Suicidal Thoughts

If you are currently experiencing suicidal thoughts, call 1-800-273-8255 or 911 for help.

Suicidal thoughts, also known as suicidal ideation, means thinking about or planning suicide. Suicidal thoughts are typically in response to feeling that there is no solution to current problem or no end in sight to current pain. Suicidal thoughts are common – many people experience them at some point. However, these thoughts are temporary and passing in nature. If you are having recurrent suicidal thoughts, it likely won’t get better on its own. It’s important to remember that suicide is preventable. Even the most chronic suicidal thoughts and feelings can be resolved with time and support. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s suicidal thoughts experts today. If you are in immediate danger of hurting yourself, call 1-800-273-8255 or 911 for help.

Meet the specialists

Did you know that suicidal thoughts are incredibly common? Many people are afraid to admit to thoughts of death or suicide, in part because the thoughts are terrifying in and of themselves, but also out of a fear of how people will react. I have worked as a 911 dispatcher as well as a crisis hotline employee (including the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline). I have extensive training in crisis counseling, including suicide intervention. Talking about it is the first step to healing.

— Fiona Crounin, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Round Rock, TX
 

What if your thoughts of wanting to die held the keys to a better life? Life can be generally overwhelming or you might have recently experienced a barrage of loss, stress, and trauma that leaves you longing for an end to your pain. Thoughts of suicide can be freeing in that they allow you to bravely make big changes in your life, because the alternative is often so frightening. Working together we'll find out what aspects of your life are begging to be left behind so that you can thrive.

— Colleen Donaldson, Licensed Professional Counselor in West Allis, WI

Suicide has been a part of my life since I was in 8th grade. I have lost friends and family members to suicide over the years. I have also struggle at times with my own thoughts of suicide. Though it is not all I work with, I do hold a special place in my heart for those who have been touched by suicide whether through their personal lived experience, supporting loved ones who struggle with suicide, or the experience of grieving someone who has died by suicide.

— Julie Reichenberger, Counselor in Denver, CO
 

Crisis Clinician through Medical Center of Aurora HCAT team.

— Lori Pahl, Licensed Professional Counselor in Golden, CO

I've successfully supported clients to end suicidal thinking through using a variety of cognitive-behavioral techniques, mindfulness meditation and hypnotherapy. When you think you can't go on, I provide you the door to walk a different path turning your pain into peace. You don't have to end your life to get resolve and peace. There is another way. Let me show you.

— Bethany Latimer, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

I have extensive experience with suicidal thoughts, and am specifically trained to help with self-harm/self-injury.

— Kimberly Hansley, Licensed Professional Counselor in Dallas, TX

Sometimes, depression gets so bad that your brain can't generate any other way of managing emotion. It convinces you that suicide is an "escape" from pain, and you become plagued by these thoughts as a "default" response to high emotion. If you want to find a new default, let's talk openly about it. **Please note, I cannot be helpful if you are not willing to commit to stopping use of self-harm and suicidal behaviors. You may still experience urges, but be committed to not acting on them.**

— Jenna Nunziato, Clinical Social Worker
 

I am trained and experienced in assessing and addressing the suicidal thoughts that often come with the sadness and numbness for which clients are seeking help. I honor the vulnerability and fear that can come with talking about your suicidal thoughts. Know that you're not alone and that we can make a plan together to cope with and eliminate these hopeless thinking patterns.

— Kaitlin Boyd, Clinical Social Worker in Denver, CO

When you feel hopeless, it can seem like there is no way out. The good news is no feeling is permanent and feelings can change quickly. If you are feeling suicidal we can create a safety plan together to help you manage those times of hopelessness until that wave passes . We will also work on coping strategies to reduce depression and make it more manageable.

— Diane Kelley, Clinical Social Worker
 

People who have suicidal thoughts are usually survivors who have borne a lot of pain for a long time. They are resilient people. If you're still therapist hunting, a tiny part of you still wants to believe there is a way out of your situation that isn't as permanent or messy as self-murder. To do therapy work, you don’t have to want to live. You DO have to want to work towards wanting a life (worth living.)

— Marissa Lee, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA

I am aware of the taboo that surrounds talking about having suicidal thoughts, and I firmly believe that is part of the problem. We need to be able to express what is going on in our head, even if it feels dark and scary. Together, we can address these thoughts and figure out a game plan to help quiet them. You'd be amazed how helpful it can be to simply talk about them in safe and nonjudgemental environment.

— Alexandra Lo Re, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

Suicidal thinking and self-harming behavior is much more common in adolescents than many would know. For teens, it can be incredibly difficult to open up about self-harming behaviors, which are often met with responses of shaming or immediate problem-solving. I am trained in Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicide (CAMS) and Dialectical Behavior Therapy, two treatments of suicidal behavior most supported by research.

— Patrick Phelan, Counselor in Seattle, WA

Trained in state-of-the-art suicide prevention by the STAR-Center (https://www.starcenter.pitt.edu/about), using specialized and evidence based assessment and treatment for adolescents and young adults suffering from depression and/or anxiety.

— Meredythe Kimmel Hlasnik, Therapist
 

As part of my coursework to obtain my degree, I completed an internship with a crisis counseling hotline in my area. We received training on how to work with those that may be feeling suicidal and resources and tools they can use at the difficult time of their life. By having the right tools and resources, a person can get to a positive space and begin the focus on moving through the thoughts and feelings that may be causing them to feel like suicide may be the only option.

— Michael Lipps, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Saint Peters, MO

I've successfully supported clients to end suicidal thinking through using a variety of cognitive-behavioral techniques, mindfulness meditation and hypnotherapy. When you think you can't go on, I provide you the door to walk a different path turning your pain into peace. You don't have to end your life to get resolve and peace. There is another way. Let me show you.

— Bethany Latimer, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA