Humanistic Therapy

Humanistic therapy, also known as humanism, is a therapeutic approach that combines mindfulness and behavioral therapy, with positive social support. Humanistic therapy is grounded in the belief that people are innately good. The focus is on the individual client’s experience, with humanistic therapists believing that that approach is more beneficial and informative than a focus on groups of individuals with similar characteristics. Emphasis is given to creativity, free will, and human potential, with a focus on a person’s positive traits and their ability to use their personal instincts to find wisdom, growth, healing, and fulfillment within themselves. This type of therapy encourages a self-awareness and mindfulness that helps the client change their state of mind and behavior from one set of reactions to a healthier one with more productive and thoughtful actions. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s humanistic therapy experts.

Meet the specialists

Everyone deserves to have someone in this world that will show them unconditional positive regard and accept them for who and where they are.

— Willard Vaughn, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA
 

Providing a supportive and accepting environment for growth and personal exploration in therapy.

— Carolyn Mehlomakulu, Art Therapist in Austin, TX
 

This overlaps with Rogerian.

— Moira Ryan, Counselor in Portland, OR

I co-created a theory called Compassion Based Awareness Therapy. This theory is rooted in Humanistic, Attachment and Zen. The focus is in bringing awareness to your internal dynamics and how these get played out in relationships. We look through the lens of compassion because people CANNOT learn when they are afraid. No shame. No blame. Compassionate accountability.

— Laura Carr, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA
 

This was the very first and most important theory I learned in my master's program when studying social work. This modality allows the person to live their most honest versions of themselves to increasing self awareness and promoting self efficacy. It creates an empathetic and supportive environment. I walk alongside you in this type of therapy and meet you where you're at to address your individualized needs. We each have our own gifts we share with the world and this type of work honors that!

— Molly Zive, Psychotherapist in San Diego, CA
 

I like to meet my clients where they are in life. I do not put pressure on them to “do the work” right away. I like them to get to know me first. As you develop a relationship with me, you’ll feel safe to open up about what brought you into therapy. I believe a humanistic approach allows me to do this. I provide a safe and welcoming space needed to “Do the work.” Let’s plant the foundation to feed the seed I’ll provide you.

— Denise Brady, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Signal Hill, CA

"Whatever your story, you no longer need to be alone with it. This is what will allow your healing to begin."~ Carl Rogers. Rogers believed that the therapeutic relationship was at the forefront of the healing process. As a Person-Centered therapist, I take the time to build that therapeutic trust, so that you can feel comfortable, safe and supported. The direction of therapy is your choice as i am here to support you and walk alongside you on this journey to growth and healing.

— Amy Galaviz, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

The most important factor for people achieving their goals in therapy is client-therapist match. I embrace Humanistic Therapy's tenets of empathy and honesty. The therapist is not the "expert" in the client's life, rather, the client has all the power within them to change. The job of the therapist is to act as a compassionate coach, challenging the client, and at the same time being real and authentic.

— Michael Ceely, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA
 

Humanistic psychology is grounded in the belief that people are innately good. It holds that morality, ethical values, and good intentions are the driving forces of behavior. Humanism suggests that a person is created with a distinct priority of needs and drives and that each person must rely on a personal sense of inner wisdom and healing. I use this method of therapy, taking a non-pathological approach, targeting productive, adaptive, and beneficial traits and behaviors of an individual.

— Colleen Burke-Sivers, Counselor in Portland, OR

I invite you to share all the deepest parts of yourself with me without judgment. In the words of Carl Rogers, "the curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change."

— Kristen Martinez, Counselor in Seattle, WA

Client centered humanistic psychology supports healing & growth by building on strengths, exploring meaning, creating resilience, developing talents, grounding in responsibility, & supporting self-determination & actualization. This is a holistic (mind, body, spirit, individual, family, society) approach. Enhanced creativity is key to successful life transitions, transforming relationships, and contributing to society.

