Spirituality

The term spirituality has evolved and broadened over time and typically refers to a sense of connection to something bigger than ourselves. Spirituality is an expansive and wide-ranging concept encompassing many points of view. It often involves a search for meaning in life. Although it means different things to different people, spirituality can play an important role in helping people address mental health issues and maintain good mental health generally. A spiritual practice can help individuals stay grounded and provide a framework for coping with stress. If you are interested in expressing or exploring your spirituality as a part of therapy, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s spirituality experts today.

Meet the specialists

Deconstructing & reconstructing faith can be a messy process. I come from the Christian tradition and have embraced my own messy spirituality journey. My undergraduate and graduate degrees are from Christian institutions, and I am comfortable integrating spirituality into therapy if and when appropriate for clients. Faith plays an integral role in hope, community, and making meaning. Unfortunately, faith communities often do harm. Sifting through that can be sticky, let's do it together.

— Mackenzie Sodestrom, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

Spirituality most definitely does not mean that you have to embrace any existing concept of God. I like to work with folks to help them find a mode of spirituality that connects them with their intuition and their highest sense of self and purpose. Even if you hate all words and concepts connected with religion or "new age", we can work together to find that still sense of connection to something beyond yourself that will help feel a sense of purpose and rightness in the world.

— Angela Albert, Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Present moment is where I meet you. To help you find your ground, while also connecting with the vastness of who you are. Beyond your human suit, beyond your worries and fears, beyond your name. Your true essence. The part of this experience that you instinctually know holds all the love and wisdom you could ever ask for. Your soul. I am honored to walk beside you as reacquaint with your true Self. The journey into the light. We will find it if we start within.

— Danielle Knapp, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Austin, TX
 

Spirituality is a dimension of being human. Having training from an interfaith perspective, I am well-positioned to provide spiritually integrated psychotherapy or spiritual direction to practically all faiths. My dissertation was on whether or not family therapists around the US met the spiritual needs of their clients. One of the ways I do this is by recognizing the meaning-making processes around values clients have. This allows the sacred to be discussed alongside or within the secular.

— Daniel Stillwell, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Charlotte, NC

If you read my anxiety post, it's an easy leap to see how there are spiritual questions on most people's minds. Are you searching for "something" and can't find it? Are you questioning the beliefs your parents taught you, or even the beliefs you held not long ago? Are you wondering what "religion" is the "right" one? Are you uncomfortable with talking to friends and family because they'd judge you or ask questions you don't want to answer- or can't? You can express yourself here. You can ask the hard questions. (I don't claim to have all the answers!) You won't be judged. You will be challenged to find answers to your questions and given tools to help you do that. If you want someone to pray with you or for you I will do that. While I have my own beliefs, that of course I believe to be correct (or becoming more correct), I truly believe each person has their own journey they must travel and I'm here to help you on your path (not mine).

— Michelle Broweleit, Counselor in Vancouver, WA

With a background in youth ministry and interfaith leadership development, I have spent over ten years supporting individuals as they explore the evolving role of spirituality in their lives. I have learned that all of us have core beliefs and values that influence our interactions with the world. For clients struggling with their faith, I support processing of this experience. As requested, I integrate mindfulness practices, prayerful meditation, and Christian scripture in therapy.

— Stephanie Renny, Counselor in Cincinnati, OH
 

I offer support to persons who have left or are thinking about leaving high-control cultic groups. Many of these are religious in nature. Education and support can help you transition into "the world" and cope with shunning. I also offer support to those who are concerned about a loved one's group membership.

— Cathy S Harris, Counselor in Encinitas (San Diego Cty), CA
 

I know the Christian faith and Bible well. I graduated from a Seminary. I work with people of all faith (and no faith) backgrounds.

— Forest Benedict, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA

Spirituality is about experiencing our connection with ourselves, our community, and with the universe. This occurs in different ways for different people, and my role is to help you to more fully explore and make meaning around the spiritual connection that you experience and to help to remove blocks to finding your sense of purpose and fulfillment.

— Adam Richardson, Counselor in Boulder, CO
 

I conducted my doctoral research on spiritual emergence and am the director of a non profit dedicated to serving spiritual experiencers. I train other professionals about how to support those who have had spiritually transformative experiences such as near death experiences, kundalini awakenings, and episodes of unitive consciousness. I also help people to integrate shifts they have elicited through psychedlics, meditation, or yoga.

— Katrina Michelle, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY
 

I earned my PhD in clinical psychology by studying spirituality and transformation. As faculty at Yale University, I conducted research with atypical psychedelic substances. My first published article was on the spiritual and psychedelic potential of dextromethorphan. I have written and spoken about psychedelic science for over a decade, co-founded the Yale Psychedelic Science Group, and documented traditional healing and religious practices in Mexico.

