Narrative Therapy

Narrative therapy is a therapeutic approach that seeks to help people identify their values and the skills and knowledge they have to live these values, so they can effectively confront whatever problems they face. The narrative therapy approach views problems as separate from people and assumes people have many skills, abilities, values, commitments, beliefs and competencies that will assist them in changing their relationship with the problems influencing their lives. A therapist who specializes in narrative therapy will help their client co-author a new narrative about themselves by investigating the history of those qualities. Narrative therapy is a respectful, non-judgmental, social justice approach that ultimately helps individuals to externalize their issues rather than internalize them. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s narrative therapy experts today.

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"Narrative therapy is a therapeutic approach that seeks to help people identify their values and the skills and knowledge they have to live these values, so they can effectively confront whatever problems they face. The narrative therapy approach views problems as separate from people and assumes people have many skills, abilities, values, commitments, beliefs and competencies that will assist them in changing their relationship with the problems influencing their lives." From Therapy Den

— Andy Dishman, Licensed Professional Counselor in MARIETTA, GA
 

Therapy that is focused on the language you are using to create your reality. Words have a lot of power because our words become our thoughts which become our emotions which become out behavior. The way we tell the story of the reality we live in affects how we make choices and move through the world in the future. This therapy focuses on changing the narratives your have about your life as well as identifying negative language and thinking patterns that keep your stuck in pain.

— George Goldston, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Johns Island, SC

Narrative therapy is my favorite therapeutic orientation. It's the treatment that I study the most and find very compelling. I often observe the most improvement in clients when I use this type of counseling. Introducing new ways of thinking and believing can be a tricky thing but with the training and passion I have for it I often times see success.

— Jeff Guenther, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Narrative therapy honors the knowledge held by the individual. The approach is collaborative in assisting the client to explore his/her preferred options in life. Narrative therapy allows the individual to separate the problems from his/her identity opening options to the current circumstance.

— Maribel Higuera, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA

I use a narrative approach to therapy which is non-blaming and separates problems from people. I am collaborative.

— Rachelle Miller, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Spokane Valley, WA
 

Everyone's story is different, and this approach focuses on how you want your story to be told. In sessions, we talk about the stories people have placed on you and reframe them to fit the version you want to tell instead.

— Katherine Traxler, Marriage and Family Therapist Associate

When working with my clients who have negative self-image or deal with traumatic pasts, use the powerful metaphor of story in the Narrative Therapy Approach. This helps clients re-story their past and acknowledge their problems as separate from themselves.

— Alexa von Oertzen, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Coral Springs, FL
 

Everyone has a story, and each story has meaning. It is these narratives that shape our experiences and our perception of the world and ourselves. I have used narrative therapy interventions for many years to successfully help others to identify personal strengths and learn to overcome their current obstacles.

— Flor Leal, Psychologist

With Narrative Therapy. I assist you creating a new narrative and story for your life. With Narrative Therapy, my space will allow you an ability to tell your story, Furthermore, we work on self talk and empowerment based language. The things we tell ourselves and others DO guide the way we view OUR story (aka our lives). This modality also allows for exploring existentialism based thinking. This means you are free and responsible to determine your own development.

— Rachael Jordan, Counselor in Puyallup, WA
 

I love narrative therapy because of how empowering it is. We're the script writers of our own lives, the narrators, and we have the power to change the perspective.

— Danielle Eaton, Counselor

Narrative Therapy is my go-to. I believe in the power of story. In Native American culture, healing circles exist where people share stories as medicine. If we view our problems as stories rather than an extension of ourselves, it's easier to rewrite the story in a more positive light than to feel like something is wrong with us. There is healing in owning your story and sharing it. We don't erase parts of the story but view them in a more positive lens to help gain a direction moving forward.

— Christina Scott, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Portsmouth, OH
 

Your story matters and you get to decide how you want to tell it. I do work with clients to look back at their past as well as forward to the future in a way that helps them think about how they are storying their life and how they want to continue to tell that story. We are constantly telling ourselves a narrative of how and why things happen. We tell a narrative that has been influenced by multiple people in our lives. I help you examine these influences and find your own inner truth teller.

— Emily Stone, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

Viewing the client as the expert in their own life, narrative therapy offers the opportunity to examine the meaning clients make of their life experiences. As the client guides the conversation to areas of interest, the therapist supports them to explore, expand, and deepen their understanding of themselves.

— Chelsea Newton, Clinical Social Worker in Golden, CO
 

Having read original sources from developers of this model, I find Narrative Therapy is the best compliment to my feminist identity. This model prompts us to challenge our concrete understandings of the world, and invites nuance into our interpretation of stories. I practice NT as a way to access traumas and triumphs in life, a way to identify problems in your life that are not inherent to who you are. NT gives us the opportunity to look at the origins of beliefs that cause upset emotions.

— Ginelle Krummey, Mental Health Counselor in Asheville, NC

I promote a sex-positive treatment approach and empower my clients to shift out of narratives that have kept them disconnected so that they can reclaim feelings of curiosity, compassion, and self-discovery that are crucial to embodied sexual experiences. We will work together to identify perspectives that have kept you feeling stuck and build new insights that empower you to move forward in a way that is authentic to you.

— Jessica Byrd, Counselor in Tempe, AZ
 

Narrative therapy offers a collaborative approach that views people and problems as separate. A client reporting a relationship with depression would not be labeled as depressed, but rather, would be viewed as persons who are sometimes paid a visit by depression. We all have a one of a kind way to heal. I work with you to explore and discover that unique formula. I am open to all mediums, poetry, music and other holistic healing forms to find a way to heal your soul.

— Maile Grace, Therapist in Denver, CO

Narrative therapy helps people look at their concerns and realize that they can overcome them or not be affected by them as much as they used to be. It's a matter of shifting perspectives and thoughts into a healthier frame that we can then use to guide our mental health journey onto a more positive path.

— Courtney Cohen, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

What happened to us? Why do we do that? Why is my brain telling me that? From each experience, we tell a story and make meaning. Eventually, our stories repeat themselves. We have the stories that repeat through life and become our identity as a family member, friend, employee, or student. Sometimes the stories are told to us, beginning in childhood. Narrative therapy lets us examine our stories and retell them as the narrator with many stories rather than as the passive listener.

— Rebekah Lubeck, Social Worker in Portland, OR