— Denita Benyshek, Counselor in Mercer Island, WA
 

"Whatever your story, you no longer need to be alone with it. This is what will allow your healing to begin."~ Carl Rogers. Rogers believed that the therapeutic relationship was at the forefront of the healing process. As a Person-Centered therapist, I take the time to

— Amy Galaviz, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

Humanistic oriented therapies are considered to be my theoretical home. I have trained in person-centered and phenomenological approaches to therapy for over 15 years and find it to be a tremendously helpful and effective approach to counseling. The research evidence overwhelmingly points to the fundamental tenets of humanistic therapy as being the most effective healing aspects of therapy.

— Daniel Parker, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist in Portland, OR
 

I have always had an interest in mindfulness and a belief that self awareness is the key to development. I like dissecting parts of clients lives with them and then putting them back together in one cohesive, fluid and greater sum.

— Carrissa Michael, Licensed Professional Counselor in Shelby Township, MI

It is important to me that you feel comfortable being your authentic self during therapy. I practice client-centered therapy which in part means that I work to provide a nonjudgmental space where you feel that you can express yourself freely and without fear of judgment. If you have ever felt misunderstood or unheard, I am here to help change that. My job as a therapist is to support you on your journey and help you draw out the answers that lie within you.

— Lisa Headings, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

We are all connected through our shared experience of being human. Getting to know ourselves is one of the most empowering and healing things we can do. I fully believe that being seen, heard, and witnessed nonjudgmentally by another human is one of the most healing experiences we can have.

— Lindsay Anderson, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

Humanistic Therapy is based on the belief that being your true self helps you live your most fulfilling life. In that way, we often use speciality tailored, eclectic approaches to help you understand your challenges. This type of therapy honors the individual and their experience, often taking strengths based outlooks on how you can tackle any situation towards healthier growth.

— Virtual Counselor, Counselor in Easton, PA
 

Carl Rogers taught us to value the client, not to look down on them like idiots who do not know what is going on in their own life. Therapists should collaborate with the client with sincere respect. One of the chief cornerstones is genuineness with the client. A sincere relationship, not just a simple paid cold-hearted client.

— Monte Miller, Psychologist in San Antonio, TX

I take a person-centered approach, which means I hold your values in the highest regard and provide acceptance and a safe space. The therapeutic relationship we build is one of the greatest gifts and tools to helping you find your footing again.

— Lisa Hedden, Associate Professional Counselor in Tucker, GA
 

Humanistic psychology is a psychological perspective that emphasizes the study of the whole person. I believe it is important to look at what behavior is happening and why it may be done. I believe that using Humanistic Therapy we can go deep in the inner feelings and self-image of the person seeking therapy.

— Erin Gray, Counselor in Lake Mary, FL

This therapy focuses on empathy and positives in behavior while guiding the client to examine life values, self-worth and their unique place in the world. Methods are explored for building self-confidence, self-compassion and self-esteem .

— James Kingman, Licensed Professional Counselor in Atlanta, GA
 

"Emphasis is given to creativity, free will, and human potential, with a focus on a person’s positive traits and their ability to use their personal instincts to find wisdom, growth, healing, and fulfillment within themselves. [Humanistic]... therapy encourages a self-awareness and mindfulness that helps the client change their state of mind and behavior from one set of reactions to a healthier one with more productive and thoughtful actions." From Therapy Den

— Andy Dishman, Licensed Professional Counselor in MARIETTA, GA

The relationship between the client and the therapist is the biggest predictor of success regardless of the type of modality or training the therapist has. Meeting you where you're at is one of the most powerful things I can do as your therapist.

— Logan Druckman, Licensed Professional Counselor in Broomfield, CO
 

As a Humanistic Therapist, I believe people have the ability to realize their potential and achieve their goals. I believe that a warm, compassionate, and encouraging environment will foster a person's self-esteem. When self-esteem is present a person will be able to tune with their needs, wants, and desires. Clients will heal as I will guide them through the process of discussing difficult topics under care and attention.

— Heather Lam, Counselor in Pasadena, CA