Humanistic Therapy

Humanistic therapy, also known as humanism, is a therapeutic approach that combines mindfulness and behavioral therapy, with positive social support. Humanistic therapy is grounded in the belief that people are innately good. The focus is on the individual client’s experience, with humanistic therapists believing that that approach is more beneficial and informative than a focus on groups of individuals with similar characteristics. Emphasis is given to creativity, free will, and human potential, with a focus on a person’s positive traits and their ability to use their personal instincts to find wisdom, growth, healing, and fulfillment within themselves. This type of therapy encourages a self-awareness and mindfulness that helps the client change their state of mind and behavior from one set of reactions to a healthier one with more productive and thoughtful actions. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s humanistic therapy experts.

Meet the specialists

We believe the relationship between clinician and client is the groundwork that leads to effective therapy. Creating a solid connection and mutual respect allows deep work to occur in the therapy room.

— Sprout Therapy PDX, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

"Emphasis is given to creativity, free will, and human potential, with a focus on a person’s positive traits and their ability to use their personal instincts to find wisdom, growth, healing, and fulfillment within themselves. [Humanistic]... therapy encourages a self-awareness and mindfulness that helps the client change their state of mind and behavior from one set of reactions to a healthier one with more productive and thoughtful actions." From Therapy Den

— Andy Dishman, Licensed Professional Counselor in MARIETTA, GA

Humanistic psychology (humanism) is grounded in the belief that people are innately good. This type of psychology holds that morality, ethical values, and good intentions are the driving forces of behavior, while adverse social or psychological experiences can be attributed to deviations from natural tendencies. Self actualization is the key here. With all three of my orientations, my goal is that we work together, and I see you as a human, and someone who shares common goals, aspirations, and desires that a majority of us have. By viewing the 'whole' you and how you relate to your world, I gain a clear understanding and capacity to work with you to create a safe space to do the work together. I am right there with you every step of the way.

— Adrian Scharfetter, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in SACRAMENTO, CA
 

The most important factor for people achieving their goals in therapy is client-therapist match. I embrace Humanistic Therapy's tenets of empathy and honesty. The therapist is not the "expert" in the client's life, rather, the client has all the power within them to change. The job of the therapist is to act as a compassionate coach, challenging the client, and at the same time being real and authentic.

— Michael Ceely, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

Carl Rogers taught us to value the client, not to look down on them like idiots who do not know what is going on in their own life. Therapists should collaborate with the client with sincere respect. One of the chief cornerstones is genuineness with the client. A sincere relationship, not just a simple paid cold-hearted client.

— Monte Miller, Psychologist in San Antonio, TX
 

Traditionally, therapy has focused on pathology (what is wrong), and while I agree it is important to identify and rectify issues that cause pain and disruption, I also strongly believe that therapy can and should focus on strengths, meaning, purpose, and how to live life to the fullest. People are inherently good and tapping into these positive traits will provide you with the wisdom to make the best choice for your life.

— Crystal Clark, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA

We are all connected through our shared experience of being human. Getting to know ourselves is one of the most empowering and healing things we can do. I fully believe that being seen, heard, and witnessed nonjudgmentally by another human is one of the most healing experiences we can have.

— Lindsay Anderson, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR
 

As a person-centered therapist I approach my work with clients by fostering a therapeutic enviornment. By providing clients with unconditional positive regard, emotional congruence, and empathy, the space for change is created. Working with clients in a collaborative manner I strive to help them develop congruence that better fits their own personal narrative.

— Dan Schmitt, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Eugene, OR

AKA Rogerian therapy; Rogers believed similarly to Maslow, but also believed that the pathway to this actualization is a fertile environment where unconditional positive regard and transparency are present in the room. I am a natural cheerleader of people.

— Gregory Gooden, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in POMONA, CA
 

I will work with you so you can overcome your struggles, become fully aware of all your portentials, be the person that is authentic to you, and make decisions that feel right for you.

— Beatrice Schreiber, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Humanistic Therapy takes a whole person approach to healing and self growth; looking an individuals social, physical, emotional and spiritual well-being.

— Michelle North, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encinitas, CA
 

I will always remain firm in my belief that my clients are the experts in their lives and have the potential to reach their goals. I work from a perspective that fuels empowerment and radical self love.

— Elyssa Helfer, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist

If you're human, chances are you have experienced some sort of angst. I see the humanistic and person-centered approaches as two sides of the same coin. As a secular humanist, my values closely align with this methodology in that I love helping my clients realize that they have everything they need to cope with reality. People often just need to be shown how to rediscover their strengths and remnded that it's ok to not be ok.

— Kayce Hodos, Counselor in Wake Forest, NC
 

I am passionate about working with my clients to enhance the quality of their lives. As a counselor, I believe we can address your self-limiting beliefs and work on building a self-concept that supports your growth. Your journey back into yourself doesn't have to be one you make alone. Let’s honor your mind, body, and spirit by practicing healing that engages your intuition and allows you to enter a new space of knowing.

— Olivia Clear, Counselor in Oakland, CA

Also known as humanism, humanistic therapy is a positive approach to psychotherapy that focuses on a person’s individual nature, rather than categorizing groups of people with similar characteristics as having the same problems. Humanistic therapy looks at the whole person, not only from the therapist’s view but from the viewpoint of individuals observing their own behavior. The emphasis is on a person’s positive traits and behaviors, and the ability to use their personal instincts to find wisdo

— Toby Williams, Creative Art Therapist in Brooklyn, NY
 

I am a Certified Daring Way™ Facilitator; this helps me support my clients around topics such as vulnerability, courage, shame, and worthiness. The work invites people to examine the thoughts, emotions, and behaviors that are holding them back and identify the new choices and practices that will move them toward more authentic and wholehearted living. The primary focus is on developing shame resilience skills and developing daily practices that transform the way we live, love, parent, and lead.

— Amy Emery, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in , CT

Therapy focuses on the whole person and not just what has occurred. I work collaboratively and look at the client through holistically and how they are coping; emotionally, physically, socially and spiritually.

— Michelle North, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encinitas, CA
 

My schooling focused around the innate strengths we all have as humans. I believe in the capacity of humans to use their intrinsic abilities to successfully navigate through their live to create a life worth living. We all can live up to our full potentials.

— Jessica Butler, Associate Professional Clinical Counselor in Denver, CO