Humanistic Therapy

Humanistic therapy, also known as humanism, is a therapeutic approach that combines mindfulness and behavioral therapy, with positive social support. Humanistic therapy is grounded in the belief that people are innately good. The focus is on the individual client’s experience, with humanistic therapists believing that that approach is more beneficial and informative than a focus on groups of individuals with similar characteristics. Emphasis is given to creativity, free will, and human potential, with a focus on a person’s positive traits and their ability to use their personal instincts to find wisdom, growth, healing, and fulfillment within themselves. This type of therapy encourages a self-awareness and mindfulness that helps the client change their state of mind and behavior from one set of reactions to a healthier one with more productive and thoughtful actions. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s humanistic therapy experts.

Meet the specialists

Who is the expert on your life? You are. Research has shown that just having a safe space to vent and express our true feelings can relieve depression and increase self-esteem. Humanistic therapy is more than just 'talk therapy'-- it is about helping you to discover your genuine thoughts, feelings, and identity. That's why my first priority is to create a trusting relationship between us.

— Lilyan Moore, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Related to my interest in Feminist Therapy, I also use Humanistic approaches in my work. By this, I mean that in our work together, we will consider all parts of you and help you to realize your full potential in life. I believe that we are each greater than the sum of our parts and that we are better people and more engaged in our lives and our communities when we have greater understanding of ourselves and others.

— Marla Cass, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

"Whatever your story, you no longer need to be alone with it. This is what will allow your healing to begin."~ Carl Rogers. Rogers believed that the therapeutic relationship was at the forefront of the healing process. As a Person-Centered therapist, I take the time to build that therapeutic trust, so that you can feel comfortable, safe and supported. The direction of therapy is your choice as i am here to support you and walk alongside you on this journey to growth and healing.

— Amy Galaviz, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR
 

I approach every session with a Humanistic Therapeutic approach. I believe my clients are good and have the power to make their own decisions. I also believe that humans have certain needs that need to be met and that each person has a golden opportunity to take responsibility for meeting those needs.

— Brandi Jackson, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in ,

Carl Rogers taught us to value the client, not to look down on them like idiots who do not know what is going on in their own life. Therapists should collaborate with the client with sincere respect. One of the chief cornerstones is genuineness with the client. A sincere relationship, not just a simple paid cold-hearted client.

— Monte Miller, Psychologist in Boerne, TX
 

"Whatever your story, you no longer need to be alone with it. This is what will allow your healing to begin."~ Carl Rogers. Rogers believed that the therapeutic relationship was at the forefront of the healing process. As a Person-Centered therapist, I take the time to

— Amy Galaviz, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

"Whatever your story, you no longer need to be alone with it. This is what will allow your healing to begin."~ Carl Rogers. Rogers believed that the therapeutic relationship was at the forefront of the healing process. As a Person-Centered therapist, I take the time to build that therapeutic trust, so that you can feel comfortable, safe and supported. The direction of therapy is your choice as i am here to support you and walk alongside you on this journey.

— Amy Galaviz, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR
 

I am a Certified Daring Way™ Facilitator; this helps me support my clients around topics such as vulnerability, courage, shame, and worthiness. The work invites people to examine the thoughts, emotions, and behaviors that are holding them back and identify the new choices and practices that will move them toward more authentic and wholehearted living. The primary focus is on developing shame resilience skills and developing daily practices that transform the way we live, love, parent, and lead.

— Amy Emery (*current Monday morning availability only), Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Southington, CT

Client centered humanistic psychology supports healing & growth by building on strengths, exploring meaning, creating resilience, developing talents, grounding in responsibility, & supporting self-determination & actualization. This is a holistic (mind, body, spirit, individual, family, society) approach. Enhanced creativity is key to successful life transitions, transforming relationships, and contributing to society.

— Denita Benyshek, Counselor in Mercer Island, WA
 

This therapy focuses on empathy and positives in behavior while guiding the client to examine life values, self-worth and their unique place in the world. Methods are explored for building self-confidence, self-compassion and self-esteem .

— James Kingman, Licensed Professional Counselor in Atlanta, GA

Humanistic oriented therapies are considered to be my theoretical home. I have trained in person-centered and phenomenological approaches to therapy for over 15 years and find it to be a tremendously helpful and effective approach to counseling. The research evidence overwhelmingly points to the fundamental tenets of humanistic therapy as being the most effective healing aspects of therapy.

— Daniel Parker, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist in Portland, OR
 

I will work with you so you can overcome your struggles, become fully aware of all your portentials, be the person that is authentic to you, and make decisions that feel right for you.

— Beatrice Schreiber, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA

I believe that you are the expert on your own experience - while you may not know all the answers, you hold the wisdom to create your most vibrant life. My focus is on walking with you, and guiding you when necessary, on your individual and unique path. I provide tools and help you learn skills along the way, guided by your needs, strengths, and goals.

— Katrina Knizek, Counselor in Spokane, WA

Focusing on your strengths to help you realize your full potential.

— Cynthia Goeller, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in ,

While I use many different techniques, I consider my work grounded in Humanistic principals. That means that I strongly believe that all people are capable of growth and change and therapy can enhance and accelerate the process. I work as a partner to my clients on their journey, not someone to tell them what they "should" do. I will give you honest feedback in a respectful and caring manner and we will work together to problem-solve and help you move towards your goals.

— Jody Kircher, Clinical Psychologist in Coeur d'Alene, ID
 

Client-centered outcomes research tells us that no specific orientation is magic; the most important factor in change is our relationship. That being said, having a common language can go a long way. I have always been drawn to Reality Therapy as it normalizes universal human needs and, in a non-judgmental way, accepts that we are all doing our best to get our needs met at any given point. Yet sometimes we need to try new things and this approach is a valuable tool for exploration.

— Matthew Malouf, Psychologist in Baltimore, MD

Humanistic psychology is grounded in the belief that people are innately good. It holds that morality, ethical values, and good intentions are the driving forces of behavior. Humanism suggests that a person is created with a distinct priority of needs and drives and that each person must rely on a personal sense of inner wisdom and healing. I use this method of therapy, taking a non-pathological approach, targeting productive, adaptive, and beneficial traits and behaviors of an individual.

— Colleen Burke-Sivers, Counselor in Portland, OR

The most important factor for people achieving their goals in therapy is client-therapist match. I embrace Humanistic Therapy's tenets of empathy and honesty. The therapist is not the "expert" in the client's life, rather, the client has all the power within them to change. The job of the therapist is to act as a compassionate coach, challenging the client, and at the same time being real and authentic.

— Michael Ceely, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

Trained in Sex Therapy, Kink-Informed, Open and Poly relationships

— Heather McPherson, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

Everyone deserves to have someone in this world that will show them unconditional positive regard and accept them for who and where they are.

— Willard Vaughn, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA

Humanism is a therapeutic perspective which emphasizes unconditional positive regard for other living beings. It is based on the assumption that empathy and acceptance are integral parts of the healing process. Through this orientation the client is regarded with warmth and empathy. Once this dynamic is established, deeper and more profound healing organically occurs.

— Sarah Glidden, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

“The good life is a process, not a state of being. It is a direction not a destination.”- Carl Rogers I am here to walk with you on this destination, to support you, provide you with navigation and tools. To be a witness, a guide and a cheerleader.

— Margaret Bell, Counselor in Denver, CO