Family Conflict

Experiencing occasional conflict is very common, even in the closest of families. Sources of everyday conflict are typically things like miscommunication or misunderstandings. Serious, long-term conflicts can arise from things like substance abuse, financial problems, marital problems, a birth, a job change, or a big move. Whether the source of a families discord is major or minor, ongoing conflict can cause a lot of stress. Allowing conflict to linger and fester can cause lasting damage to familial relationships. If you and your family are experiencing ongoing conflicts, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s family conflict experts today.

Meet the specialists

My approach to treating families and couples is unique simply because each family and relationship is unique. From couples who are seeking a tune up or in crisis while dating, engaged, married and/or blended to those with one or multiple children, I apply a new systems theory & mode of therapy, The Gottman Method with my patients which has profound and powerful implications.

— Christina Eller, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY
 

The family unit may experience significant stress because of work, school, or the personality differences of various family members. In addition, as children grow and enter new phases in their lives, parents and children may need help in a safe environment to explore ways of coping with these changes. Our clinicians work with families and/or with a parent and a child to help them learn how to navigate transitions, communicate effectively, and develop an empathic, secure connection.

— Washington Psychological Wellness, Mental Health Practitioner in Gaithersburg, MD

A family session looks a lot different than individual therapy. I invite each member to each session and treat the family as a whole. I provide a safe space for members to share who they are and what they are feeling in order to move towards a connected, communicating family.

— Katy Niles, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA
 

We are trained to consider presenting issues from a contextual family systems lens and are always considering complex intergenerational trauma and other family dynamics in our work with all clients- whether you come to therapy with your family or as an individual.

— Sprout Therapy PDX, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

As a systemic thinker, I believe that a family is a unit. When one individual in a family is struggling, it is important to view the client in the context of the family. Especially for young children, I will often work with the caregivers to strengthen relationships and to problem-solve as a team. I strive to create an environment that feels safe and relevant to all ages, providing a range of tools and modalities.

— Miriam Porat, Counselor in Madison, WI
 

As a systemic thinker, I believe that a family is a unit. When one individual in a family is struggling, it is important to view the client in the context of the family. Especially for young children, I will often work with the caregivers to strengthen relationships and to problem-solve as a team.

— Miriam Porat, Counselor in Madison, WI

When addressing family conflict I like to look at it as a complex and multidimensional problem. I concentrate on identifying the different risks factors that cause conflict and disruption in the family system then focus on decreasing those risk factors and on increasing protective factors that directly affect the entire system. A lot of family conflict includes needing to address communication patterns, improve problem solving skills and increasing the level of respect in the entire system.

— Jaleesa Black, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

I am fascinated by families and I always have been. It was the first therapy that I started practicing as a clinician. Families are incredibly complex. The tendency of a family system is to maintain homeostasis, in other words, resist change. The trouble with this is that the systems surrounding the family are always changing, as are the individuals in the family. I can help your family adapt to changing roles, rules and challenges.

— Paige L. Freeman, Ph.D., PLLC, Psychologist
 

Creating a happy, healthy family environment is not as easy as it appears in social media! Getting help to address our family struggles is a healthy way to respond to the needs of each family member. When a child is hurting their behavior affects the whole family and the family affects that child. Family therapy can be incredibly healing and helpful. It can bring peace and comfort to a home or homes. I specialize in families with adolescents who are struggling beyond "normal teen behavior".

— Marni Doerfler, Counselor

I have a background in Functional Family Therapy and working with family systems. I also believe any work with children will involve work with their family, as family is the most important thing to a child.

— Dani Saliani, Counselor in Brooklyn, NY
 

As one who has struggled with this on a personal level I bring my own life/family of origin issues as well as my education and experience.

— Bradley Palmer, Counselor in Greensburg,, KY

I have facilitated scores of one or two session family meetings over the last 35 years. I love working with families and I’m very comfortable including several members in the sessions. I’ve seen up to 7 or 8 family members at one time. I can help each family member identify and clearly and directly communicate what they need for meaningful and effective interactions. Family members often discover in our sessions that early abandonment fears and experiences color their relationships. These messages have been passed down to second and third generations. By recognizing the language of rejection and identifying the cultural patterns that may be connected to rejecting behaviors, we can tame the cycle of negative messages that reverberates through the generations.

— Elayne Savage, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA
 

Much of my work focuses on how family of origin experiences impact how we operate as adults. Perhaps you have childhood wounds that continue to get replayed in your adult relationships, or you are having current struggles with your family. Through our work, we can look at setting boundaries to have the healthiest relationships possible.

— Kat Nazaroff, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Houston, TX

The stresses of everyday life, the need for improved work-life balance, a family crisis or mental health challenges for one or more family members can drain the energy from any family. I will work with your family to develop the tools to help you function better as a family unit. During our family sessions, family members learn to express and explore difficult thoughts and emotions safely, understand each other’s experiences and views, appreciate each other’s needs.

— LaTesha McIntosh, Clinical Social Worker in Richmond, VA
 

As a systemic thinker, I believe that a family is a unit. When one individual in a family is struggling, it is important to view the client in the context of the family. Especially for young children, I will often work with the caregivers to strengthen relationships and to problem-solve as a team.

— Miriam Porat, Counselor in Madison, WI
 

When a couple is experiencing a divorce, other members of the family are affected. Divorce is a transitional period for all family members involved, especially children. Divorce necessitates a reorganization of the family regarding proximity (both physical and emotional), boundaries, roles, expectations and rules. It can be helpful to have intentional conversations about these changes as a family to promote emotional health, adjustment, and healing.

— Arielle Fettman, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Portland, OR

The same fights, the same hurts, the same resentments. You don't have to just count the days until the kids are grown so you can leave. Together we can untangle the knot once and for all.

— Stefanie Rosen, Marriage & Family Therapist in Westlake Village, CA