Codependency

Codependency, sometimes referred to as “relationship addiction," describes sacrificing one’s personal needs to try to meet the needs of others. Although it is often associated with romantic relationships, codependency can be experienced in all types of close relationships, including with family and friendships.  Someone who is codependent has an extreme focus outside themselves. Their thoughts and actions revolve around other people, such as a spouse or relative or they build their identity on helping or “saving” other people. Codependents typically experience feelings of low self-esteem, anxiety and insecurity in these relationships and may also experience perfectionism and control issues. Codependent symptoms can worsen if left untreated. If you are worried that you might be codependent, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s codependency experts today!

Need help finding the right therapist?
Find Your Match

Meet the specialists

 

Codependency is not an official mental illness, but it is a term that many people identify with. I help clients based on the definition created by the author and codependency expert Pia Mellody. She defines it as having difficulty with: - experiencing appropriate levels of self-esteem - setting functional boundaries - owning our own reality - acknowledging and meeting our own needs and wants and being interdependent with others - experiencing and expressing our reality moderately

— Liz Michaud, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

It's hard to fault someone for being compassionate, caring or laughing. Too often, other spray or take advantage our kindness and giving spirit. Inadvertently would give away our power and then find life sometimes hopeless. Learn how to regain your sense of self respect, security and Independence. I utilize CBT therapy for when

— Barbara Beck, Marriage & Family Therapist in Leawood, KS
 

Many people grow up in a chaotic home environment where healthy boundaries did not exist and where you were forced to be hypervigilant in order to keep the peace, maintain harmony, or appease a violent or unpredictable authority figure. As a result you struggle with maintaining your boundaries as an adult. Perhaps you constantly put others' needs before your own, are stretched too thin and become resentful, and you don't know where you end and others begin. I can help.

— Grace Yeh, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Cedar Park, TX

I specialize in working with clients who would like to address attachment wounds and address patterns, beliefs and behaviors that increase codependency. I strive to help my clients create healthy relationships with the self and others that include compassion, vulnerability, honesty and boundaries.

— Victoria Love, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Phoenix, AZ
 

This is a term that I don't use because I find a more accurate description of codependency is one that recognizes its roots in attachment wounds that often play out in family dynamics. Framing the boundary issues, emotional needs, relationship dynamics and control struggles that are common in co-dependency helps target the underlying and often wordless coping mechanisms and triggers that aid in treatment.

— Meira Greenfeld, Psychotherapist in Phoenix, AZ

With years of clinical experience and specialized training, I possess professional expertise in effectively treating codependency as a counselor. I prioritize fostering self-awareness, boundary-setting, and healthier relationship dynamics, guiding clients towards autonomy and emotional well-being. Through empathetic listening and collaborative goal-setting, I empower individuals to break free from codependent patterns and cultivate fulfilling lives.

— Karissa Tobey, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Saint Charles, IL
 

Codependency is often tied to the relationships that we have with addicts in our lives. Codependency is often defined as behaviors that enable behaviors we wish to see the end of but it often comes from a place of love, care and concern for others. The problem is that love, care and concern can result in giving too much to others. My goal in helping clients who struggle with codependency is to help them establish healthy boundaries so they can be supportive without overwhelming themselves.

— Aaron Bachler, Licensed Professional Counselor in Tempe, AZ

Co-dependency and people-pleasing go hand in hand. Often times, codependency is a symptom of a larger issue that's tied to safety and security in important relationships early on in life. I'm here to help you safely explore what's driving patterns of perfectionism, people-pleasing, and feelings of unworthiness so that you discover the freedom of living out of your most authentic, true self.

— Katie Webb, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Austin, TX
 

I am trained in and utilize Pia Mellody's "Developmental Immaturity" model of codependency treatment, known as Post Induction Therapy. https://www.themeadows.com/workshops/post-induction-therapy-pit/

— Aly Dearborn, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Codependency is often tied to the relationships that we have with addicts in our lives. Codependency is often defined as behaviors that enable behaviors we wish to see the end of but it often comes from a place of love, care and concern for others. The problem is that love, care and concern can result in giving too much to others. My goal in helping clients who struggle with codependency is to help them establish healthy boundaries so they can be supportive without overwhelming themselves.

— Aaron Bachler, Licensed Professional Counselor in Tempe, AZ
 

It's hard to fault someone for being compassionate, caring or kind. Too often, other prey or take advantage our kindness and giving spirit. Inadvertently, we give away our power and then find life sometimes hopeless. Learn how to regain your sense of self- respect, security and independence. I utilize CBT therapy to rewire our brain changing our thoughts. Changing our thoughts changes how we feel, thus altering our actions. Using DBT, mindfulness practices and gaining self-confidence help us to

— Barbara Beck, Marriage & Family Therapist in Leawood, KS

Codependency is a learned pattern of behavior that starts in childhood but often becomes no longer helpful or even harmful in adulthood. Common codependent behaviors include denying one's thoughts or feelings; giving too much of one's time, energy, or money; being too identified as a caretaker or giver in relationships, and a culminating exhaustion and fatigue. I can work with you to address each of these life-restricting symptoms and learn how to get your life back.

— Ross Kellogg, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Over 10 years of experience specializing in helping those with self-love deficiency (co-dependecy) learn how to love and care for themselves and create healthy relationship with themselves and others in their lives.

— Amy Green, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Online, WA

Having boundaries, saying now, and advocating for ourselves is difficult. This is especially true for highly sensitive individuals, women, and particularly sensitive women in male-dominated fields. I love supporting my clients in accessing their voice, their strength, and finding connection through differentiation.

— Devin Bard, Licensed Professional Counselor in Minneapolis, MN
 

Codependency means so much more than enabling with someone you love and today this idea has expanded to include adults who may or may not have lived with an addict. Codependency can more accurately be defined as the tendency to put others needs before your own; accommodating to others to such a degree that you tend to discount or ignore your own feelings, desires and basic needs.

— Gary Alexander, Therapist in Seattle, WA