Family Conflict

Experiencing occasional conflict is very common, even in the closest of families. Sources of everyday conflict are typically things like miscommunication or misunderstandings. Serious, long-term conflicts can arise from things like substance abuse, financial problems, marital problems, a birth, a job change, or a big move. Whether the source of a families discord is major or minor, ongoing conflict can cause a lot of stress. Allowing conflict to linger and fester can cause lasting damage to familial relationships. If you and your family are experiencing ongoing conflicts, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s family conflict experts today.

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Are you struggling to be seen or heard in your family? Do you wish you had more positive ways of interacting with your loved ones? Would you like to find new strategies for parenting your child or connecting with your teen? My work with families centers around reducing conflict and deepening connections throughout the family system by helping increase family members' capacities to communicate wants, needs, and feelings and helping create a family culture of openness and respect.

— Shelly Hogan, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

Chronic family problems can have lasting effects! From our family of origin, we develop our expectations of others, communication skills, outlook on life, ability to give and receive love, and coping skills, among other traits. Family problems from mild to severe will challenge every family at some point. These can result from behavioral and mental health issues in the family or from specific stressful events.

— Kelly Walsh, Mental Health Counselor in New Orleans, LA
 

I believe when family members come to therapy one thing is lacking... Communication! While I was in graduate school, I was taught to work with the whole family system not just one family member at a time. When the whole family unit can be heard in a safe place, healing can begin.

— Ally Doering, Marriage & Family Therapist in Brentwood, TN

Intimate relationships that are not safe, trusting or respectful hijack your sense of feeling valued. Any compulsion, addiction, or dysfunction in the family, when the focus is on one member affects all. It may be a serious illness, a recent death, or a huge life stressor that creates upheaval and discord in the family. This can result in estrangement, bickering, loneliness, and isolation. Healing is available and often can help develop stronger bonds.

— Barbara Beck, Marriage & Family Therapist in Leawood, KS
 

I believe we are hardwired to seek affirming and intimate bonds with others. Conflict with parents, partners, children, siblings, and extended family can cause significant stress and unhappiness. I can assist in developing communication skills, healthy boundaries, conflict resolution techniques, and relationship scripts. The goal is to establish relationships with others that are fulfilling and allow for personal growth.

— Carly Friedman, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in San Antonio, TX

My course of graduate study emphasized family systems. I then put this study to work with families and relationships who were experiencing distress. I have experience in a therapeutic capacity and in the capacity of a crisis worker reuniting families in lockout or runaway situations, meaning either the child has run away from home or the family has refused to allow the child to return. Having had experience in high-stress situations, I am comfortable working with any level of conflict.

— Meg Six, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , MI
 

Life can become increasingly more difficult when the home becomes a hell. Family therapy can help untangle miscommunication issues, unhealthy boundaries, and overall dysfunction. I work with families with adult children learn to navigate how to have lifelong mutually benefiting relationships.

— Deborah Knight, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Hinsdale, IL

Working in family treatment for almost four years. Assisting families to repair relationships and offer problem solving strategies. Emphasis in family therapy in graduate school.

— Elizabeth Fulsher, Clinical Social Worker in Vancouver, WA
 

Life can become increasingly more difficult when the home becomes a hell. Family therapy can help untangle miscommunication issues, unhealthy boundaries, and overall dysfunction. I work with families with adult children navigate

— Deborah Knight, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Hinsdale, IL

Families are marked by periods of transition and change, which are often painful, intense, and have the potential to crack the foundation of solid relational grounding and connection. I collaborate with families to explore new meanings and make sense of challenges, to better hear and understand one another's perspectives, and to discover ways to move forward despite their shared problems. I lean heavily on systemic family therapy models to help families move toward growth and resiliency.

— Jen Davis, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

The COVID-19 pandemic has upended the unspoken and agreed-upon relationship/marital norms. For many of us, couples who spent all day at work are now spending most of their time working from home. For many families, couples who are not privileged to work from home are coping with the stress of the added risk of contracting COVID-19. Many of us are also struggling with our family income being negatively impacted due to the pandemic.

— Eldridge Greer, Clinical Psychologist in Denver, CO

It is difficult to heal when someone from our families may cause us to resort back to unhealthy relationship patterns. I like to explore family dynamics first to see if this person might be a trigger without even realizing it. If you feel this way, then perhaps we can explore ways to identify what a comfortable boundary is for you to set. Family therapy may also be an option if all parties are open to improving this relationship.

— Melanie Kohn, Therapist in Chicago, IL
 

Struggling with relationships with family members, family or origin or someone close to you? Maybe you have a toxic or abusive family member? Family conflict can be distressing and make you feel alienated. Let me help you navigate these issues and create a plan so that you can have the peace and valuable relationships you deserve!

— Lauren Butcher, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Wylie, TX

Inner child work may help those experiencing interpersonal conflict. Inner child work helps explore unprocessed childhood emotions and feelings that currently impact one’s life and understanding, managing, and/or reducing triggers. One desire for inner child work may be to identify wounded areas and/or unmet needs of the child, learn to advocate, protect, or show compassion for the child, create a safe enough space to invite the child to play, and integrate the child with the adult self.

— Shavonne James, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Long Beach, CA
 

It is difficult to heal when someone from our families may cause us to resort back to unhealthy relationship patterns. I like to explore family dynamics first to see if this person might be a trigger without even realizing it. If you feel this way, then perhaps we can explore ways to identify what a comfortable boundary is for you to set. Family therapy may also be an option if all parties are open to improving this relationship.

— Melanie Kohn, Therapist in Chicago, IL

In my role as a family-based therapist at Child Guidance Resource Centers, I served the Philadelphia community through intensive home- and community-based family therapy for children and adolescents displaying social, emotional and behavioral disorders and for their families from 2019-2022. I am deeply committed, personally and professionally, to delivering culturally competent treatment to underserved populations in the community.

— Jesse Smith, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
 

Family Conflict can happen when family members have different views or beliefs that clash. Peaceful resolution depends on negotiation and respect for the other person’s point of view. Effect communication is key.

— Heather Landry, Licensed Professional Counselor in Lafayette, LA