Family Conflict

Experiencing occasional conflict is very common, even in the closest of families. Sources of everyday conflict are typically things like miscommunication or misunderstandings. Serious, long-term conflicts can arise from things like substance abuse, financial problems, marital problems, a birth, a job change, or a big move. Whether the source of a families discord is major or minor, ongoing conflict can cause a lot of stress. Allowing conflict to linger and fester can cause lasting damage to familial relationships. If you and your family are experiencing ongoing conflicts, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s family conflict experts today.

Meet the specialists

Family conflicts could mean many different things, but they reflect not only present challenges but a history of miscommunication, lack of understanding and validation, trauma, dependency, codependency, etc.

— Antonieta Contreras, Therapist in NEW YORK, NY
 

I was trained in Strategic Family Therapy. I work well with families who fight/argue a lot due to value/cultural conflicts. I also enjoy working with queer teens in the family system.

— Michelle Chia Ning Chang, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Emeryville, CA

Family conflict is one of the most common reasons people enter therapy. Yet, it can be extremely hard to resolve these issues when you have multiple people in a therapy sessions with their own unique feelings, perspectives, and experiences. With my training and experience, I am competent in helping families to resolve conflict, increase communication, and express their feelings in a healthy way.

— Lilyan Moore, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Can't wait till your child is 18 so you can send them packing? Or maybe you dread the day you become an empty nester. Never thought your child would struggle with what they are? Slowly but surely we'll help you navigate the storm surrounding you.

— Dustin Hodgkin, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Olympia, WA

It is getting harder and harder for families these days. The world seems to be spinning everyone apart. The solid foundation is crumbling away. In my Family Therapy sessions, I work closely with parents to create structure, routines, traditions, and rituals that support a healthy family culture and identity. Goals focus on creating positive, connecting experiences for families. So often, families do not know how to take the time to prioritize activities and events that build family cohesion. I give parents and families tools to improve communication, resolve conflicts, solve problems and build trust. Families learn to strengthen attachments and bonding so that children feel secure and confident as they venture out into the world and launch into healthy adult lives.

— S. Abigail McCarrel, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Arcadia, CA
 

Family conflict is one of the most common reasons people enter therapy. Yet, it can be extremely hard to resolve these issues when you have multiple people in a therapy sessions with their own unique feelings, perspectives, and experiences. With my training and experience, I am competent in helping families to resolve conflict, increase communication, and express their feelings in a healthy way.

— Lilyan Moore, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I work with parents who may be having difficulties with parenting issues or trying to stay connected to each other while parenting, working and keeping the household afloat. How does a couple create healthy boundaries regarding children, in-laws and their own extended family so their own relationship remains a priority.

— Anthony Gambuzza, Psychologist in Stamford, CT

We will look at ways you view yourself in your family system, explore your goals and address pressing issues so you can move forward and start creating a happier you. Relational conflicts can be damaging and deeply rooted, but you have the power to shift the dynamics. Don't wait for others around you to change, you are enough to make a difference!

— Judit Colbert, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Rafael, CA

I help families find ways to communicate more effectively.

— Lizzette Vescera, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Long Beach, CA
 

When a couple is experiencing a divorce, other members of the family are affected. Divorce is a transitional period for all family members involved, especially children. Divorce necessitates a reorganization of the family regarding proximity (both physical and emotional), boundaries, roles, expectations and rules. It can be helpful to have intentional conversations about these changes as a family to promote emotional health, adjustment, and healing.

— Arielle Fettman, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Portland, OR

I am an expert in healing family relations. I have a lineage trauma based view and understand family dynamics.

— Jack Blackwell, Therapist in Boulder, CO
 

I was trained with a family systems lens and am always considering complex dynamics as well as intergenerational trauma in my work with all clients- whether you come along with you family or as an individual. I also work with adopted and foster children, teens, and adults. I am an adoptee myself and have specialized training to serve this community from my participation in Portland State University's Foster and Adoption Therapy Certificate Program.

— Emelie Gagliardo, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I often see conflicts within immigrant families. I have seen clients who are the 1st generation complaining their kids becoming too Americanized and also seen clients who are the 2nd generation blaming their parents for putting unrealistic expectations on them. There is no universal way to "fix" it. I hope therapy can help navigate them to the healthier path.

— Junko Yamauchi, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Clara, CA

The desire to help families heal is what drew me to therapy. While I see a variety of clients, my study of family systems is the very foundation for my therapeutic beliefs. For this reason, I like having as many members of the family in the room as possible, where appropriate. I believe that individuals in a family are all influenced by any single member's behaviors. This is why I believe, healing is most effective in a family context.

— Christina Holyoak, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Pleasant Grove, UT
 

You’re tired of having the same weekly arguments, but never finding a resolution. Your teen constantly panics about everything, blanks out during tests, or doesn't get enough sleep. Maybe you and your partner disagree about how to handle conflict. The good news is that it doesn’t have to be this way! Therapy can help your family reconnect and stay connected by solving what feels unsolvable.

— Ashleigh Edelstein, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

At RISE we offer Conjoint Family and Relationship Counseling sessions. Each member of the family has the option of having their personal individual therapist that they work with individually and/or Conjointly with their family/relationships and their indivdualized therapist to maximize the benefits of family and relational therapy.

— Bet Shaddinger, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Fort Lauderdale, FL
 

I have worked with many individuals going through issues involving family conflict, with my goal being to help the individual understand the conflict more clearly, explore goals related to the conflict and to find peace in whatever way that might look.

— Jenny Friedman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Coral Gables, FL
 

Families are full of conflicts, and most people experience them at some point or another. The fact that conflicts are "normal" doesn't mean it feels good or that the behaviors you're experiencing are okay. I have found that many clients who seek counseling have some sort of past or present family issues that need to be processed and worked out. I have done extensive research on family systems theory and certain kinds of family issues, such as verbal and emotional abuse.

— Mary Bobowiec, Registered Mental Health Counselor Intern in Gainesville, FL
 

Individuals and systems are in constant interaction and interdependent. You cannot have one without the other. Your identity is formulated within and in response to your system, whatever that may be, and your system is impacted by your identity. Family therapy is informed by a number of practices and methods to aid communication, acceptance, and understanding of human development, grace, and connection. The specifics beyond this methodology are informed only by YOU.

— The Wellness Counseling Center, LLC, Licensed Professional Counselor in Harrisonville, MO