Narrative Therapy

Narrative therapy is a therapeutic approach that seeks to help people identify their values and the skills and knowledge they have to live these values, so they can effectively confront whatever problems they face. The narrative therapy approach views problems as separate from people and assumes people have many skills, abilities, values, commitments, beliefs and competencies that will assist them in changing their relationship with the problems influencing their lives. A therapist who specializes in narrative therapy will help their client co-author a new narrative about themselves by investigating the history of those qualities. Narrative therapy is a respectful, non-judgmental, social justice approach that ultimately helps individuals to externalize their issues rather than internalize them. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s narrative therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

Narrative therapy helps people look at their concerns and realize that they can overcome them or not be affected by them as much as they used to be. It's a matter of shifting perspectives and thoughts into a healthier frame that we can then use to guide our mental health journey onto a more positive path.

— Courtney Cohen, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

Used as an adjunct modality to help process trauma and change through verbal examination.

— Dorothy Smith, Counselor in Centreville, VA

We all have stories about ourselves, our relationships, and our sexuality. Sometimes these stories keep you stuck in anxiety, shame, guilt and disconnection. Using Narrative Therapy, I help you get to know these stories you have and begin to identify what you really believe and value. Narrative Therapy also involves looking at how your family, past partners, and societal messaging may impact these stories that hold you back.

— Taylor Kravitz, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Portland, OR
 

I have an integrated approach to counseling that utilizes both narrative therapy and relational cultural therapy in a queer intersectional framework.

— Gene Dockery, Licensed Professional Counselor in Newark, OH

Narrative therapy offers a collaborative approach that views people and problems as separate. A client reporting a relationship with depression would not be labeled as depressed, but rather, would be viewed as persons who are sometimes paid a visit by depression. We all have a one of a kind way to heal. I work with you to explore and discover that unique formula. I am open to all mediums, poetry, music and other holistic healing forms to find a way to heal your soul.

— Maile Grace, Therapist in Denver, CO
 

Narrative Therapy is my go-to. I believe in the power of story. In Native American culture, healing circles exist where people share stories as medicine. If we view our problems as stories rather than an extension of ourselves, it's easier to rewrite the story in a more positive light than to feel like something is wrong with us. There is healing in owning your story and sharing it. We don't erase parts of the story but view them in a more positive lens to help gain a direction moving forward.

— Christina Scott, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Portsmouth, OH

Life is a series of experiences that we catalog as stories. These stories hold a collection of ideas and beliefs that we have observed from others and that we have been taught. Some of these stories center around problems that we are experiencing. So we explore the stories, remove the problem, examine if it still serves your goals and purposes, and rewrite it in a way that makes sense for you.

— Crystal Clark, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA
 

Often the stories we tell ourselves, or others tell about us, frame who we are. Sometimes these stories also find ways of binding us to behaviors that might not be the best for us. Working with these stories and finding new ways of looking at them can be a useful way of starting to change how we view ourselves and the ways others view us as well.

— Dr. David Shoup, Psychologist in Pacifica, CA

I love narrative therapy because of how empowering it is. We're the script writers of our own lives, the narrators, and we have the power to change the perspective.

— Danielle Eaton, Counselor
 

I use a narrative approach to therapy which is non-blaming and separates problems from people. I am collaborative.

— Rachelle Miller, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Spokane Valley, WA

Narrative Theory is a hope-based approach to counseling that actively works to empower you. The goal is for you to take an active role in how you live your life and understand the challenges you face. This is accomplished by exploring you and your experiences to find and leverage strengths that you possess that are either hidden, forgotten, or haven't been discovered yet. Through Narrative theory, you take an active part in becoming the best version of yourself.

— Jacob Santhouse, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Nampa, ID
 

"Narrative therapy is a therapeutic approach that seeks to help people identify their values and the skills and knowledge they have to live these values, so they can effectively confront whatever problems they face. The narrative therapy approach views problems as separate from people and assumes people have many skills, abilities, values, commitments, beliefs and competencies that will assist them in changing their relationship with the problems influencing their lives." From Therapy Den

— Andy Dishman, Licensed Professional Counselor in MARIETTA, GA

I have a background/MA in journalism/writing & have found the practice of truly looking at the stories we tell about our lives can be deeply insightful & helpful when working towards a greater quality of life. Putting the stories our minds tell us down on paper, journaling, even writing in a stream of consciousness can be enlightening & empowering by allowing us to clearly see these stories we tell, so we can edit them, rewrite them or even throw them out as we grow.

— Lara Plutte, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA
 

Viewing the client as the expert in their own life, narrative therapy offers the opportunity to examine the meaning clients make of their life experiences. As the client guides the conversation to areas of interest, the therapist supports them to explore, expand, and deepen their understanding of themselves.

— Chelsea Newton, Clinical Social Worker in Golden, CO

Narrative therapy honors the knowledge held by the individual. The approach is collaborative in assisting the client to explore his/her preferred options in life. Narrative therapy allows the individual to separate the problems from his/her identity opening options to the current circumstance.

— Maribel Higuera, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA
 

If we see ourselves as the authors of our own lives, able to create and recreate new versions of ourselves, we clearly hold the keys to the door of healing. I work with you to make sense of your story and look at ways to make adjustments to the way you see yourself and present yourself to others.

— Leah Rockwell, Licensed Professional Counselor in Mercersburg, PA

I use narrative therapy help people to identify their values and the skills associated with them. It provides the knowledge of their ability to live these values so they can effectively confront current and future problems. Is a style of therapy that helps people become—and embrace being—an expert in their own lives. In narrative therapy, there is an emphasis on the stories we develop and carry with us through our lives.

— Julie Williams, Counselor
 

A basic assumption of narrative psychotherapy is that people are inherently resourceful and the experts on their own lives. We focus on client’s strengths when discussing problems, creating a context for therapy to move in a positive direction. All individuals, couples and families have the ability to overcome problems and achieve more fulfilling stories for the future.

— lauren malkasain, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA

I use narrative therapy techniques to recreate and rewrite the internal story if you have of yourself in relationship to other, your community and the world.

— Kieran Mcmonagle, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA