Narrative Therapy

Narrative therapy is a therapeutic approach that seeks to help people identify their values and the skills and knowledge they have to live these values, so they can effectively confront whatever problems they face. The narrative therapy approach views problems as separate from people and assumes people have many skills, abilities, values, commitments, beliefs and competencies that will assist them in changing their relationship with the problems influencing their lives. A therapist who specializes in narrative therapy will help their client co-author a new narrative about themselves by investigating the history of those qualities. Narrative therapy is a respectful, non-judgmental, social justice approach that ultimately helps individuals to externalize their issues rather than internalize them. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s narrative therapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

Our problems do not define us, we are separate from them. There is great importance in both the words we use inside our mind to communicate with ourselves (self-talk) and the beliefs we have about the role we play in the story of our life. I can help you gain a new empowered perspective so you can "rewrite" the story of your future.

— Karen Harris, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Clackamas, OR
 

I'm trained in narrative therapy, which is an approach that recognized that just telling your story can be a healing act-but that it's even more powerful when you get to re-author your life. You don't have to keep living the same story.

— Jessica Foley, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Waltham, MA

The stories we are told about our lives, whether by society, others, or ourselves, dramatically impact the trajectories of our lives.

— Grant Gordin, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

Narrative approaches include an understanding that the Problem and the Person are separable, that the Problem is one created by the stories told about Problems and people who know them well, and that through exploring the other parts of one's experiences, the Person and small groups, with their strengths and beauty, can rise above. Problems are integrated with all the people who interact with a Problem, so this approach can include additional members of the community, advocacy and activism.

— Rae Blaisdell, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Colorado Springs, CO

More of a traditional "talk therapy" session, engaged in conversational communication that allows the therapist and client to both ask questions and give feedback, still in an unbiased and non-judgemental environment. Narrative therapy is a form of psychotherapy that seeks to help people identify their values and the skills and knowledge they have to live these values, so they can effectively confront whatever problems they face.

— Amanda Dutton, Licensed Professional Counselor in Stockbridge, GA
 

We all have stories to tell. Sometimes, when our depression, anxiety or grief gets too big, those stories seem to all become dark and overwhelming. Narrative therapy allows you to share those stories and when you are ready, I can guide you to other stories in your life that bring up more positive feelings. By doing this, we can work on finding the skills and tools you have already used in your past to address the struggles you have going on today. You have the tools, we just have to find them.

— Amanda Dutton, Counselor in Stockbridge, GA

I have completed graduate-level coursework and post-graduate continuing education seminars in Narrative Therapy. I am also an active member of the Seattle Narrative Group where I consult with clinicians who have received training from the mothers and fathers of Narrative Therapy.

— Brian Prester, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Seattle, WA
 

Therapy that is focused on the language you are using to create your reality. Words have a lot of power because our words become our thoughts which become our emotions which become out behavior. The way we tell the story of the reality we live in affects how we make choices and move through the world in the future. This therapy focuses on changing the narratives your have about your life as well as identifying negative language and thinking patterns that keep your stuck in pain.

— George Goldston, Counselor in Beaverton, OR

Narrative therapy is all about taking control of your own story. We often let other people write our stories for us - how frustrating! It’s time to the the power back, lift your pen, and get to writing the story you’ve always dreamed of living.

— Mackenzi Kingdon, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA

Narrative Therapy teaches us that language has power. In this kind of counseling, the therapist witnesses your story, and--if you wish--works with you to write a new next chapter. Each time we tell our story, we are empowered to create unique outcomes. We can externalize our problems and create space in our lives for new ways of thinking, feeling, and behaving. We can get honest about the role of culture, family, and society in our problems. We can be the narrator, the hero, and the author.

— Annalisa Smithson, Therapist in Pottstown, PA
 

Narrative Therapy helps individuals understand that the way that they think about and talk about their life story is based on a particular set of perspectives. IF we shift these perspectives we can see the same story from a different orientation which changes the tone and mood of the story. Often people think about and talk about themselves in a way that is saturated with problems. IF they look at their stories from a different perspective, they often find strength and success.

— Mark Best, Clinical Social Worker in Vancouver, WA

I primarily utilize narrative therapies in helping others heal from difficult life events. Re-authoring your personal narrative is a powerful and proven way of concluding trauma symptoms and moving forward to a more meaningful and purpose driven life.

— Emily Arth, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Columbia, MO
 

I use a narrative approach to therapy which is non-blaming and separates problems from people. I am collaborative.

— Rachelle Miller, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Spokane Valley, WA

The basic tenants of narrative therapy are social justice, social constructivism, and postmodernism. All of that to say, by telling our stories, we can write our own endings. We can get to know our problems, greet them and acknowledge them, and through working with them, decrease or even cease their power over us. Someone who self-harms might be trying to harm the problem, but instead harms themselves. Let's find that problem, pull it out and examine it. To know it, is to have power over it.

— Emily Graham, Therapist in Denver, CO
 

Narrative therapy involves changing the story we tell ourselves. All too often, we focus on the negative aspects of our past, telling and retelling a tragic tale... and when we tell a story of the future (to ourselves or others), it doesn't look much brighter. Let's fix that!

— Jennifer Miller, Counselor in Pensacola, FL

"Narrative therapy is a therapeutic approach that seeks to help people identify their values and the skills and knowledge they have to live these values, so they can effectively confront whatever problems they face. The narrative therapy approach views problems as separate from people and assumes people have many skills, abilities, values, commitments, beliefs and competencies that will assist them in changing their relationship with the problems influencing their lives." From Therapy Den

— Andy Dishman, Licensed Professional Counselor in MARIETTA, GA
 

Change the narrative and discover your purpose in life!!!

— Iris Cruet-Rubio, Psychotherapist in Gardena, CA

I have a Masters in Narrative Therapy and Community Work from The University of Melbourne and use my trainings to ask therapeutic questions with the people who see me.

— Karen Mittet, Counselor in Bellingham, WA

I studied Narrative Therapy in my graduate program, and currently practice with this approach. I believe everyone has a story to tell, and they can get to choose how to write it. I also use metaphors in my language with clients, as they can bring about another perspective or a way of looking at a problem in a different way.

— Rebecca Garetz, Counselor in Lake Oswego, OR
 

Narrative therapy emphasizes the power of personal narrative. We all have a story to tell, and how we tell it can affect how we think, feel, relate, and act. I use narrative therapy often in my practice. It can be especially helpful for individuals who do not fit into the dominant cultural narrative (e.g., white, heterosexual, cisgender, neurotypical).

— Samantha Auclair, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

We all use stories to make sense of our world and to share that understanding with others. Through borrowing tenets from narrative therapy and storytelling frameworks, I provide clients with a unique way to understand where they are in their own journey, how they got there, where they'd like to go next, and how to get moving in the right direction. Narrative therapy provides a great framework for guiding clients to unstick their stuck.

— Lacy Alana, Counselor in , TX