Collaborative Couple Therapy

Collaborative couple therapy is a therapeutic technique that helps couples understand how they communicate when struggling with an issue or argument. The focus of collaborative couple therapy is teaching partners how to turn those fights into intimate conversations, and in turn, strengthen the relationship. In collaborative couple therapy, the therapist will sit in between the couple and speak as if they were one of the partners talking to the other. If one of the partners is 'fighting' by using stinging words, the therapist will attempt to translate those comments into confiding thoughts. If a partner is ‘withdrawing,’ the therapist will guess at what the individual is feeling, and ask if the guesses are correct. A successful outcome of collaborative couple therapy is experiencing intimacy in times of struggle, rather than fighting or withdrawing. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s collaborative couple therapy experts today. 

Meet the specialists

I have studied Tatkin, Gotman, and Real extensively and can teach you their wisdom about how couples can best learn to work together to ensure the health and sustainability of the union. This applies at any stage of a relationship, from brand new to many years. I also help couples who are ending their relationship do so in a collaborative way with minimal impact on their children.

— Dr. Judi Bloom, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

Coach couples online I work with both straight, unmarried and LGBT couples

— Michael Keane, Counselor in Jamaica Plain, MA

This is important when looking at those who we move most often thru life with. This can be your life partner or partners. This can also be someone you are separating with but by some connection such as children, you still must maintain a relationship. Im here to support the couples process at whatever stage.

— Rami Vissell, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Aptos, CA
 

With my client couples, I have used collaboration, meaning speaking with each client to discuss his or her needs and frustrations within the relationship. I believe collaborative therapy is key to establishing couple goals to benefit everyone. In my sessions, couples do not talk over each other, as communication is important in understanding what has or has not happened in the relationship.

— Deborah Vara, Counselor in Warrenton, VA

CCT is designed for couples who may be struggling with patterns of conflict in their relationship. The focus of CCT, then, is on helping partners work together in a collaborative way to solve problems and improve their relationship in the process. CCT therapists see a fight between partners as an opportunity for a conversation.

— Jamie Fister, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Mission Viejo, CA

In collaborative couple therapy, partners are encouraged to identify and express their “leading-edge” thoughts and feelings—the ones in the moment that motivate, distract, or linger in the mind or body.Then, they learn how to avoid cyclical fights and be better to each other, and communicate better.

— Christian Longue, Counselor in Austin, TX
 

Marital therapy identifies the marriage as the patient and that both parties are there to work on improving the marriage in whatever ways are needed. They collaborate to improve communication and identify problematic issues. Have also worked on healing past wounds so that they can proceed toward a more fulfilling relationship.

— Louise Will-Wallace, Psychologist in Falling Waters, WV

We as individuals form our unique worldviews by the attachment styles we develop with our parents, by the dynamics of our family relationships, friendships, and romantic partnerships throughout our lives. I work collaboratively in partnership with you, honoring your worldview, to recognize what’s going well in your family or couple dynamic, explore where and how you and your relationships can grow, and assisting you increase connection with your loved ones.

— Shelly Hogan, Counselor in Austin, TX