Narrative Therapy

Narrative therapy is a therapeutic approach that seeks to help people identify their values and the skills and knowledge they have to live these values, so they can effectively confront whatever problems they face. The narrative therapy approach views problems as separate from people and assumes people have many skills, abilities, values, commitments, beliefs and competencies that will assist them in changing their relationship with the problems influencing their lives. A therapist who specializes in narrative therapy will help their client co-author a new narrative about themselves by investigating the history of those qualities. Narrative therapy is a respectful, non-judgmental, social justice approach that ultimately helps individuals to externalize their issues rather than internalize them. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s narrative therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

Together we identify and engage the incremental steps leading in the directions you want to go, diminishing the power of problem narratives in the process. Todays climate is very difficult and Im hoping to accompany you along your path wherever it takes us.

— Eric Katende, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Narrative Theory is a hope-based approach to counseling that actively works to empower you. The goal is for you to take an active role in how you live your life and understand the challenges you face. This is accomplished by exploring you and your experiences to find and leverage strengths that you possess that are either hidden, forgotten, or haven't been discovered yet. Through Narrative theory, you take an active part in becoming the best version of yourself.

— Jacob Santhouse, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Nampa, ID

If we see ourselves as the authors of our own lives, able to create and recreate new versions of ourselves, we clearly hold the keys to the door of healing. I work with you to make sense of your story and look at ways to make adjustments to the way you see yourself and present yourself to others.

— Leah Rockwell, Licensed Professional Counselor in Mercersburg, PA
 

Narrative therapy is my favorite therapeutic orientation. It's the treatment that I study the most and find very compelling. I often observe the most improvement in clients when I use this type of counseling. Introducing new ways of thinking and believing can be a tricky thing but with the training and passion I have for it I often times see success.

— Jeff Guenther, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

I use a narrative approach to therapy which is non-blaming and separates problems from people. I am collaborative.

— Rachelle Miller, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Spokane Valley, WA
 

I believe we all story our lives against the backdrop of our personal discourse, family discourse, and societal discourse. Some of the stories we identify with have been beneficial yet others have been less helpful or even hinder us to reach the goals and contentment we seek. I work from a strengths-based approach to work collaboratively with clients to create change and to coauthor their stories and strive for the change they are seeking.

— Dan Schmitt, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Eugene, OR

Narrative therapy helps clients recognize their current story about themselves, often a learned and conditioned reality rather than based on their own values and integrity, and create a new narrative that feels congruent to who they are and create possibilities for their future. Therapy is exploring challenges as separate from oneself and how to find solutions to challenges rather than identifying with them.

— Eileen Martin, Counselor in Gibsonville, NC

I find narrative therapy to be one of the most powerful tools we have. Whether you are grieving the death of someone or are a survivor of abuse, telling our story can be one of the hardest and most rewarding experiences. I never ask clients to share this immediately - I always first want you to feel safe in our therapeutic relationship - but when the time is right, I will likely ask you to write your story to be read, sometimes for several sessions, until you feel you are reclaiming your power.

— Amy Ruesche, Social Worker in Colorado Springs, CO
 

We all have stories to tell. Sometimes, when our depression, anxiety or grief gets too big, those stories seem to all become dark and overwhelming. Narrative therapy allows you to share those stories and when you are ready, I can guide you to other stories in your life that bring up more positive feelings. By doing this, we can work on finding the skills and tools you have already used in your past to address the struggles you have going on today. You have the tools, we just have to find them.

— Amanda Dutton, Counselor in Stockbridge, GA

Narrative therapy is a strengths-based theory in which the therapist helps you to consider the stories about yourself and the world that you have internalized, which may be affecting the way you currently perceive challenges that arise. Narrative therapists make a point to lead with curiosity and will walk alongside you in discovery. Using a Narrative perspective, I can help provide you with a framework to understand the challenges you are experiencing and any changes you wish to make.

— Nicole Ruttenberg, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Shoreline, WA
 

Narrative therapy is a form of psychotherapy that seeks to help patients identify their values and the skills associated with them. It provides the patient with knowledge of their ability to live these values so they can effectively confront current and future problems.

— Nadirah Habeebullah, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Kansas City, MO

In my training, we focused specifically on Narrative Therapy. We all have stories and pieces of our identity that play a role in who we have become and where we are going. Sometimes, reexamining those stories and being aware of our identity or what we want our identity to be can make all the difference.

— Veronica Llanos-Davis, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Antonio, TX
 

Narrative therapy helps clients recognize their current story about themselves, often a learned and conditioned reality rather than based on their own values and integrity, and create a new narrative that feels congruent to who they are and create possibilities for their future. Therapy is exploring challenges as separate from oneself and how to find solutions to challenges rather than identifying with them.

— Eileen Martin, Counselor in Gibsonville, NC

Narrative Therapy helps you identify your values, skills, knowledge, and the role in life you hold. In identifying these, Narrative Therapy helps you live these philosophies out in your life, so that you effectively confront whatever problems you may face.

— Brenda Cordova, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Stockton, CA
 

Your story matters and how you tell that story dictates the role that you play going forward. Narrative Therapy utilises different ways of using language to understand how we interact with our problems and how we can become autonomous participants in our story, rather than continuing to play out old patterns that no longer serve us.

— Kelsey Hoff, Therapist in Saskatoon,