— Peter Addy, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Vancouver, WA

My best definition of Spirituality would be "the ever expanding, ever deepening connection between Self and what you define as the All That Is." I believe to be spiritually lost can be a good thing, although it definitely doesn't feel that way. In therapy we will explore/uncover that connection between yourself and the Divine that, right now, may feel like emptiness or depression. Together, let's rediscover meaning, purpose and the joy of living a connected life.

— Dillon Welliver, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Tallahassee, FL
 

What kinds of people/stories/topics "move" you, speak to your heart, make you teary eyed? Are you passionate about a movement or cause? What is meaningful to you about your own life story? Discovering what is personally meaningful to you will aid in living a more fulfilling, purposeful, heart-centered life. I believe that we all have the innate capacity to connect to our own divine nature, and when we learn to access it, can help guide us to more meaningful living. I believe in mystery, and that not all things are to meant to be factual, scientific, or proven to be worthy of belief.

— Lisa Wheeler, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX

Spirituality cuts across all areas of our lives. There are various dimensions of it that go beyond any religious involvement and belief, which can be part of it. Other areas include your sense of vocation and purpose in life, what gives you a sense of meaning, the importance of symbols to you, and your emotional response to the divine or powers greater than yourself. All of these can impact your experiences including what led you to seek therapy or counseling, what can be helpful during the therapeutic process as well as add to your strengths afterwards. In the process of seeking peace and wholeness, you may find your existing spirituality is strong or you may explore parts of it that you want to look at differently. These are some of the ways that spirituality can be part of our journey together.

— Christopher Smith, Pastoral Counselor in Harrison, NY

Laura Giles believes that the expression of spirituality is as important a component of wholeness as the mind, body, and emotions. She will support you in whatever your beliefs are and encourage you to lean into that to support your journey through life.

— Laura Giles, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Henrico, VA
 

Religion and spirituality are a core part of the human experience. However, many of us have found ourselves wounded by the patriarchy, homophobia, and racial separatism found in so many western religions. Moreover, many people have found that the dogmatism found in religious institutions do not serve to hold space for their many questions and the mystery of the human experience. I invite my clients to talk about issues related to spirituality, such as questions about the meanings and purpose of life, questions about "God" and healing from harmful or lackluster experiences with religion.

— Addie Liechty, Clinical Social Worker in Oakland, CA

The fundamental approach in my life stems from my spiritual practice, a blend of buddhism, paganism, and a love for Passover. Some of my clients are not spiritually oriented, which is totally fine, I also understand secular approaches, including Humanism. However, if you wish to integrate your understanding and exploration of spirituality in your treatment, that works for me!

— kaseja wilder, Counselor in Eugene, OR
 

Connecting to true purpose is a process. It's much easier to explore with support from a specialist. I have a history of helping people get off the 9-5 hamster wheel and build a life around the unique purpose they were created for. Purpose seeking can feel like a dead end when you have bills to pay. But a meaningful day-to-day life is just around the corner through prioritizing your gifts.

— Kathryn Sills-Payne, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Oakland, CA

To me, spirituality encompasses the practice of asking life's big questions like: "Why are we here?" and "Am I happy?" or "What is my intended work and purpose?" and "What do I really believe in?" Inviting a spiritual connection into a counseling space can be helpful in getting to the heart of the matter instead of skimming the surface and making internal and environmental shifts that truly feel like you and last a lifetime.

— Alysa Romano, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Drawing upon an integral perspective, I work with people who are experiencing a wide variety of holistic changes of a profound and life altering nature.

— Mike Doogan, Counselor in Portland, OR

Religion and spirituality are a core part of the human experience. However, many of us have found ourselves wounded by the patriarchy, homophobia, and racial separatism found in so many western religions. Moreover, many people have found that the dogmatism found in religious institutions do not serve to hold space for their many questions and the mystery of the human experience. I invite my clients to talk about issues related to spirituality, such as questions about the meanings and purpose of life, questions about "God" and healing from harmful or lackluster experiences with religion.

— Addie Liechty, Clinical Social Worker in Oakland, CA
 

While I am clinically trained to offer services to most people who need help with stress, anxiety, and relationships, I can also offer a Christian perspective on anxiety and relationships for those who want to work on these issues with someone who understands and respects the Christian worldview. I have heard from many Christians that they want to have a counselor who can identify with with Biblical concepts with which they were raised or believe to be an important part of their lives.

— Jim Ciraky, Counselor in Canton, GA