeutic relationship to support this process. This approach seeks to build greater congruence between our inner feelings and their outer expression. "Unconditional Positive Regard" by the therapist for their client is a hallmark of this approach.

— Paul Chilkov, Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA

My humanistic values show through in my work with people. These values include my beliefs that each person has value, dignity, and worth. These beliefs help me to be warm, empathic, and non-judgmental.

— Amber Holt, Clinical Social Worker in Gig Harbor, WA
 

Emphasizes the importance of being your true self in the effort to live your best life.

— Patricia L Sellers, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Claremont, CA

In congruence with CBT and Contemplative Therapy, Humanistic Therapy allows further exploration of our true self. Utilizing the strengths that we hold, emboldens the areas that are not as strong. I work to help empower individuals, couples and families, to identify their own unique view of the world and integrate that view in a productive manner.

— MICHAEL ROSE, Licensed Professional Counselor in ,
 

We are all connected through our shared experience of being human. Getting to know ourselves is one of the most empowering and healing things we can do. I fully believe that being seen, heard, and witnessed nonjudgmentally by another human is one of the most healing experiences we can have.

— Lindsay Anderson, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

I will always remain firm in my belief that my clients are the experts in their lives and have the potential to reach their goals. I work from a perspective that fuels empowerment and radical self love.

— Elyssa Helfer, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
 

I am an expert in humanistic therapy because my experience has taught me that a therapist is never the expert on your problem or situation, you are. Humanistic therapy supports this and states that you and I together can work to come up with resources that you feel are going to be helpful for you and that you have the power to heal yourself and become whole. You are not your diagnosis- there is much more to you than that, and you are in charge of how you change.

— Sydney Koenig, Counselor in Lone Tree, CO

We are all connected through our shared experience of being human. Getting to know ourselves is one of the most empowering and healing things we can do. I fully believe that being seen, heard, and witnessed nonjudgmentally by another human is one of the most healing experiences we can have.

— Lindsay Anderson, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR