Humanistic Therapy

Humanistic therapy, also known as humanism, is a therapeutic approach that combines mindfulness and behavioral therapy, with positive social support. Humanistic therapy is grounded in the belief that people are innately good. The focus is on the individual client’s experience, with humanistic therapists believing that that approach is more beneficial and informative than a focus on groups of individuals with similar characteristics. Emphasis is given to creativity, free will, and human potential, with a focus on a person’s positive traits and their ability to use their personal instincts to find wisdom, growth, healing, and fulfillment within themselves. This type of therapy encourages a self-awareness and mindfulness that helps the client change their state of mind and behavior from one set of reactions to a healthier one with more productive and thoughtful actions. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s humanistic therapy experts.

Meet the specialists

"Whatever your story, you no longer need to be alone with it. This is what will allow your healing to begin."~ Carl Rogers. Rogers believed that the therapeutic relationship was at the forefront of the healing process. As a Person-Centered therapist, I take the time to build that therapeutic trust, so that you can feel comfortable, safe and supported. The direction of therapy is your choice as i am here to support you and walk alongside you on this journey to growth and healing.

— Amy Galaviz, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR
 

Humanism is a therapeutic perspective which emphasizes unconditional positive regard for other living beings. It is based on the assumption that empathy and acceptance are integral parts of the healing process. Through this orientation the client is regarded with warmth and empathy. Once this dynamic is established, deeper and more profound healing is

— Sarah Glidden, Counselor in Portland, OR

The most important factor for people achieving their goals in therapy is client-therapist match. I embrace Humanistic Therapy's tenets of empathy and honesty. The therapist is not the "expert" in the client's life, rather, the client has all the power within them to change. The job of the therapist is to act as a compassionate coach, challenging the client, and at the same time being real and authentic.

— Michael Ceely, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA
 

I am a Certified Daring Way™ Facilitator; this helps me support my clients around topics such as vulnerability, courage, shame, and worthiness. The work invites people to examine the thoughts, emotions, and behaviors that are holding them back and identify the new choices and practices that will move them toward more authentic and wholehearted living. The primary focus is on developing shame resilience skills and developing daily practices that transform the way we live, love, parent, and lead.

— Amy Emery, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Southington, CT

"Whatever your story, you no longer need to be alone with it. This is what will allow your healing to begin."~ Carl Rogers. Rogers believed that the therapeutic relationship was at the forefront of the healing process. As a Person-Centered therapist, I take the time to build that therapeutic trust, so that you can feel comfortable, safe and supported. The direction of therapy is your choice as i am here to support you and walk alongside you on this journey.

— Amy Galaviz, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

Using Humanistic therapy, I don't just treat your symptoms. I view you as entire person with thoughts, feelings, experiences, social connections, spirituality, sexuality, etc. Often, the problems we regularly face are not isolated to just one area of our life. We are complex beings and the issues we face are too.

— Kyle Stepler, Counselor in Greenwood, IN
 

"Whatever your story, you no longer need to be alone with it. This is what will allow your healing to begin."~ Carl Rogers. Rogers believed that the therapeutic relationship was at the forefront of the healing process. As a Person-Centered therapist, I take the time to build that therapeutic trust, so that you can feel comfortable, safe and supported. The direction of therapy is your choice as i am here to support you and walk alongside you on this journey to growth and healing.

— Amy Galaviz, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

Everyone deserves to have someone in this world that will show them unconditional positive regard and accept them for who and where they are.

— Willard Vaughn, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA
 

I deeply respect Humanistic Psychology's view of therapy as the process of a therapist honoring and seeking to deeply and accurately understand the subjective experience of her client. The focus is on acceptance, humility, nonjudgement, and a belief that people are fundamentally good and able to help themselves with the right conditions and support. As your therapist, my goal is to extend these qualities to you so you feel respected, supported, empowered, and not pathologized. Humanistic therapy assumes that all people strive for health and thriving (self-actualization), and that all of our behaviors, even those that appear misguided or create other problems, are in service of this goal. Sometimes we need help discovering healthier or more effective ways to self actualize, and that's where therapy comes in.

— Maysie Tift, LMFT, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Rafael, CA

Carl Rogers taught us to value the client, not to look down on them like idiots who do not know what is going on in their own life. Therapists should collaborate with the client with sincere respect. One of the chief cornerstones is genuineness with the client. A sincere relationship, not just a simple paid cold-hearted client.

— Monte Miller, Psychologist in Boerne, TX

I meet you where you are, reflecting your needs to support your empowerment toward problem solving.

— Lisa SLOAN STROM, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I believe in unconditional positive regard and that the client deserves to feel understood and accepted.

— Jenny Larson, Counselor in Portland, OR

Humanistic psychology is grounded in the belief that people are innately good. It holds that morality, ethical values, and good intentions are the driving forces of behavior. Humanism suggests that a person is created with a distinct priority of needs and drives and that each person must rely on a personal sense of inner wisdom and healing. I use this method of therapy, taking a non-pathological approach, targeting productive, adaptive, and beneficial traits and behaviors of an individual.

— Colleen Burke-Sivers, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

My baseline view of therapy is humanistic, specifically Rogerian, therapy. I am in the room with you as another human being, a guide, who is approaching therapy with geniuneness, empathy, and unconditional positive regard. I am here to help you find the answers that you need to uncover within yourself. You are the expert on your life. I am here to listen and to point out the patterns and possibilities you may be overlooking, and to provide a few other handy tools I've learned along the way.

— Kelley O'Hanlon, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Redmond, WA
 

Humanism is a therapeutic perspective which emphasizes unconditional positive regard for other living beings. It is based on the assumption that empathy and acceptance are integral parts of the healing process. Through this orientation the client is regarded with warmth and empathy. Once this dynamic is established, deeper and more profound healing organically occurs.

— Sarah Glidden, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Humanism is a perspective which emphasizes unconditional positive regard for

— Sarah Glidden, Counselor in Portland, OR

Humanistic therapy describes my overall approach to therapy in that my relationship with clients is a collaborative one. I believe that acceptance and empathy are essential to the therapeutic relationship and that therapy goals should be directed by clients.

— Megan Miller, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in North Bend, OR