Spirituality

The term spirituality has evolved and broadened over time and typically refers to a sense of connection to something bigger than ourselves. Spirituality is an expansive and wide-ranging concept encompassing many points of view. It often involves a search for meaning in life. Although it means different things to different people, spirituality can play an important role in helping people address mental health issues and maintain good mental health generally. A spiritual practice can help individuals stay grounded and provide a framework for coping with stress. If you are interested in expressing or exploring your spirituality as a part of therapy, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s spirituality experts today.

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My theoretical orientation is transpersonal, which translates to "beyond the self." Transpersonal psychology marries humanistic psychology with spiritual, transcendant, or unseen aspects of the human experience. In therapy with me, this orientation means that I will honor and accept all of your lived experience, as well as incorporate it into your healing. Want to use tarot cards to help conceptualize yourself? Sure! Have intuitive gifts that you don't want to feel judged for? Count me in!

— Breanna Swanson, Psychotherapist in Seattle, WA

Dr. Inez is informed by Jungian archetypology, ritual, ceremony, Taoist, mindfulness, and pagan approaches when working with psychedelics for consciousness expansion.

— Janine Inez, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner in New York, NY
 

I believe that, broadly speaking, spirituality is a concern for everyone. The big picture and the largest questions of life are contained in it. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace wrote, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough."

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA

Spirituality is best understood as our sense of being fully human, experiencing ourselves as a part of life, not an object in isolation. Healthy spirituality doesn't require a theistic understanding, and having a theistic understanding doesn't guarantee us feeling fully human. I am a respectful and knowledgable therapist for those not interested in religion, religious minorities, AND those who seek a more meaningful connection to their own mainstream religion.

— Christine Bates, Licensed Professional Counselor in Oxford, MS
 

Spirituality is not synonymous with religion. It is the intentional practice of conscious awareness that our existence transcends our physical body and influences the existence of all that surrounds us. Growing as spiritual beings leads us to open our mind and heart to trust our intuitive wisdom that our body sensations gift us daily, so that we may be in constant connection with our true purpose in order to thrive in all that we are and all that we do.

— Maritza Plascencia, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Irvine, CA

The fundamental approach in my life stems from my spiritual practice, a blend of buddhism, paganism, and a love for Passover. Some of my clients are not spiritually oriented, which is totally fine, I also understand secular approaches, including Humanism. However, if you wish to integrate your understanding and exploration of spirituality in your treatment, that works for me!

— kaseja wilder, Psychotherapist in Eugene, OR
 

Spirituality is the focal point of my life. I've been meditating for 50 years and am trained as a nondual spiritual teacher. I'm happy to help clients deepen their connection to their own spirituality and offer guidance and support. During sessions, I rest deeply in presence and shared this depth of peace with clients.

— Elinor (Elly) Nygren Szapiro, Licensed Professional Counselor in Northwest, AR

I believe that, broadly speaking, spirituality is a concern for everyone. The big picture and the largest questions of life are contained in it. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace said, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough."

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

I specialize in religious trauma, spiritual abuse, and recovery from high demand religions. I have written a workbook/journal to help individuals navigate faith transitions. I am a member of the Mormon Mental Health Association and work primarily with those on the Mormon spectrum (active to ex members). I am especially passionate about helping fellow members of the LGBTQIA+ community find healing in this area. I love helping my clients find new meaning after experiencing these transitions.

— Mellissa Perry Hill, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Mesa, AZ

Many types of therapy can approach individuals in an overly scientific way, regarding mental health primarily through diagnoses and treatment strategies. In addition to being trained psychoanalytically, I have also been theologically trained to account for the spiritual dimension that plays a role in the process of healing. Whatever your spiritual orientation is, even if you are atheist, I offer an integrated approach to support your healing journey.

— Bryan Owens, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Indianapolis, IN
 

I provide a safe space for you to explore how your faith* background and experiences, whether positive, negative, or mixed, has shaped you. In therapy, you can safely unpack these experiences, gain clarity on how they affect your life, and discover how you want to move forward. (In this context, I use the word “faith” as an all-inclusive term referring to a belief system of any sort, such as spirituality, organized religion, philosophy, or moral code.)

— Lydia Anthony, Licensed Professional Counselor in Schertz, TX

I believe that, broadly speaking, spirituality is a concern for everyone. The big picture and the largest questions of life are contained in it. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace said, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough."

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

I have lived experience in high-control religion, and have nuanced expertise in religious trauma healing work. I would be happy to create a space where you can focus on on deconstructing the intersection of whiteness and white supremacy, fundamentalism, body shame/control, anti-fatness, anti-queerness, compulsory heteronormativity and monogamy, purity culture, perfectionism and existential dread. I also offer periodic religious trauma groups, if healing in a group context is more your speed.

— Emma Thompson, Registered Marriage and Family Therapist Intern in Minneapolis, MN

I have a dedicated daily meditation practice and also love to participate in silent retreats as often as possible. I am also a certified mindfulness educator through Mindful Schools and have taught mindfulness to a wide variety of folks, including youth in juvenile hall, high school faculty members, and groups in a wellness center for our aging population. I have helped people from diverse cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds learn and embrace the benefits of living their life more mindfully.

— David Watson, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Culver City, CA
 

In my practice, I integrate mindfulness, somatic practices, and client-centered exploration to honor the intersection of spirituality and the mind-body connection in sexuality. Through compassionate inquiry and tailored interventions, I help individuals cultivate awareness, acceptance, and connection with their bodies, enhancing their sexual well-being and overall sense of wholeness.

— Dr. Denise Renye, Sex Therapist in san francisco, CA

My background in spiritual work goes back about 10 years. In my sessions, I integrate tarot and tools associated with divination, energy work concepts, mythology, archetypes, and fairytales. I believe that psychotherapy, as a ritual, is a magical process. I am a practicing pagan and am informed on various Pagan, Animist, Occult, and Earth-based spiritualities.

— Kyra Paules, Clinical Social Worker in Boiling Springs, PA
 

I believe that a holistic awareness of self includes how we understand our place in the universe. We all grapple with who we are and how to find meaning and purpose in life, whether we are atheist, agnostic, religious, recovering from religion trauma, spiritual, or somewhere in between. My graduate degree concentration was Mindfulness-based Transpersonal Counseling, and I aim to support you in exploring and defining your own sense of spirituality (or lack thereof) on your own terms.

— Julie Osburne, Associate Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

My education and clinical experience includes working with people from all walks of life and have experienced all kinds of systemic challenges.I’m GREAT at doing a thorough clinical evaluation that considers YOUR healing, wellness, and spirituality on your terms, in your own words. I identify as a spiritual minority and am compassionate towards others who also identify this way.

— Wendy Howell, Licensed Professional Counselor in Glendale, AZ
 

I often work at the intersection of trauma, spirituality and chronic pain. How we make meaning of our suffering and what it means to be a human at this time in our evolution are huge questions we humans grapple with. I believe and have seen how incorporating your own spirituality into healing can be profound (this can also be, I believe in nothing - that this is just it.) Other-times, folks have trauma around spirituality and/or their religion. Together we can slowly unpack this.

— Emily Natale, Create Art & Wellness, Art Therapist in Providence, RI